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Author Topic: Two old favourites  (Read 778 times)

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Online Bealman

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Two old favourites
« on: March 14, 2014, 12:24:03 AM »
I originally intended to put this post in the book reviews section, but that is in 'form' format and doesn't like you trying to post pictures, apparently.

These are two old favourites of mine, which I acquired at the time they were just hot off the press!
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As can be seen, the first is a little 2/6 booklet by G. M. Kichenside and Alan Williams, third ed. and published by Ian Allan Ltd. in 1962. My mother bought this for me when we were on a day trip from Durham to Darlington by train. It was bought at W. H. Smiths on the platform of Darlington Banktop station in the year of publication. I was 10 years old!

That little booklet was like a bible to me in my teenage years, and I still flip through it on a regular basis today.  Much of what it contains is relevant even now. It covers a lot of stuff in 72 pages! Chapters are: 1) Scales and Gauges 2) Layouts 3) Foundations and Baseboards 4) Permanent Way 5) Electrification and Power Units 6) Locomotives 7) Rolling Stock 8: Signalling 9)Buildings and Scenery 10) Operation 11) Maintenance.

The introduction makes interesting reading. TT gauge had just recently come onto the market. N gauge was still known as 000 gauge, and the only commercial equipment available then was the Lone Star stuff! The introduction notes:

In 000 gauge, considerations of size limit the prototypes that can be modelled to acceptable standards economically, and the gauge is unlikely to offer any serious competition to the larger gauges.

As can be seen, the rear cover features an advert for Hornby Dublo - 'A complete railway on a table.' At the time, the firm was in the process of changing over from it's old tinplate 3-rail track to 2-rail with plastic sleepers.

The other book, The Observer's Book of Railway Locomotives of Britain by H. C. Casserley (Ed.) was also bang up-to-date when I bought it while on holiday at Berwick in 1967 (see photo). It is especially interesting because at that time, steam locomotives were being brutally removed from the system, and indeed, only had 12 or so months left!!

The introduction goes on at some length about this, noting:

The two hundred or more major classes which were described in the first edition of 1955 are already reduced by more than one half, and by the time this appears in print some of those now included will have become obsolete. Examples of withdrawn classes may still be met with a few months after withdrawal on their way to breakers' yards.

It is a very comprehensive little book with a page devoted to each locomotive with a photo and all relevant data. Steam, diesel, electric, and narrow gauge are all covered, as are the railways of Ireland.

There are other sections , listing the Superintendents and CMEs, locomotive headlamp codes, liveries, shed codes, wheel arrangements, identification by number, etc.

A useful book from both a technical and historical standpoint.

I personally like the chapter on the Talyllyn, showing photos of locomotives I rode behind on my 2013 trip!

George

Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Sprintex

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Re: Two old favourites
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2014, 04:56:34 AM »
Excellent reviews George :thumbsup:


In 000 gauge, considerations of size limit the prototypes that can be modelled to acceptable standards economically, and the gauge is unlikely to offer any serious competition to the larger gauges.

How wrong can you be eh? :D

Must be second most popular now after OO/HO in its various guises :)


Paul
« Last Edit: March 14, 2014, 04:57:36 AM by Sprintex »

Online Bealman

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Re: Two old favourites
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2014, 05:04:23 AM »
Yeah, think it is, especially in America, and, I suspect, Japan. Might even be top of the list there.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2014, 05:06:04 AM by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Two old favourites
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2014, 09:46:25 AM »
I have the same Observers book, George, and an edition from 2 years earlier.
They are great little reference books :thumbsup:

 

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