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Author Topic: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)  (Read 48486 times)

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Offline R Marshall

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #90 on: June 22, 2016, 07:36:42 PM »
Hi Richard
Just stumbled across this. Very nice indeed. I still havent seen a finetrax layout in the flesh yet, so to speak. Ive got a boxful for a project which might get built sometime in the future. A Scottish steam layout perhaps but further west than Lauder, and probably further south (but still in Scotland) than Longframlington. When I get time........

Cheers
Kirky


Whithorn branch?  That's about as far south and west as you can go in Scotland, I've always thought it would be a nice one to model.

Not quite. I actually already have a half built permanent layout in my loft of New Galloway and Gatehouse stations with a bit of a viaduct

 in between. Unfortunately far too many things have conspired against me to finish it, not least of which is a small club layout. However, with any luck that will be finished soon and maybe I can start on a finetrax version of NG in the winter.

cheers
Kirky


Have you read David Smith's "Tales of the Glasgow and South Western Railway"? A must for the area you're covering  on that layout. The viaduct looks great.

Online belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #91 on: June 22, 2016, 09:24:47 PM »
I now have one turnout I am totally happy with and it has only taken me two hours to get there...  I was fiddling about with the point mechanisms and another tiebar broke.  One might just be unfortunate, two starts to look like a pattern.  I have been using 2mm Assoc sleepers as tiebars, and they clearly aren't strong enough.  I have a sheet of "modern" PCB - don't know what it is made of but it seems almost like some kind of ceramic material.  I cut a strip off it with the Dremel, tried to snap it and found that I couldn't (at least with my fingers) so it's probably strong enough.  Much thicker than either the Finetrax or 2mm Assoc sleeper tiebars so I had to cut away the track base under the tiebar, excavate a channel in the balsa base,then I could slip the tiebar in and solder it up.  Unfortunately it was a fraction too wide and I had no end of trouble trying to get the blades to move freely, hopefully won't make that mistake when I do the other four turnouts.

My J39 has one wheelset slightly narrower back to back than the others (Chinese New Year when it went through the quality control department), so I am setting check rail clearances to allow that loco to run freely through pointwork. After all this fiddling, it now runs through the turnout at the end of the loop as if it was plain track.  It is fair to say that Finetrax needs a certain amount of careful attention to detail if you want to get the best out of it (although you will have a lot less trouble if you stick with the supplied cast frogs rather than making your own as I did) but the results are worth all the grief. N gauge running as smoothly and steadily as the larger scales.

Meanwhile the layout still keeps attracting wildlife.  There is a very small beetle wandering along the trackbed.  Knowing my luck it will be some kind of wood-boring beetle.

Offline Mito

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #92 on: June 22, 2016, 09:54:10 PM »
The wild life must be insecting your work. :D
You know you're getting older when your mind makes commitments your body can't meet.
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=40567.0 125x60 and a bit.
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=24101.0 Off on a journey

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #93 on: June 22, 2016, 10:03:38 PM »

Meanwhile the layout still keeps attracting wildlife.  There is a very small beetle wandering along the trackbed.  Knowing my luck it will be some kind of wood-boring beetle.

Sadly the red spider mite season is upon me again. These tiny red spiders tend to spontaneously explode if you even so much as look at them, leaving a small smear of blood on whatever surface they were on. Luckily I don't think there's anything that would hurt a loco if the loco munched one off the tracks, which I'm sure has happened by now :uneasy:

Online belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #94 on: June 22, 2016, 10:12:54 PM »

Meanwhile the layout still keeps attracting wildlife.  There is a very small beetle wandering along the trackbed.  Knowing my luck it will be some kind of wood-boring beetle.

Sadly the red spider mite season is upon me again. These tiny red spiders tend to spontaneously explode if you even so much as look at them, leaving a small smear of blood on whatever surface they were on. Luckily I don't think there's anything that would hurt a loco if the loco munched one off the tracks, which I'm sure has happened by now :uneasy:

I'm glad it's not just me that has this kind of thing happen.  I live in a very rural area, have had problems in the past with mice nibbling the scenery.  Bet you don't get that in Pinner or Bromley.

Online kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #95 on: June 22, 2016, 10:44:44 PM »
Hi Richard
Just stumbled across this. Very nice indeed. I still havent seen a finetrax layout in the flesh yet, so to speak. Ive got a boxful for a project which might get built sometime in the future. A Scottish steam layout perhaps but further west than Lauder, and probably further south (but still in Scotland) than Longframlington. When I get time........

Cheers
Kirky


Whithorn branch?  That's about as far south and west as you can go in Scotland, I've always thought it would be a nice one to model.

Not quite. I actually already have a half built permanent layout in my loft of New Galloway and Gatehouse stations with a bit of a viaduct

 in between. Unfortunately far too many things have conspired against me to finish it, not least of which is a small club layout. However, with any luck that will be finished soon and maybe I can start on a finetrax version of NG in the winter.

cheers
Kirky


Have you read David Smith's "Tales of the Glasgow and South Western Railway"? A must for the area you're covering  on that layout. The viaduct looks great.

Indeed I have, along with several other publications by said Mr Smith.
Enough of hijacking Richards thread though...back to Longframlington.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton is in the August 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller

and in real life at the Hartlepool MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION
October 2019



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Online belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #96 on: June 22, 2016, 11:06:31 PM »

Indeed I have, along with several other publications by said Mr Smith.
Enough of hijacking Richards thread though...back to Longframlington.

Cheers
Kirky

Feel free to hijack.  The GSWR doesn't get nearly enough attention.

Offline Milton Rail

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #97 on: June 25, 2016, 07:03:52 AM »
Great perseverance with the trackwork, well done!

That is an impressive viaduct!  Jealous is not the word for it!

Online belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #98 on: June 27, 2016, 10:57:24 AM »
Not much progress to report as I was away most of the weekend, but I have managed to get all five turnouts operating properly, and fitted a small capacitor discharge unit (5.99 inc postage from Ebay).  I am now turning my attention to the uncoupling issue.  One of my under-track magnets was duff: having replaced that I now find that the magnets are actually too strong, or set too far apart, or both: they pull the coupler knuckles so far apart that the tongues do not engage as they should.

I tried making up an under-track electromagnetic uncoupler (SEEP point motor cut in half to make two solenoid coils, with iron nails through the board under the rails) but it doesn't work :( Attracts screwdrivers very nicely but not coupler trip pins. I also tried one of the MTL uncoupling magnets which sit between the rails, but these are just as rubbish as I remember them being when I tried them before.  Possibly they have lost their magnetism due to old age and poor storage, but they don't pull the knuckles far enough apart for reliable uncoupling.  So it looks like I will have to dig out my home-made coupler project, sort out the worst of the design flaws and have another go, possibly this time with electromagnets rather than permanent magnets.  Or I could have another crack at the B&B / DG finescale couplers and see if my skills with small fiddly components have improved enough to make these work.

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #99 on: June 27, 2016, 01:09:33 PM »
I, for one, much appreciate all this work on couplings you're doing as I'm sure it will benefit a lot of us :thumbsup:

Online belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #100 on: June 27, 2016, 07:37:36 PM »
A bit more fiddling and I am now getting better results by spacing the magnets about 1.5mm apart and adding the MicroTrains "truck retaining springs" to vehicle axles to increase rolling resistance.  That limits train lengths, but with such a small fiddle yard it's not a problem for me. I'm still experimenting - next step is to try magnets buried in the baseboard edgeways which will mean lifting a short section of track.  I also want to open out the back to backs on the wagons as far as I can get away with, as this will reduce the tendency to "yaw" on the track when the couplers are in the delayed position.  Time to crack open another can of Speckled Hen and get my Chinese fake Dremel out I think.

Online belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #101 on: June 27, 2016, 10:41:33 PM »
A reasonably successful shunting session with the Pannier, which isn't exactly Northern but has the advantage of MTL knuckle couplers at both ends. The baseboard is littered with wagons which aren't up to the required specification.  Mild steel axles are a no-no. I managed to assemble 12 working wagons which is enough to have some fun with.


Online kirky

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #102 on: June 28, 2016, 06:58:59 AM »
Thanks Richard.
What's wrong with steel axles? What are using if not steel?
You are showing some great perseverance with those couplers. I think I would have given up a long time ago, or used the dapol easishunt things, even if they are big.
The track looks great though.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton is in the August 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller

and in real life at the Hartlepool MODEL RAILWAY CLUB ANNUAL EXHIBITION
October 2019



Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Online belstone

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #103 on: June 28, 2016, 10:29:15 AM »
Thanks Richard.
What's wrong with steel axles? What are using if not steel?
You are showing some great perseverance with those couplers. I think I would have given up a long time ago, or used the dapol easishunt things, even if they are big.
The track looks great though.

Cheers
Kirky

Mild steel axles are attracted to the uncoupling magnets which tends to pull vehicles together as they pass over the magnets, so they uncouple themselves.  Farish switched to non-magnetic axles (stainless steel I suspect) a while ago and Dapol also seem to be non-magnetic, but I still have a fair few of the magnetic Farish wheelsets to change, and a load of Parkside-Dundas wheels which are even worse as they have steel tyres.  Peco are of course plastic but don't much like the Finetrax turnouts and cannot be regauged. Basically the Micro Trains couplers were designed to work with American bogie wagons, not short wheelbase four wheelers.  I'd be having the same problems with the Easishunts as they are a magnetic knuckle coupler like the MTs, plus I would have to fit NEM pockets to all my stock.  After last night I'm not too unhappy with the way the MT knuckles are performing, it's mostly a question of making sure they are adjusted properly. I just wish I could think of a way of damping the springs to stop vehicles oscillating lengthways at low speeds.  More weight helps there.

I could always try working three-link couplings :)

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (and this time I mean it) - Border country, 1963
« Reply #104 on: June 28, 2016, 10:37:55 AM »

I could always try working three-link couplings :)

Now that would be a neat trick and could be a moneyspinner :D

 

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