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Author Topic: Practical LED usage...  (Read 1818 times)

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Offline Zogbert Splod

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Practical LED usage...
« on: May 09, 2015, 09:19:58 PM »
This is not a heavy theory article.  It's just a way to let someone change the brightness of an LED to suit the use to which it is being put.  It can also be used to balance the brightness of more than one LED.  Different colours can look different in brightness, this will allow you to make them look closer to one another.

The 'how to' is not universal and may possibly not suit your application.  If this is the case - ASK!

It's a PDF


Regards, Allan.....
« Last Edit: January 09, 2017, 12:48:41 PM by Only Me »
"When in trouble, when in doubt, run (trains) in circles..." etc.
There, doesn't that feel better? 
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Offline Only Me

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2017, 12:49:22 PM »
Try Now Alan @Zogbert Splod



Offline Zogbert Splod

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2017, 01:58:42 PM »
"When in trouble, when in doubt, run (trains) in circles..." etc.
There, doesn't that feel better? 
Lovely!

Planning thread:
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=25873.0

My website: Zog Trains

Run what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law
I may appear to be listening to you, but inside my head, I'm playing with my trains.

Steamie+

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2017, 06:00:19 AM »
This is not a heavy theory article.  It's just a way to let someone change the brightness of an LED to suit the use to which it is being put.  It can also be used to balance the brightness of more than one LED.  Different colours can look different in brightness, this will allow you to make them look closer to one another.

The 'how to' is not universal and may possibly not suit your application.  If this is the case - ASK!

It's a PDF


Regards, Allan.....


Thanks for that info, but itís still to heavy for me  :dunce: not really the best at taking in electrical stuff at all,but i do get there in the end.   :thumbsup:

Offline RMurphy195

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2017, 10:33:04 PM »

Thanks for that info, but itís still to heavy for me  :dunce: not really the best at taking in electrical stuff at all,but i do get there in the end.   :thumbsup:

All LED's need a resistor to limit the current otherwise they will blow up.

The higher the resistance (bigger the resistor), the dimmer the LED will be.

The excellent PDF article shows you how to work out what the minimum resistance needs to be, and how to work out how much to increase it to get the brightness you want.

Offline TrevL

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2018, 08:48:55 AM »
Many thanks Allan,  @Zogbert Splod
Just what I needed, cheers.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 08:50:38 AM by TrevL »
Cheers, Trev.


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Offline dannyboy

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2018, 07:44:20 PM »
I have not yet read your article Allan @Zogbert Splod  but what is your opinion on a 12v dimmer for led's, like this one, (as an example)  -

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-Adjustable-Controller-LED-Dimmer-Switch-For-Dimmable-Light-Bulb-White-UK/163240906587?hash=item2601ea8f5b:g:ZWAAAOSw0c9bj855
David.
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Offline RMurphy195

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2018, 08:56:51 PM »
I have not yet read your article Allan @Zogbert Splod  but what is your opinion on a 12v dimmer for led's, like this one, (as an example)  -

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-Adjustable-Controller-LED-Dimmer-Switch-For-Dimmable-Light-Bulb-White-UK/163240906587?hash=item2601ea8f5b:g:ZWAAAOSw0c9bj855


There are two ways of dimming an LED - include a variable resistor into the supply circuit as well as the fixed resistor (so you always have a current limiter), the other is to supply a PWM signal - which means switching the LED on and off rapidly, which is what the output from, say, an Arduino will do.

The item in the link does the PWM thing, and its really designed for house lighting, a bit OTT from a hobby viewpoint.

On my circuits unless I'm powering from an Arduino (for software-driven lighting), I just introduce a variable resistor (such as a trimmer) into the circuit to turn the brightness up and down, suh as shown in the attached circuit diagram extract.
 The trim potentiometer cost about 14p and has a limited life(https://www.bitsbox.co.uk/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=94_95), for a few pennies more get one of these https://www.bitsbox.co.uk/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=94_325

Offline GrahamB

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2018, 07:39:06 AM »
I'm playing with LED street and platform lights and have ordered some 20k ohm resistors with a 12V supply (Yes, 20k ohm) resistor to produce a more realistic light that doesn't dazzle.

Offline Quinn

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Re: Practical LED usage...
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2018, 11:15:30 AM »
I'm playing with LED street and platform lights and have ordered some 20k ohm resistors with a 12V supply (Yes, 20k ohm) resistor to produce a more realistic light that doesn't dazzle.

This is where it's at. Even with interior lights I include a fixed resistor, anything between 1k and 10k depending on the brightness I want, and for each building and set of street lights (day and night) include a preset which can vary between 5k and 20k. I usually mount these beneath the floors of buildings. Street light resistors are wired to little pieces of stripboard. As we seem to have a family habit of lighting models at 6 volts we've tabulated resistor values for various brightnesses. The 6v is pulled from a 12v supply using a three pin regulator chip.

For dim we think 500ĶA or less, for bright about 2mA, for dazzle, the full 10mA. Even for a non-electrician it's easy to calculate what resistor is needed. But always include a fixed one with the preset in case of mistakes.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2018, 11:16:42 AM by Quinn, Reason: Added the word "models" »

 

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