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Poll

What do you think of this model?

Superb
2 (6.9%)
Good
12 (41.4%)
OK
11 (37.9%)
Poor
4 (13.8%)
Terrible
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Total Members Voted: 28

Author Topic: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's  (Read 3872 times)

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Offline Tank

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Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« on: January 22, 2011, 08:25:31 PM »
 :NGaugeForum:

Offline longbridge

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2011, 11:22:30 PM »
I put good for this one as I purchased one a few weeks ago, it has never been run and was in brand new condition, runs very well including slow running.
Keep on Smiling
Dave.

Offline MJKERR

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2011, 08:59:34 AM »
I agree, apart from the slightly updated bodywork, this one runs better than the DCC ready version

Why is this topic a duplicate of :
[link removed]
« Last Edit: May 12, 2011, 11:58:35 AM by mjkerr »

Offline Tank

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2011, 09:12:55 AM »
A mistake. :thumbsup:  Cheers.

Online Chris in Prague

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2014, 06:16:36 PM »
I agree, apart from the slightly updated bodywork, this one runs better than the DCC ready version

Why is this topic a duplicate of :
[link removed]

Why better than the current DCC Ready version? (One of these was the 'donor' for my D1662 as transformed by Pauline.)

Offline DesertHound

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2014, 06:56:58 PM »
They get a "Good" from me. Have lots of these and love them. I do find, however, that the larger locos need a bit more "ooomph" than the smaller ones. I wonder if it's to do with the longer shafts in order to reach the bogie towers translating into more power being needed.

Any mechanical engineers out there?

A piddle to work on. Have had to replace a few dud armatures but that's probably down to the previous owners not looking after them properly, rather than the locos themselves.

Love them in front of a rake of Blue/Grey MkI's  :)

Dan

Dan
Visit www.thefarishshed.com for all things Poole Farish and have the confidence to look under the bonnet of your locos!

Online Dr Al

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2014, 07:05:42 PM »
They get a "Good" from me. Have lots of these and love them. I do find, however, that the larger locos need a bit more "ooomph" than the smaller ones. I wonder if it's to do with the longer shafts in order to reach the bogie towers translating into more power being needed.

Shouldn't make any significant difference - the longer shafts are not significantly heavier and they also run on a pair of bearings like the shorter shafts, so to first order the friction should be the same. Only if the shafts are misaligned relative to the armature will the longer lever arm put more friction into the drive (and only on spring drive chassis; the drive couplings are good in this respect as the shafts can engage with minor misalignments without issues).

Indeed of all the Poole locos I've had, the one that ran the coolest and on the lowest current was a 47.

Cheers,
Alan
Quote from: Roy L S
If Dr Al is online he may be able to provide a more comprehensive answer.

“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.” – Dr. Carl Sagan

Offline DesertHound

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2014, 07:17:18 PM »
Al

I was thinking more along the lines of shaft length being a factor rather than friction in the bearings. I'll look into it but doesn't shaft length play a role in torque, or something to that effect? The longer the shaft, the less mechanical energy is translated to the gears.

That's my thinking anyhow.

Dan

I personally go for drive coupling springs over the plastic ones due to noise, although occasionally I leave the plastic ones in when I'm having issues aligning everything.

Are you saying the plastic ones are better at "dumbing down" any misalignment, whereas the springs accentuate it?
« Last Edit: October 04, 2014, 07:18:39 PM by DesertHound »
Visit www.thefarishshed.com for all things Poole Farish and have the confidence to look under the bonnet of your locos!

Online Dr Al

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2014, 07:24:28 PM »
I was thinking more along the lines of shaft length being a factor rather than friction in the bearings. I'll look into it but doesn't shaft length play a role in torque, or something to that effect? The longer the shaft, the less mechanical energy is translated to the gears.

Torque is related to the force at a given radius. So, given that the radius at which the force is being applied is the same (i.e. the worm gear, same in both cases, as well as the friction applied at the same radius in both cases also by the bearings), the length does not play a part. It will play a part if the length is such that the weight of the shaft is much greater, and therefore it interacts with it's bearings in a different way due to friction and inertia. But for these mechanisms that's just not an issue.

I personally go for drive coupling springs over the plastic ones due to noise, although occasionally I leave the plastic ones in when I'm having issues aligning everything.

Are you saying the plastic ones are better at "dumbing down" any misalignment, whereas the springs accentuate it?

Yes, in short. This can be seen particularly if you use some of the stiffer springs (there are various ones out there) - it's almost always the case that there is more friction in the block as compared to the same chassis with less stiff springs, or drive couplings. It's definitely the case that the tooling for the chassis is imperfect and therefore the shafts never perfectly align.

Cheers,
Alan
Quote from: Roy L S
If Dr Al is online he may be able to provide a more comprehensive answer.

“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.” – Dr. Carl Sagan

Offline simonprelude

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2015, 05:40:50 PM »
Are these the ones that there's an intercity liveried one?
Should the bodies be held onto the chassis at all or are they just loose?

Offline Bob G

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2015, 11:42:18 PM »
The title of the thread is a misnomer - i saw it as meaning the new 47s from the 1990s with the 47/4 detailing e.g. antennae etc.
I should have given it a fair rather than a good rating. The early Poole version (from 1981 actually) always looked better in green than blue.
Best
Bob

Offline Mr Sprue

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Re: Graham Farish - Class 47's - From 1990's
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2015, 09:31:06 AM »
For the technology that was around 25 years ago I voted a good.

 

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