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Author Topic: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)  (Read 56460 times)

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Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #120 on: July 04, 2016, 12:15:03 AM »
Not much free time for modelling this weekend but I spent a couple of hours this evening adjusting coupler heights and back to backs on wagons, then played trains for a while.  I made a video but it's a bit rubbish - low resolution and a fixed camera position.  All the same it shows the couplers in action (or not, on two occasions - they still aren't perfect despite this evening's work).  I have found a back to back of 7.5mm works well, reducing the tendency of wagons to crab along the track when propelled.  I also finally got round to fitting MT knuckle couplers to the better of my two J39s, so I finally have a loco that is correct for the area and period (at least it will be when I renumber it).

https://youtu.be/WHqc5aGkHBg

Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #121 on: July 04, 2016, 07:46:27 AM »
Hi Richard
That is as good as anything I've seen or operated in the larger scales, including O gauge. I've certainly never operated 4 mil stuff with that kind of smoothness. You must be really pleased. I cant see any crabbing, and although it was difficult to see closely how the stock ran over the point work, it looks to be near perfect. The coupling/uncoupling was superb. It looks like you could have hours of fun shunting in N. Something I for one, thought was almost impossible.
I think this has helped me make my mind up about my next project. Almost certainly a finetrax project. Thanks Richard.

Kirky
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Offline R Marshall

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #122 on: July 04, 2016, 09:38:54 AM »
You may not be too worried about the tender version, but J39 tender versions are a bit of a minefield.

Perhaps you're already aware, or have a picture of your planned locomotive?

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #123 on: July 04, 2016, 10:23:59 AM »
Nice job, Richard :thumbsup:
I'd be very happy with that.

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #124 on: July 04, 2016, 10:30:45 AM »
You may not be too worried about the tender version, but J39 tender versions are a bit of a minefield.

Perhaps you're already aware, or have a picture of your planned locomotive?

Don't worry, I'm already picking my way through that particular minefield.  My "good" J39 has a flare-sided tender, and just about every North-Eastern J39 I have found a photo of had the Group Standard version.  I haven't yet found photos of all the North Blyth 1960-61 allocation, so crossing my fingers and hoping.

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #125 on: July 04, 2016, 10:41:46 AM »
Hi Richard
That is as good as anything I've seen or operated in the larger scales, including O gauge. I've certainly never operated 4 mil stuff with that kind of smoothness. You must be really pleased. I cant see any crabbing, and although it was difficult to see closely how the stock ran over the point work, it looks to be near perfect. The coupling/uncoupling was superb. It looks like you could have hours of fun shunting in N. Something I for one, thought was almost impossible.
I think this has helped me make my mind up about my next project. Almost certainly a finetrax project. Thanks Richard.

Kirky

Thanks, that is very kind of you.  I'm certainly pleased with it - I ran three more trains (one with the J39) after making the video, and although I'm still getting the odd coupler problem I only needed to use the "hand of God" once when the J39 disgraced itself by stopping dead on a section of clean, plain track for no obvious reason. There's something especially pleasing about shunting with steam locos - those big wheels and coupling rods going slowly round and round.

Not quite out of the woods yet - I've found that one of my point blades has been filed a little too thin and it bent over double when I cleaned the track.  I managed to straighten it but I can't see it lasting. So that will need replacing which is going to be tricky. But that apart I think track and couplers are pretty much sorted now, so time for a change of direction - buildings next, and lots of them which is something new for me. I'm trying to decide whether to use embossed Plastikard overlays or do it the hard way with the stonework scribed into a plaster-coated shell.  I'll probably try the smallest building first (weighbridge office) and see how I get on.

Offline R Marshall

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #126 on: July 04, 2016, 03:27:40 PM »
You may not be too worried about the tender version, but J39 tender versions are a bit of a minefield.

Perhaps you're already aware, or have a picture of your planned locomotive?

Don't worry, I'm already picking my way through that particular minefield.  My "good" J39 has a flare-sided tender, and just about every North-Eastern J39 I have found a photo of had the Group Standard version.  I haven't yet found photos of all the North Blyth 1960-61 allocation, so crossing my fingers and hoping.

The problem is that both flat sided and stepped sided tenders came in both 4200 gallon (as modelled by Farish) and 3500 gallon varieties, so it's easy to mistake the smaller tender for the larger. The 3500 gallon tenders had a longer cut down section at the rear end of the coping plate, making the outline of the top of the tender noticeably asymetrical.

Only 3 locomotives ran with the 4200 gallon stepped sided tender (64838, 64839, 64841) by the late 1950s and they don't appear to have been allocated to NE sheds. A quick look at pictures of NE J39s shows only 3500 gallon tenders of both types and ex-NER tenders.

I don't have allocations for 1961/2, only for 1950, 1955, 1959 and 1965. If you let me know the 52F allocations for 1961/2, I'll trawl through more of my pictures to see what I can find. Incidentally, Heaton, Blaydon and Tweedmouth all had good allocations of J39s in 1959.

Of course, by that time, withdrawal of some J39s (and other types) might mean that you can use modeller's licence to use a 4200 gallon tender swapped from a withdrawn locomotive.

Regards,

Roy


Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #127 on: July 04, 2016, 05:26:36 PM »

The problem is that both flat sided and stepped sided tenders came in both 4200 gallon (as modelled by Farish) and 3500 gallon varieties, so it's easy to mistake the smaller tender for the larger. The 3500 gallon tenders had a longer cut down section at the rear end of the coping plate, making the outline of the top of the tender noticeably asymetrical.

Only 3 locomotives ran with the 4200 gallon stepped sided tender (64838, 64839, 64841) by the late 1950s and they don't appear to have been allocated to NE sheds. A quick look at pictures of NE J39s shows only 3500 gallon tenders of both types and ex-NER tenders.

I don't have allocations for 1961/2, only for 1950, 1955, 1959 and 1965. If you let me know the 52F allocations for 1961/2, I'll trawl through more of my pictures to see what I can find. Incidentally, Heaton, Blaydon and Tweedmouth all had good allocations of J39s in 1959.

Of course, by that time, withdrawal of some J39s (and other types) might mean that you can use modeller's licence to use a 4200 gallon tender swapped from a withdrawn locomotive.

Regards,

Roy

Oooh, I hadn't realised there were two types of flare-side tenders.  Blyth's "Famous Four" were 64713, 64869, 64814 and 64846.  Apparently they weren't overly popular with the crews and didn't stay there for long.

Offline R Marshall

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #128 on: July 04, 2016, 08:49:47 PM »
Well, an initial survey turned up a picture of only 1 of the 4 - 64846 - and it has a NER 4125 gallon tender (albeit the picture dated is 1958). An easy reference illustration for this is the tender that Hornby shows with their Q6 model 63443 with early BR crest.

RCTS Part 6A shows the other 3 to have had flat sided 3500 gallon tenders.

All of the pictures I have found of J39s in the NE show flat sided 3500 gallon tenders (6 engines), apart from:

- 64719 (stepped 3500 gallon tender);

- 64910 (at York with a flat sided 4200 gallon tender - the other Farish tender); and

- 64758, 64778 and 64846 (all 3 with NER 4125 gallon tenders).

This is not the answer I hoped to give, but it still leaves the option of a swapped tender from a withdrawn engine.

Not finished looking yet - if I turn up anything else, I'll let you know

Regards,

Roy

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #129 on: July 04, 2016, 09:24:49 PM »
I have - 64877 -flat sided
64843 - NE tender in 1950, some kind of flare sided tender in 1959, with a station nameboard inconveniently hiding the important bits.
64845/941 - flat sided

I think I might have to stop rivet counting on this one.   Do not, please do not, raise any issues around the tenders attached to J27s. ;)

Offline R Marshall

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #130 on: July 04, 2016, 09:31:48 PM »
Best match so far, albeit with flat sided 4200 gallon tender, is 64897 at Alnwick in September 1962.
 
64917 (a Tweedmouth allocation in 1959) at Burnmouth and at Eyemouth is probably a bit too far North?

Your point on J27s noted. They were, at least all 3038 gallons !!!!!!!

Regards,

Roy

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #131 on: July 04, 2016, 09:55:22 PM »
Best match so far, albeit with flat sided 4200 gallon tender, is 64897 at Alnwick in September 1962.
 
64917 (a Tweedmouth allocation in 1959) at Burnmouth and at Eyemouth is probably a bit too far North?

Your point on J27s noted. They were, at least all 3038 gallons !!!!!!!

Regards,

Roy

My feeling is still that the Longframlington branch would have been worked from North Blyth, but it is after all an imaginary railway :) So I might go with 64917. Thank you for your input, much appreciated.

Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #132 on: July 05, 2016, 07:44:36 AM »
- buildings next, and lots of them which is something new for me. I'm trying to decide whether to use embossed Plastikard overlays or do it the hard way with the stonework scribed into a plaster-coated shell.  I'll probably try the smallest building first (weighbridge office) and see how I get on.

Have you thought of using redutex? A very nice product, but very pricey! But justified for such great track work.
Just a thought.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton will make its next public appearance at the LINCOLN MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION Feb 29th -1st Mar 2020



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

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Offline R Marshall

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #133 on: July 05, 2016, 11:18:47 AM »
Best match so far, albeit with flat sided 4200 gallon tender, is 64897 at Alnwick in September 1962.
 
64917 (a Tweedmouth allocation in 1959) at Burnmouth and at Eyemouth is probably a bit too far North?

Your point on J27s noted. They were, at least all 3038 gallons !!!!!!!

Regards,

Roy

My feeling is still that the Longframlington branch would have been worked from North Blyth, but it is after all an imaginary railway :) So I might go with 64917. Thank you for your input, much appreciated.

Sorry, I wasn't clear enough in what I sent - 64917 is also a flat sided 4200 gallon tender like 64897. Might be possible to get a spare Farish tender body to suit?

Regards,

Roy

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #134 on: July 10, 2016, 11:58:09 PM »
Another weekend of not much progress due to other commitments.  It's a good thing I'm not being paid to build this layout.  But a couple of things to report:

1. Buildings.  I've always been a bit dubious about card kits - to me they tend to look a bit flat and undetailed.  But so many people have told me good things about the Metcalfe kits that when I found they did a pair of houses exactly like the ones I wanted to back onto the railway, it would be silly not to give them a go.

I haven't built a card kit for ages, so the first one took a long time to build.  The second was much easier.  Generally I'm impressed, they look a lot better to my eyes than I expected.  The main change I made was to replace the roofs with Ratio slate roofing sheets, as I think the lack of relief detail on card kits tends to show up most from above.  I still have a bit of work to do - chimneys, shed roofs, ridge tiles, flashing around the chimneys and roof joins, and capping for the yard walls, also I think drainpipes and guttering would be nice.  They come with two alternative window types - two and four pane.  I used mostly four pane with a couple of odd two pane windows to break up the uniform appearance - I imagine that rotten windows would have been replaced with the cheaper, simpler variety. I'm certainly happy enough to order some low relief terraces from Metcalfe to do the opposite side of the street. I also purchased some plain stone sheets (again from Metcalfe) with which I will try a couple of scratchbuilt structures.



2. Ballasting.  I tried a small experimental section in the fiddle yard, using terrarium sand and diluted PVA glue. Once the glue had dried I carefully chipped away the sand from around the sleepers and under the rails, then gave the whole lot a coat of grey/brown emulsion paint.  I'm not 100% happy yet - the colour is too light for typical branch line ash / cinder ballast, and the shoulders are horribly uneven and patchy.  But it looks better in reality than in the photo, which also shows up the terrible uneven sleeper spacing you get with Finetrax if you aren't very careful.  This was a fiddle yard road so I wasn't very careful. The track in the visible area is better.



Still having recurring nightmares about ballasting the pointwork - Even with the very fine sand I am using it is going to be tricky to avoid gumming up the blades or getting stray sand grains into awkward places. Yet again that much-abused fiddle yard turnout will be the guinea pig.

Richard

 

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