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Author Topic: Icons of N gauge  (Read 15275 times)

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Offline belstone

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Icons of N gauge
« on: July 07, 2015, 12:03:23 AM »
The Lone Star OOO thread got me thinking.  If I were to start a collection of the most significant British N gauge items of the last 50 years, what would be in it?  Peco Jubilee (obviously), Farish 9400 tank (early version), possibly a Lima AL6 (class 86) in the early Wrenn Micromodels packaging, and maybe a Minitrix Britannia. Rolling stock - some Minitrix Mk1s, Farish Pullmans and early production Peco wagons.  Any other suggestions? I'm thinking of models that actually raised standards in N gauge.

Offline D1042 Western Princess

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2015, 08:53:38 AM »
For me a big advance in N stock came when Farish introduced their Mk1 coach and, for the first time, we had a real British passenger vehicle accurate for scale, with a fitted interior and little details like 1st class and non smoking indications on the windows.
Before that we had had to put up with under scale coaches (for British prototype) from Lima or the better, but very basic, Minitrix vehicles.

P/S And the only 'choice' before these were introduced was either a composite or brake vehicle. Not a brilliant 'selection' to make up a prototypical train!
 
« Last Edit: July 07, 2015, 08:59:26 AM by D1042 Western Princess, Reason: additional information. »
If it's not a Diesel Hydraulic then it's not a real locomotive.

Offline Roy L S

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2015, 10:23:44 AM »
The Lone Star OOO thread got me thinking.  If I were to start a collection of the most significant British N gauge items of the last 50 years, what would be in it?  Peco Jubilee (obviously), Farish 9400 tank (early version), possibly a Lima AL6 (class 86) in the early Wrenn Micromodels packaging, and maybe a Minitrix Britannia. Rolling stock - some Minitrix Mk1s, Farish Pullmans and early production Peco wagons.  Any other suggestions? I'm thinking of models that actually raised standards in N gauge.

For me probably the biggest single advance for British N happened in 1976 when Farish introduced their "new" steam loco chassis replacing the rubbishy plastic ones. These chassis was well designed, reliable and worked pretty well even in three pole form. It stood the test of time for over 30 years through the five pole variants and upgraded incarnations of them continued to be produced by Bachmann until only a few years ago. This basic chassis design formed the basis of so many locos without which British N could never have grown in the way it did.

Roy

Offline Skyline2uk

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2015, 10:44:29 AM »
I know quite modern but since I have been in the hobby biggest steps forward (personal opinion):

Kato Eurostar
Outside Frame Class 08 by Farish
JJA Autoballest by Farish
Blue Pullman

Skyline2uk

Online Bealman

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2015, 11:26:57 AM »
I'll go with the Blue Pullman  :drool:

But how about track. Peco flexible in the late 60s and in particular the long point and crossing. I reckon that planted the idea of realistic curves and sweeping landscape vistas in the minds of many innovative people back then.  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Karhedron

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2015, 12:01:31 PM »
I would be tempted to say the new Jubilee as it was the first all-new steamer since Farish was taken over by Bachmann. Prior to that it had all be re-relases of old Poole-era models. This was the first one with details like separate handrails, finer wheels and all the modern specs that we now take for granted.
Well, that's just not good enough. Some fount of all knowledge you are!  :no:  ;)

Offline Karhedron

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2015, 12:03:18 PM »
The Dapol 48xx/14xx auto tank and coach also deserves a mention as it was their first N gauge release. Arguably the entry of Dapol gave the whole scale a much-needed shot in the arm and encouraged Farish to up their game.

Whilst they have had their QC issues, the N gauge range would have been far poorer without their entry.
Well, that's just not good enough. Some fount of all knowledge you are!  :no:  ;)

Offline Dr Al

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2015, 12:43:46 PM »
I would be tempted to say the new Jubilee as it was the first all-new steamer since Farish was taken over by Bachmann. Prior to that it had all be re-relases of old Poole-era models.

That's not entirely true - the V2 was the first Bachmann released model. I think from what I've read that it was in the offing from Poole Farish but Bachmann scrapped the chassis designs and started a fresh. It was the first with separate handrails, can motor, finer profile wheels, etc.

The Jubilee was the first (Farish) with proper spoked wheels and was another step up worthy of being on the list as you say.

Cheers
Alan
Quote from: Roy L S
If Dr Al is online he may be able to provide a more comprehensive answer.

“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.” – Dr. Carl Sagan

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2015, 12:44:19 PM »
Has to be Farish gears.

Never in the field of N gauge modelling has so much hair been pulled out by so many with few hairs anyway :laugh:

Online Bealman

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2015, 12:48:34 PM »
 :laughabovepost: :smiley-laughing:

I've got drawers full of 'em! Locos with split gears, not hairs  :worried:

Yep, definitely a British N icon.... split gears.

On ya, NPN.  :thumbsup: :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Adrian

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2015, 01:44:03 PM »
Very personal thing - icons.  So everyone can record what stands out for them

For me, perhaps defining "icon" a little more broadly, it has to be Chee Tor.  When I first saw it at a show, all those years ago, it was the first time I'd seen a layout with so much impressive scenery and then, as I watched, this tiny but lengthy train appeared and drifted through the scene.  It's something that has stuck with me.

I appreciate that Chee Tor was 2mm not N gauge and that other layouts, equally impressive, have come along since, but as a lasting impression and encouragement to work in the small scale, it's definitely an icon for me.

Adrian

Offline Skyline2uk

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2015, 01:52:42 PM »
If we are allowed to name layouts (and why not indeed) then my vote is for Hedges Hill Cutting.

I have had the privilege of operating this small layout and was told this weekend that it more than 20 years young.

In my humble opinion it deserves a mention because it still makes even modern standard n gauge models look even better.

Skyline2uk

Offline D1042 Western Princess

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2015, 02:11:27 PM »
Very personal thing - icons.  So everyone can record what stands out for them

For me, perhaps defining "icon" a little more broadly, it has to be Chee Tor.  When I first saw it at a show, all those years ago, it was the first time I'd seen a layout with so much impressive scenery and then, as I watched, this tiny but lengthy train appeared and drifted through the scene.  It's something that has stuck with me.

I appreciate that Chee Tor was 2mm not N gauge and that other layouts, equally impressive, have come along since, but as a lasting impression and encouragement to work in the small scale, it's definitely an icon for me.

Adrian

Chee Tor - I only saw it once but to me that was what N Gauge is all about - trains lost in the landscape in a way other sizes can not come close, let alone match.
Chiltern Green had the same effect on me.
If it's not a Diesel Hydraulic then it's not a real locomotive.

Offline Ensign Elliott

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #13 on: July 07, 2015, 03:07:24 PM »
Good idea for a thread.

For me, who came into the N Gauge world in the mid 90s, my icons are:

Farish 94xx - my first N loco
Dapol 14xx and Autocoach - as others have said, gave a much needed shot in the arm for N and launched Dapol as a competitor for GF, thus making GF up its game.
Farish V2 - the first ready to run loco with separate handrails - something which got me very excited at the time.
Peco Collett - a new ready to run loco from Peco after many years. At the time, an exciting prospect of yet a third company making RTR locos (sadly not to be).

Offline macwales

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Re: Icons of N gauge
« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2015, 03:20:54 PM »
Hi

For me

Icon 1 - Reliability of Minitrix locos in the 1980's

Icon 2 - Dapol's cardon drive shaft - such fun - but so much better than tender drives!!

Icon 3 The Brighton Bell - and carriage lighting in general.

Cheers

Mac  :beers:

 

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