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Author Topic: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)  (Read 612007 times)

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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6720 on: March 22, 2020, 07:30:33 PM »
Sofi and Giles stood outside the locked door beyond which Susan was with the three Soviets.

Suddenly there was a clicking of the lock and the door flew open to reveal … Susan.

“Sofi, Giles, run as fast as you can. I’ve set the timer and this room will very shortly implode. We’ve just got enough time to get to the back exit and out. Jeremy, get everyone outside, now!”

“No problem, Susan. Someone’s already started doing that,” replied Jeremy, adding to Rule, “tell the DJ to announce that everyone should quickly but calmly, follow us out because … there’s a gas leak!”

James Hamilton calmly stopped the record, Sam Cooke’s “Having a Party”, and made the announcement, three times. The dancers and drinkers quickly obeyed, following after Jeremy and Rule. Hamilton, pausing only to pick up his wooden boxes of 7” singles, hurried after them.

As the three ran along the corridor towards the kitchen and the loading bay, Sofi asked Susan, “Where’s the Soviets?”

“Oh, they’re all dead, Sofi. They shot each other! Come on or we'll be sucked into the implosion!”

“Shot each other?” exclaimed Sofi incredulously. Susan nodded.

“I’ll explain, later, once we’re safely out of here!”

“But the bodies? The Admiral was most insistent that, this time, he had the bodies, so his team of scientists could …” replied Giles.

“I know,” replied Susan. “But that’s not possible. No time!”

“Here’s the kitchen,” interrupted Sofi.

“This way through to the loading bay! How are we for time, Susan?”

“We’ve just enough, Giles! Keep running!”

“Get ready to shout for Poldory and the girl!”

“I can hear someone coming, Alan,” whispered Sally as they crouched just behind the stack of empty barrels with their backs to the unconscious Louis the forger.

“Yes, they told us: when you hear running, listen for the password, Unicorn, shouted three times and when you see us, run with us!”

“Unicorn! Unicorn! Unicorn!” the cries came ever louder.

Seizing Sally’s left hand, Alan pulled the young girl up. “Take a deep breath, Sally, and get ready to run for your life, girl!” She nodded, staring up at him.

Peering around the barrels, Alan saw Susan emerge from the kitchen area, closely followed by Sofi and Giles. Rising, he picked up the briefcase with his left hand.

“Run!” shouted Susan as the three approached Alan and Sally’s hiding place to be immediately followed by Alan still clasping Sally’s left hand in his right as she half-ran and was half-pulled along beside him.

They burst out onto the loading bay and paused a moment. Sofi and Giles, revolvers in hand, quickly checked around the half-open wooden doors before leaping down to crouch with their guns poised before beckoning the others to follow. Susan nimbly jumped down to squat behind Sofi.

Letting go of Sally’s hand, Alan ran down the steps, still holding the briefcase, then, putting it down, standing in front of the platform, held out his arms and ordered Sally to jump. She hesitated. Reaching up, Alan quickly grabbed her ankles and pulling her forward then downwards, caught Sally under her arms and gently placed her feet onto the ground.

“Everyone lie down!” cried Susan, “get under the edge of the loading platform! Now!”
« Last Edit: March 22, 2020, 09:52:29 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6721 on: April 12, 2020, 07:35:57 PM »
Don't worry, I will finish the previous story, soon but I needed a rather different break.

The Yardmaster Remembers

Part One

It was Easter 2000, and Bill Truscott, the much loved and highly respected, former Wadebridge Yardmaster, was relaxing in his favourite deckchair placed just in the shade of the oak tree that he had planted on the morning of his marriage over forty years ago. Next to him was a small portable table with a jug of his favourite homemade lemonade and a large tumbler from which he sipped as, his morning gardening over, he reminisced. From the open kitchen window, because it was a warm day for Spring in North Cornwall, he could hear the sounds of his wife, Lowenna, preparing their Sunday lunch. She certainly lived up to her name, he smiled, Joy, in Cornish.

Retirement, at 65 years old, from BR service, would have gone hard for him if it had not been for his very good friends in the CLPG and the GWS, who had kept him busy for another decade with part-time (Lowenna remarked it was more like full time) work in the CLPG where his organisation skills, easy way with people and contacts across BR had proven invaluable more than once. But Bill was a man who shunned the limelight, always happy for others to take the credit, and sometimes the blame, he would smile. The result was a fleet of preserved ex-BR SR and WR steam with the rolling stock to match, unparalleled in Britain, nay, the late Lord Trevelver always used to say, in the whole wide world. The Germans called it ‘plandampf’ when they took over the full timetable, Sylvia Corentyn Cador, now the new Lady Trevelver, after the death of her mother the previous winter, had explained. Sylvia and Jeremy made, he had to admit, a fine couple as Trevelver Castle’s new Lady and Lord but he missed Lady Penelope and Sir Charles and Lady Penelope’s redoubtable mother, the Dowager Lady Trevelver, that tireless post-war promoter of transport integration.

Without them, would there still be any railways, let alone a flourishing integrated public transport system, on Cornwall? Bill very much doubted it. In his time, steam had faded away, very quickly on the WR and much later on the SR. The WR’s diesel-hydraulics had come and gone, although plenty had passed into preservation to please the new generations, as had their, along with the SR’s much longer lived, diesel-electric replacements of which far fewer remained or were much missed. Now electric locos. and multiple units ran on the mainline and, thanks to advances in battery technology, the branches, too.

But it was at times like now, Easter, Christmas, and above all, Summer, that the railways once more came alive for Bill and many others when his beloved steam locos. took over, again, with their trains of immaculate chocolate and cream, crimson, crimson and cream, dark green and rich maroon liveried coaches. Specially equipped with airbrakes and coupled to ETH vans, some even worked the scheduled good services or through trains of the latest air-conditioned carriages.

Some were even worked by Bill’s absolute (but, for years, secret) favourites, the BR Standard Class 5’s. Unlike the Bulleid Light Pacifics, they made no fuss about starting even the heaviest train and accelerating away up one of the curving steep inclines of the area in thrilling style. The tremendous exhaust of the loco. echoed back to crew and passengers alike, off deep cutting sides and it seemed as though they might blow sky-high the overbridges as the engines barked their way under them. What remarkable locos. those BR Standard Class 5’s were for their size, he smiled. When capably handled as they always were by the SR crews, there seemed to be nothing they could not do, and they always seemed to be able to ‘pull something out of the bag, they thrived on hard work and the harder their crew worked them, the better they steamed. Yet, again, unlike the Bulleid Light Pacifics, they did it without being wildly extravagant on fuel.

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6722 on: April 14, 2020, 08:10:30 PM »
Part Two

‘Plandampf’ was all very fine and well, and a major tourist attraction, but, Bill couldn’t help thinking, it was not the same, indeed simply could not be the same as when, as an eager young railwayman, straight from school, with much still to learn, he had watched wonderingly the railways struggle with the traffic resulting from the tremendous increase in summer holiday travel throughout Great Britain. At the height of the post-war holiday seasons, on Saturdays, both the SR’s North Cornwall line and the WR’s West of England line had to handle the heaviest volume of passenger traffic, between Cornwall and towns in the Midlands and North of England, in their entire history. This situation reflected the continuing development of Penmayne and its lesser rival, the renowned seaside resort of Newquay, along with the smaller local resorts, such as Port Perran and Trepol Bay (plus the attraction of the beautiful coasts and countryside surrounding them) into one of the country’s best and most popular summer holiday areas. Bill smiled, again. The Trevelvers had always been a very farsighted and determined folk and Sylvia, Eli and their friends in the worlds of advertising, marketing and publicity, had done much to build further on the work of previous generations.

During the early and middle 1950s, summer Saturday holiday traffic reached a tremendous peak and both regions’ lines’ capacity was strained to the limit. But the holiday specials together with excursions outside the peak season, also ran on Easter and Whitsun, as well as August bank holidays. The excursions and specials, in particular, ran from a wide variety of places and for a variety of reasons. WR excursion trains at weekends, and on bank holidays, from Bristol and Bath to Penmayne and Newquay, were common during the summer months, as were trains from places even further afield, for example, Cheltenham, Worcester, Marton Hinmarche, and Birmingham, and as such were not really remarkable.

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6723 on: April 14, 2020, 10:22:28 PM »
 :hellosign:
   Thanks Chris a nice diversion in uncertain times, hope you are safe & well
       regards Derek.

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6724 on: April 15, 2020, 02:32:29 PM »
:hellosign:
   Thanks Chris a nice diversion in uncertain times, hope you are safe & well
       regards Derek.

Thanks, Derek. I thought it would be a nice change of pace. There's more to come (but not much more!). Yes, all is fine, here, the sun is shining and the situation has been very well managed by the Czechs.

Online port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6725 on: April 15, 2020, 03:50:51 PM »
Indeed, what a shame that there is no railway serving North Cornwall today providing, if the SR route to Wadebridge had been extended to Newquay, a wonderful alternative to the ex GW main line to the far West.
I for one would love to be able to travel by train from Redruth, via Chacewater, Perranporth, Newquay and Wadebridge, Halwill Jct etc to Bude.
Even if it did take nearly all day there and back!

If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6726 on: April 15, 2020, 06:02:55 PM »
Indeed, what a shame that there is no railway serving North Cornwall today providing, if the SR route to Wadebridge had been extended to Newquay, a wonderful alternative to the ex GW main line to the far West.
I for one would love to be able to travel by train from Redruth, via Chacewater, Perranporth, Newquay and Wadebridge, Halwill Jct etc to Bude.
Even if it did take nearly all day there and back!

I fully agree, Martin but there would have had to be a rather different economic basis (which, of course, we have in our Alternative West Country). There would have to be more people, more local industry and more tourists, including more affluent tourists and a fully integrated transport system. But, above all the sort of rational, economic operation of the railways that was all too rare in the 1960s and 1970s in real life. (With the very honourable exception of Gerry Fiennes, of course.)

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6727 on: April 15, 2020, 09:34:57 PM »
Part Three

From Bill and his SR colleagues’ point-of-view, the arrival at Exmouth Junction, in June 1952, of 3MT 2-6-2T 82010, the first of the BR Standard locos., with their labour saving devices – self-cleaning smokeboxes, rocking grates, self-emptying ashpans and easy lubrication, which required no pit to facilitate preparative and disposal duties – showed what could have contributed greatly to keeping the trains moving in North Cornwall if only more powerful BR Standards had been made available to them, back then. A late arrival on shed, his colleagues had informed him, with many ex-GWR or SR loco. types often required a reshuffling in their order of departure time from shed prior to working back. But a BR Standard loco. could arrive on shed well behind time yet depart again on its rostered diagram working. Sometimes they would be in and gone again in barely half an hour, something not possible with many locomotives unless preparation and disposal duties were badly skimped. However, the 3MTs were judged as only being suitable for use on the short passenger and goods trains on the Bude, Halwill and Okehampton line being seen only rarely on the main North Cornwall line where rather more powerful locomotives were required, apart from on the local trains where their less powerful 2MT cousins, the Ivatt 2-6-2Ts coped perfectly well having replaced the ex-GWR 57xx pannier tanks and, before them, ex-LSWR O2s. Nos. 82010 to 82019 and 82020 to 82029 were the original SR allocated batch and all were built at Swindon Works.

Bill had open his treasured hardbacked notebook where, in his spare time, he had carefully recorded the allocations of the locomotives used in North Cornwall. His memory was still excellent, but he was a man who always liked to check the details. Yes, 3MT No. 82010 had been joined in the August by Nos. 82011 to 82017, and in the September by Nos. 82018 and 82019SR , followed by Nos. 82020, 82021, 82024 and 82025, in August 1954, with the second and last batch, 82022 and 82023, in the October. However, not all of these 3MTs stayed for long at Exmouth Junction. 82014 departed in August 1952, 82015 and 82016 in October 1952, and 82012 in January 1953, all going to 71A Eastleigh, with 82020 and 82021 leaving for the LMR at 2B Nuneaton, on September 1954. The remaining engines replaced some M7s on their previous duties. Then, after a gap of eight years, in September 1962, following the arrival of the more powerful BR Standard Class 4MT 2-6-4T locomotives, all the remaining 3MT 2-6-2Ts were transferred away, Nos. 82010, 82011, 82013, 82017, 82018, 82019, 82022, 82023, 82024, and 82025, initially going to 71A Eastleigh before all ending up at 70A Nine Elms, were they worked as station pilots and on trains of empty coaching stock to and from Clapham Junction until withdrawal between 1964 and 1967. All were in the BR Lined Black livery which, in his opinion, suited the smaller BR Standards so well.

As, inevitably with the growth in car ownership, services were scaled back in Cornwall and loads got lighter there was, again, a need for the 3MTs and eight stayed for various lengths of time. The WR’s 82001 and 82002 were the first to arrive in April 1963, followed by 82040 in the October, then in March 1964, 82035 and 83039, with the last to arrive being Nos. 82030, 82042 and 82044 in the June. The WR examples brought a change of livery. 82001, 82002, 82030, 82039, and 82042 being among those carrying the Western’s very attractive livery of dark green, lined out in orange and black applied, following overhaul, from 1957; of these No. 82042 had been saved for preservation by the CLPG at Penmayne, following withdrawal in August 1965, from 85B Gloucester, after a heavy general overhaul at Eastleigh Works; whilst 82035 and 82040 were finished in the region’s unlined green when, from the early 1960s, Swindon Works had abandoned lining out, as an economy measure. Of this pair, No. 82040 was the one saved for preservation by the CLPG at Penmayne, after withdrawal, on July 1965, also from 85B Gloucester and also after a heavy general overhaul at Eastleigh Works. Both locos. were then used for short, off-peak and off-season passenger services. Bill considered that the locos. looked equally smart lined out in either livery, but rather less so in the unlined green carried latterly by a number of examples. Both were from the original WR allocated batches of 82000 to 82009, and 82030 to 82044, and built at Swindon Works. One curiosity was the WR’s No. 82031 which was allocated to Plymouth Laira from January to March 1955.

The shortest-lived in regular BR service was 82043, only 8 years 8 months old at withdrawal from Bristol Barrow Road in February 1964; the longest-lived was 82019, two months short of its fifteenth birthday when withdrawn in July 1967. The class's design life, however, was 40 years. The last two Class 3 tanks in service were nos. 82019 and 82029 at Nine Elms, withdrawn in July 1967, but four more survived until after the end of steam, Nos. 82000, 82003, 82031 and 82034 were transferred from North Wales at the end of 1966 to Patricroft shed in Manchester for use on local suburban trains. They were not really required there, however, but nevertheless they lingered there until the shed's closure in 1968. The melancholy swan song of the 82xxx's was provided by 82029 as late as July 8th 1967, when the engine was taken off station pilot duties at Waterloo and, covering for the failure of the booked locomotive, worked the 07.18 passenger turn to Salisbury as far as Basingstoke. On arrival, it was moved on to the MPD and condemned, never to turn a wheel in service again.

One alleged curiosity was 82044 which was painted in green livery by the Western Region but reported to have then been repainted in black livery after it was transferred away. During this repaint, it mistakenly received a power classification 4 numeral which it carried until withdrawal. In 1954, there were plans to build more locomotives, at Swindon, nos. 82045-82054 for the WR and 82055-82062 for the NER, however, these were cancelled. With the upgrading of routes, (the 82xxx’s being built to work within a 16½ ton axle weight), enabling much of the work they had been designed for to be undertaken by Class 4 locos., the general loss of traffic and the widespread use of DMUs, there was no longer a requirement for them.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2020, 09:29:50 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6728 on: April 16, 2020, 08:22:24 PM »
Here is a video of the smooth-running newly DCC-fitted brand new plain green BR Standard 3MT 2-6-2T, at Wickness Models, which will become Exmouth Junction's No. 82040 (83D).

https://youtu.be/h81FS_Hatr4

It is hoped that it will be running at Cant Cove in time for this yer's summer timetable.

Online port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6729 on: April 16, 2020, 08:26:50 PM »
She looks good in unlined green Chris.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6730 on: April 16, 2020, 08:40:04 PM »
She looks good in unlined green Chris.

Thanks, Martin. I agree. In real life though I don't think the livery suited theses locos. as well as lined green.

Here is the real-life BR 3MT 2-6-2T 82040 at Gloucester Horton Road shed, in the summer of 1965. The loco was withdrawn in July of that year, and, in rel-life, scrapped in October. In our Alternative Cornwall, she went to Eastleigh Works for a heavy general overhaul but kept her plain green livery after a thorough clean and repaint where necessary!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rgadsdon/17007370018


Offline tutenkhamunsleeping

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6731 on: April 16, 2020, 09:09:24 PM »
Here is a video of the smooth-running newly DCC-fitted brand new plain green BR Standard 3MT 2-6-2T, at Wickness Models, which will become Exmouth Junction's No. 82040 (83D).



I’d managed to convince myself I didn’t want one of those, then you come along and dissolve my resolve :D

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6732 on: April 16, 2020, 09:17:26 PM »
Well, Steve, if you buy one that runs as well as mine, I don't think you'll be disappointed. 8-)
« Last Edit: April 16, 2020, 09:32:35 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6733 on: April 25, 2020, 04:56:14 PM »
Part Four

Bill took another sip of cool homemade lemonade. Really, he must be getting old, there was no evidence, he reminded himself, that No. 82044 had ever left the WR, being withdrawn from Gloucester (85B) in November 1965. What was he thinking about! Turning the pages of his beautifully inscribed notebook, the former Wadebridge Yardmaster turned his thoughts to the arrival, at the WR’s Plymouth Laira, in 1954, of five of the more powerful BR Standard 4-6-0 locomotives, Class 4MT’s Nos. 75025 to 75027 in the May and 75028 and 75029 in the June; followed, at the SR’s Exmouth Junction, in September 1955, by ten other Class 4MT’s, Nos. 75070 to 75079. However, for a variety of reasons, the Class 4MT’s did not find favour either with the WR or the SR sheds.

For the SR, it was the 4MT’s 51ft. long wheelbase which, being too long for the 50ft turntables at Launceston and Bude, meant that they could not be turned. Whilst their BR1B 4,725 gallon high-sided tender was suitable for reverse running, this sort of working proved unpopular with the footplate crews. There was, thus, little suitable work for the new engines. Upon arrival, No. 75079 was quickly ‘loaned’ to Yeovil Town (72C). All ten 4MT’s departed from Exmouth Junction, in June 1956, as did all five 4MT’s from Plymouth Laira, the first two, Nos. 75027 and 75029, as early as September 1954, with No. 75025 (later to return, but to Exmouth Junction when it was under the WR, as 83D), Nos. 75026, 75028, and 75029 also leaving in June 1956.

This was not, Bill knew, the end of the 75xxxs at Exmouth Junction though as, in March 1964, the first two WR BR Standard 4MT Class 4MT’s 4-6-0s, Nos. 75005 and 75025, arrived to work the North Cornwall line, to be joined by 75022 in the April, and 75008 in the September. Nos. 75000-75049, when built, had been fitted with BR2 type inset tenders, whilst Nos. 75050-75064 had the type BR2A inset ones, and the SR’s Nos. 75065-75079, the type BR1B 4,725 gallon ones but with no spectacle plates for tender first running. These were the locos., but with the BR2 type inset tenders and double blastpipe and chimney, that some had wished had arrived far earlier, no matter how loved the ex-LSWR, (even ex-SECR counting the ‘N’ Class Moguls) and ex-SR as well as ex-GWR steam locos. were.

The four later arrivals differed from the first 4MT’s by having BR2 3,500 gallon tenders which were inset at the top to give a better look out, but Bill remembered, sadly, the footplate crews were still not impressed. All four locos. carried the lined BR Green livery favoured by the WR which suited them so well and all, except No. 75025, had double blastpipes and chimneys. Nos. 75005, 75008, 75022, and 75025, arrived to work the North Cornwall line, and were employed on passenger workings to Wadebridge, where Bill often saw them, and beyond to Penmayne, the Bude to Okehampton afternoon service, Meldon Quarry workings and goods trains to Okehampton, Penmayne, and Plymouth. The last inhabitant of Launceston shed a sub-shed of 83D Plymouth Laira to 1962) had been one of these, working the North Cornwall line in December 1964. With the closure of Exmouth Junction depot to steam, in May 1965, all four 4MT’s were transferred to Worcester (85A) in the May (Nos. 75008, 75022, and 75025) and June (No. 75005) but all were soon withdrawn in the December of the same year when that shed, too, was finally closed to steam. However, by this time, the 75xxxs had acquired enough admirers that double blast pipe and chimney fitted No. 75022, along with single chimney fitted No. 75025, were purchased from Worcester shed and taken to Eastleigh Works for a heavy general overhaul (Swindon Works having ceased such work) and a repaint in fully lined out BR Green, prior to preservation by the CLPG at Penmayne where they proved to be both popular and efficient locos.

On the WR, some 4MT 4-6-0s had, Bill recalled, worked on the Cambrian with Nos. 75020, 75023, and 75024 at Oswestry (89A) and Nos. 75001-75003, 75005 and 75007-75009 at Shrewsbury (84G). BR Standard 4MT 4-6-0s were the last steam locos. to work over the Cambrian; one of the LMR 4MT’s, No. 75033 (when Shrewsbury had become 6D) working the last up “Cambrian Coast Express”, on 4th March 1967, he had noted. Elsewhere on the Western, beside the five 4MT’s at Plymouth Laira (83D), (Nos. 75025-75029), Cardiff Canton (86C) had had a few, Nos. 75004-75009 and 75021-75022.

Of the SR batch, Bill noted, whilst Nos. 75065-75069 had gone new to Dover (74C), Nos. 75070-75079 had, as he had previously noted, been set new to Exmouth Junction (72A) from where they worked west of Exeter, especially to Plymouth via Okehampton, although by 1957 all ten had been transferred east to other parts of the SR’s South Western section. By June 1956, Nos. 75070-75072 had already been departed to Bath Green Park (71G) for working the S&D. Nos. 75072 and 75073 were to spend the rest of their working lives there before both being withdrawn from Templecombe (83G) in December 1965. No. 75071, having been moved to the LMR, at Croes Newydd (6C) in August 1964, was withdrawn from Stoke on Trent (5D), in August 1967, after transfer there in the June.

In June 1957, after draughting tests, No. 75029 was adapted and fitted with a double blastpipe and chimney at Swindon Works from where it emerged, moreover, in fully lined passenger green. The Swindon double chimney did not sit well on the loco, Bill had thought; the result being ugly spoiling the appearance of a handsome engine. Technically, however, the former Yardmaster knew that the experiment had proved a success. It had been planned to convert the whole class, but diesels were the order of the day by then and the scheme was, to Bill’s considerable regret, from the operations point of view, not carried through. Eastleigh Works, however, produced its own double chimney design, in a much neater and more handsome form, and between October 1970 (No. 75069) and November 1961 (No. 75079) all fifteen, Nos. 75065-75079 of the SR’s 75xxxs gained the home-grown double blastpipes and chimneys, improving their performance and proving popular with the footplate crews, especially when they could have these engines on lines barred to the heavier Class 5MTs. Other Class 4MTs fitted with double chimneys were No. 75003 (12/59), No. 75005 (1/62), No. 75006 (12/60), No. 75008 (9/62), No. 75020 (1962), and No. 75026 (7/62). The double chimneyed members of the class had, Bill knew, proved to be a great success on the SR, and elsewhere, where they could often be called on to perform duties normally timetabled for a 5MT. However, there were complaints of draughts in the cab, especially with tender first working.

There was little variation in their livery, though Nos. 75003, 75016, 75019, (both always LMR locos.), 75023, 75024, 75027 and 75029, he knew, carried the WR’s elegant fully lined green. As built, Bill noted, the following 4MTs were allocated to the Western Region, Nos. 75000-75009, 75020-75029, whilst Nos. 75065-75079 were to the Southern Region. When withdrawn the WR allocation was: Nos. 75000, 75001, 75003, 75005, 75007, 75008, 75022, 75025, 75072, and 75073, whilst the SR’s was: Nos. 75065-75070, and 75074-75079. There were to have been ten more of the light 4-6-0s built, for the ER, but with the Modernisation Plan of 1955 and ever encroaching dieselisation Nos. 75080-75089 had been cancelled, he sadly recalled.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2020, 12:01:04 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6734 on: April 26, 2020, 11:06:18 AM »
Bill always thought complaints about the draughty cabs of the BR Standard 4MT 4-6-0s were unjustified when previous generation engine crews had had to contend with the spartan cabs of earlier designs, such as the GWR's Dean Goods and Dukedogs.

Talking of Dukedogs, courtesy of the excellent Poppingham;

https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/91/6222-260420083028.jpeg

In the foreground, courtesy of Doctor Who's TARDIS, we see what will be 'Dukedog' in BR Black large Early Crest livery, No. 9023 on an, as yet, unidentified special working which has successfully transited a hole in the space-time continuum. As posted earlier, here, the addition of a Union Mills 'Dukedog' in BR Black large Early Crest livery was on the agenda for purchase (after discovering one was used in the Southwest) and, courtesy of John, has been duly purchased and will next go to Wickness Models for DCC-fitting, Douglas also being a big fan of UM's excellent model locos. It will then go for detailing and renumbering with a new 'plates set to No. 9023 of 82C. A number of these engines had earlier been stored in Swindon's Stock Shed for some period of time when their services on the Welsh branch lines were no longer required, the majority thereafter, unfortunately, being scrapped. Fortunately, the GWS (Bodmin) stepped in and their purchase offer, including a heavy general overhaul using the best parts from No. 9023's assembled withdrawn sisters at Swindon, was accepted

A few weeks earlier, however, in the March of 1954, No. 9023 had been used on pilot duties over the South Devon banks between Plymouth North Road and Newton Abbot, but the "experiment" was short-lived and Bill had heard that the local enginemen did not take too favourably to the use of this engine on such duties, with its exposed cab, open to all that the South Devon weather could throw at them. No. 9023 was photographed on a very short three van "Express Parcels" leaving Plymouth almost certainly returning back to its home shed at Swindon at the end of its short period in the far West. No. 9023, along with No. 9011, was then the last of its class withdrawn from Swindon in June 1957, after working various special trains, placing it conveniently after my 1956 cut-off date. No. 9023 will be a 'fair weather' engine!

The following fine photo. of No. 9023 at Swindon has been purchased to aid in the detailing work:
https://www.ebay.ie/itm/Railway-Photo-GWR-Dukedog-9023-Swindon-Works-Great-Western-4-4-0-Loco-/143232775494

A photo. of No. 9023 leaving Newton Abbott on Bristol to Plymouth Fish Train (or was it a parcels train?), 16 May 1954, taken by the late PW Gray, has been posted earlier.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2020, 11:09:14 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

 

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