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Author Topic: Cleaning Shapeways FUD  (Read 4713 times)

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Offline James320

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Re: Cleaning Shapeways FUD
« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2016, 08:26:07 AM »
This guy uses something called Bestine which the Americans all seem to use: https://jamestrainparts.wordpress.com/2014/12/15/cleaning-up-3d-printed-models/

Hi Guys,

Yes Bestin is good however as many of you have found its a pain to find here in the UK because of its highly flammable nature.  However the main chemical that makes it work for us is Heptane which is also used in pure white spirit.  However donít just use any white spirit as some manufactures add in other chemical and I have found these to be corrosive to the FUD.  A safe bet, and one I use for most of my 3D prints, is Goo Gone.  It takes a bit longer than a Heptane product and leaves a yellow/off white colour on the surface but the overall effect is the same.  Here is a shell I am working on now that was soaked in Goo Gone.



I tend to find that they need 24 hours to soak and another 24 hours to dry out.

-James

Offline Bob Tidbury

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Re: Cleaning Shapeways FUD
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2017, 03:35:55 PM »
Only Me recomends  Swarfega for cleaning and Halfords Bumper Primer for priming and of course Acrylic paint.
Bob

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Re: Cleaning Shapeways FUD
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2017, 03:37:58 PM »
This guy uses something called Bestine which the Americans all seem to use: https://jamestrainparts.wordpress.com/2014/12/15/cleaning-up-3d-printed-models/

Hi Guys,

Yes Bestin is good however as many of you have found its a pain to find here in the UK because of its highly flammable nature.  However the main chemical that makes it work for us is Heptane which is also used in pure white spirit.  However donít just use any white spirit as some manufactures add in other chemical and I have found these to be corrosive to the FUD.  A safe bet, and one I use for most of my 3D prints, is Goo Gone.  It takes a bit longer than a Heptane product and leaves a yellow/off white colour on the surface but the overall effect is the same.  Here is a shell I am working on now that was soaked in Goo Gone.



I tend to find that they need 24 hours to soak and another 24 hours to dry out.

-James

You can buy Heptane online in 5Ltr packs.

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Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2017, 12:57:04 PM »
Burnish with a fiberglass pen and Halfords filler spray paint to remove striping

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2017, 02:32:00 PM »
Lovely model of a lovely prototype that I was lucky enough to see in steam last summer!  :D

I wouldn't use filler primer as I find it clogs the fine detail very quickly. Personally, I'd use Halfords plastic primer (grey or red depending on the top coat) and Albion Alloys 3mm wide sanding sticks (http://www.modelsrgo.co.uk/albion-alloys-mini-sanding-sticks-15.html) and some fine wet and dry to remove the stepping effect.

Make sure you leave at least twelve hours between each primer coat and rubbing down - I've found trying to rub down more quickly than this will result in the slightly soft paint peeling slightly which leaves a ridge which won't easily disappear with subsequent coats.

No interest in Albion Alloys other than as a very satisfied customer.

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2017, 03:03:35 PM »
Lovely model of a lovely prototype that I was lucky enough to see in steam last summer!  :D

I wouldn't use filler primer as I find it clogs the fine detail very quickly. Personally, I'd use Halfords plastic primer (grey or red depending on the top coat) and Albion Alloys 3mm wide sanding sticks (http://www.modelsrgo.co.uk/albion-alloys-mini-sanding-sticks-15.html) and some fine wet and dry to remove the stepping effect.

Make sure you leave at least twelve hours between each primer coat and rubbing down - I've found trying to rub down more quickly than this will result in the slightly soft paint peeling slightly which leaves a ridge which won't easily disappear with subsequent coats.

No interest in Albion Alloys other than as a very satisfied customer.


Yes it can clog detail if you over spray however the fiberglass pen gets into the detail and unclogs.  The fiberglass pen also burnishes to a shined surface if you are patient.

Virtually all grades of grit based sandpaper will fur the surface and if you must sand then use the filing buffing polishing sticks used for fingernails.

Offline queensquare

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2017, 03:11:52 PM »
I'd agree with Alex, don't use the filling primer, it's far too thick. Regular, acrylic primer is fine. Also, fine wet and dry won't fur up the surface. I make up my own sanding sticks with wet and dry stuck to  offcuts of plasticard with double sided tape. You can make any shape you want to fit in and around the fine detail.

Jerry

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2017, 03:25:58 PM »
I don't doubt that using wet and dry can be used in a way that wont do damage but not everyone has your skill.  I have seen a lot of FUD damaged with wet and dry.

The advantage of the fiberglass stick is the abrasion rate is much slower so if its going wrong you see it and stop rather than finding the wet and dry has destroyed the surface with the first stroke.

The fiberglass pen allows you to surface over and around surface features like rivets without wiping them out.

Each to their own, i prefer caution.

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2017, 03:28:46 PM »
An old trick with wet and dry.  Rub it on hard soap first to create a slippy abrasive surface.  It reduces the cut depth and makes the sanding far more controllable.

Been sanding plastics for 50 years.  :D

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #24 on: March 26, 2017, 04:54:54 PM »
I don't doubt that using wet and dry can be used in a way that wont do damage but not everyone has your skill.  I have seen a lot of FUD damaged with wet and dry.

The advantage of the fiberglass stick is the abrasion rate is much slower so if its going wrong you see it and stop rather than finding the wet and dry has destroyed the surface with the first stroke.

The fiberglass pen allows you to surface over and around surface features like rivets without wiping them out.

Each to their own, i prefer caution.

This is interesting as I've never had great success using a fiberglass stick and would say the same for this method in destroying details such as rivets as you do for wet and dry. I nearly always use wet and dry wet as I find it gives a better cut and usually don't use anything coarser than 800 grit nowadays. As Jerry says, you can make up your own sanding sticks and it is entirely possible  to make shapes that fit around details you wish to keep.

As you said, each to their own but I would really like to hear more about your fiberglass stick technique.

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2017, 05:11:53 PM »
I have done a lot of white metal war gaming figures and you cannot sand a face or uniform detail, that's where the technique came from.  The technique is rotary like metal burnishing on a smaller scale.

The problem with FUD is the layer lines, and you have to fill them not sand them off.  That what I use the filler spray for, filing back with the fiberglass to the bare FUD with lines of filler in the grooves.

Three cycles of this and you find the grooves are full and the surface is flat and no other detail is affected.  You can then use grey undercoat etc.

FUD furs like wood grain and you want to do everything to avoid roughening the surface.  It is better to cut with a sharp knife or even scrape rather than sand it you want a sympathetic surface to paint.

Offline Stevie DC

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Re: Cleaning up FUD
« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2017, 05:19:05 PM »
Thanks Snowwolflair, I'll give that a try next time I order a FUD print.  :)

However, I've never encountered the FUD furs you describe when cutting back a FUD print. Below are a couple of pictures of my prototype N2 print, the first is simply washed/lightly scrubbed and primed (showing the stepping) while the second is of the completed model which was sanded with wet and dry (and showing my inability to apply transfers without them silvering at the time!).





Apologies to AR for taking his thread a little off topic.  :sorrysign:

 

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