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Author Topic: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)  (Read 499010 times)

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Offline Paddy

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6045 on: July 11, 2019, 09:57:35 PM »
Wow, your literary talents are wasted on this forum Chris.  You should turn all this in to a novel!  Excellent stuff.

Paddy
HOLLERTON JUNCTION (SHED 13C)
London Midland Region
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=11342.0

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6046 on: July 12, 2019, 04:58:20 PM »
:hellosign:  Thanks Chris, superb  :thumbsup:
      regards Derek

Thanks, Derek and Paddy. More next week, I hope.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 10:12:50 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6047 on: July 12, 2019, 05:08:21 PM »
'Battle of Britain' 34064 "Fighter Command" (70A Nine Elms), was later photographed at the head of a standard BR SR 3R Set formed of a BR Standard BSK+CK+BSK on a Penmayne-Wadebridge-Exter working with a tail load detached at Wadebridge and worked onto the WR.





An Extra-LWB PO Insulfish for Brixton via Bodmin Road and a non-vacuum braked ShocVan to be filled with a selection of fine West Country ales (it had already been loaded with a selection of "Castle Brewery" ales) to be worked via Trepol Bay Harbour distribution depot, Port Perran "Headland Brewery" sidings, Truro and then West Porthsea, which is is 2 miles NE of Penzance on the (G)WR mainline some miles after Truro. West Porthsea Quay is located on a short branchline from West Porthsea mainline station. From West Porthsea Quay the van will be shipped to Sonmel harbour to ensure that visitors can enjoy fine ales as well as German lagers, organised, in haste, by Lord Trevelver.

« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 09:58:47 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6048 on: July 13, 2019, 10:00:10 AM »
On their return to Trevelver Castle from their visit with the other "Chelsea Girls" to Sonmel, Sylvia and Eli had mentioned the forthcoming 'German Bier Festival' at Sonmel.

Lord Trevelver, although an experienced connoisseur of German biers from his time spent with the British Army at the end of WW2 and the early 1950s, was very concerned that any visitors to Sonmel should also have the choice of some excellent West Country ales and delegated Huw Jenkins, the Castle's Head Butler, to ring round the local breweries to fill a BR Grey (non-vacuum braked) 'ShocVan' for urgent despatch on the next (irregular service) train ferry from West Porthsea Quay to Sonmel. Fortunately, the "Castle", "Headland" and "Creech" breweries had already greatly increased production ready for the Summer holiday season and could quickly replace stock added to the 'ShocVan' at Trevelver Castle, Trepol Bay, and Port Perran.

Two other, overhauled vans (LNER and SR designs) were already on their way to Sonmel by scheduled goods services for use on the island but to get the van of best West Country ales to West Porthsea Quay in time to catch the train ferry to Sonmel, Bill Truscott, the Wadebridge Yardmaster, arranged for the van to be tripped from Trevelver Castle then added to the next passenger train calling at Cant Cove which would take it to Wadebridge where it would be added to the next passenger train to Trepol Bay where it would be quickly be removed and taken down the incline to the harbour to have further supplies loaded from the warehouse then returned to the station where it wouldl be added to the next passenger train calling at Port Perran where it would be shunted off and into the "Headland Brewery" sidings for the final consignment to be added. The now fully loaded van would then be added on the next passenger train to Truro from where it would be added to a scheduled mainline express gooods service to West Porthsea Quay and then onto the ferry to Sonmel.

Lord Trevelver was very pleased to be informed by Jenkins that everything had been organised so swiftly.

"Well done, Jenkins and my hearty thanks, as always, to Mr Truscott, too." [The Wadebridge Yardmaster.]

[For those curious how standard railway rolling stock can be safely transported to Sonmel, it can be revealed that George Enderby, the shy engineering genius who came up with the original design concept for the 15ft. Extra-Long Wheelbase goods stock which is proving such a success on the West Country "Fast Freight Network" (the now unknown, outside the SW, predecessor to BR's much later "Speedlink" concept), has developed a device composed of adjustable metal bars, chains and train ferry deck anchoring devices that the Sonmel train ferry crew promptly nicknamed the 'Iron Maiden' as it is tightly secured around the vehicle and then fixed firmly to the deck, thus preventing any movement even in the stormiest seas. Standard ferry coaches and goods stock already have fixed anchoring points attached to their underframes for the deck chains to be fixed to.]
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 10:11:55 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6049 on: July 13, 2019, 10:51:17 AM »
We now go back in time a few years, to 1958, to show one of the peak Summer Saturday special trains from Marton Hinmarche at Cant Cove en route to Penmayne. The train, formed of new WR BR Crimson & Cream BR Standard coaches, was hauled by BR BR Standard Class 5MT 4-6-0 No. 73082 "Camelot" (70A Nine Elms) that had taken over the train at Reading from the loco. which had worked the train from its departure station. The train then travelled via Basingstoke, Salisbury, Templecombe, Exeter, Okehampton, Meldon Junction, Halwill, and Launceston to Wadebridge where a portion for Trepol Bay was detached. The train was then reduced to (from rear) BSK W34139, SK W24746, RU (K) W1900, CK W15069, and BCK W21071.

Close-up showing metal "Camelot" nameplate applied by Gideon for me.



BR BR Standard Class 5MT 4-6-0 No. 73082 "Camelot" fresh from overhaul with the latest BR Crest on her tender [also applied by Gideon for me.]. [I really need to add crew in the cab.]



The CK and BCK:



The RU (K) and RFO:



The SK and BSK

« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 10:52:54 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6050 on: July 13, 2019, 11:55:08 AM »
The lovingly detailed train journey of Susan and D.C.I. Snapper to Wadebridge (where Snapper will disembark to travel with D.I. Rule to Tregonning, and meet Lord Oliver and Lady Emily Trevarnon) and Cant Cove will be continued in a day or so. Meanwhile, here is an update on some of the other characters this early Summer (1963). Sofia will be travelling up to London with Sylvia, Eli, and Susan to the Chelsea townhouse where the "Girls" live. Fermin has been invited to meet up, in London, and so has Rae Anne from Canada, but I'm not sure where those two will be staying. Catala was planning to invite the head of the Sonmel Tourist Board (STB) to Sant Pau de Mar, or somewhere else in Izaro (between France and Spain) where she lives but is now fully occupied with Christian. On their arrival back on the UK mainland, Christian and Catala have to take a train to London (Paddington) and then a taxi to the rented house of the "Chelsea Girls". But will they stay there or has Christian other plans and, if so, will Catala go along with them? 8-) The plan is that they will all go one Friday evening, to "Esmerelda’s Barn", a previously mentioned nightclub in Knightsbridge, West London, infamously owned by the Kray Twins, where DJ James Hamilton plays and which will feature prominently in the continuing story. I don't know if Rae Anne's female American friends are accompanying her, this time, and what she has been doing since last year (1962). I'll leave all that to Chris (Weave).
« Last Edit: July 14, 2019, 08:18:56 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6051 on: July 13, 2019, 03:55:50 PM »
I'm glad the special from Marton Hinmarche arrived safely.  Another and, probably, quicker route would be via the ex-GWR line from Stratford-upon-Avon to Cheltenham, switching to the ex-Midland minline from Birmingham to Bristol Temple Meads, where a loco change could be effected.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6052 on: July 13, 2019, 04:03:21 PM »
I do hope that nothing too dramatic is going to happen in sleepy little Tregonning.
All set for pictures if required.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Milton Rail

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6053 on: July 13, 2019, 05:20:01 PM »
Great storylines Chris, very detailed and enthralling - the photo's are not half bad either

Staff at the Tullibardine are hastily preparing another shipment, but are nervous about how to send it securely given the incident at Cant Cove.... they are currently in discussion with the transport police about what security arrangements could be put in place, it may even be a job for the military contacts that Lord Trevelver has .... telegrams have been dispatched

Offline cornish yorkie

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6054 on: July 13, 2019, 05:43:46 PM »
 :hellosign:
 Got to agree with Andrew, superb photos of Camelot.
I do hope that nothing too dramatic is going to happen in sleepy little Tregonning.
All set for pictures if required.

Go on Martin, please tell us more ?
      regards Derek.

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6055 on: July 14, 2019, 07:57:12 AM »
I'm glad the special from Marton Hinmarche arrived safely.  Another and, probably, quicker route would be via the ex-GWR line from Stratford-upon-Avon to Cheltenham, switching to the ex-Midland mainline from Birmingham to Bristol Temple Meads, where a loco change could be effected.

Thanks, Lawrence. The late 1950s peak summer periods (Saturdays in the six peak weeks in July and August) were the busiest ever on BR WR's lines to the West. Saturday 27th July 1957 was recorded as the busiest and most chaotic of them all. Not knowing that the peak had already been reached, the following year, BR WR Control was keen to get the train 'off region' as quickly as possible so routing it onto the SR via Reading was agreed. (From an SR perspective, 1957-59 was the peak in terms of mileage operated, but I've no evidence about loadings. A little tinkering at the edges took place (running a peak relief one week less if it hadn't loaded well..., and in the next couple of years a couple of Waterloo trains went all together, but I would put 1963 as when more serious cuts began, before Beeching began to make an impact.) The ex-GWR line from Stratford-upon-Avon to Cheltenham and the ex-Midland mainline from Birmingham to Bristol Temple Meads were both full with NW to SW holiday trains. When the train reached Exeter it was given the path of a scheduled local train (the SR did do this) which meant plenty of stops at isolated country stations and the locals having to stand in the corridors or in the guard's van! At least they could get a drink or three in the restaurant car (very unusual West of Exeter on BR SR except for twp trains on Summer Saturdays). But, for Paddington, the train was no longer their problem. 70A Nine Elms had a spare BR Standard 5MT and the local crews at Salisbury and Exeter were used to them.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2019, 12:08:23 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6056 on: July 14, 2019, 07:58:52 AM »
:hellosign:
 Got to agree with Andrew, superb photos of Camelot.
I do hope that nothing too dramatic is going to happen in sleepy little Tregonning.
All set for pictures if required.

Go on Martin, please tell us more?
      regards Derek.

All I can reveal is that it involves a prize racehorse and an alleged London East End betting ring!

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6057 on: July 14, 2019, 08:01:53 AM »
Great storylines Chris, very detailed and enthralling - the photo's are not half bad either

Staff at the Tullibardine are hastily preparing another shipment, but are nervous about how to send it securely given the incident at Cant Cove.... they are currently in discussion with the transport police about what security arrangements could be put in place, it may even be a job for the military contacts that Lord Trevelver has .... telegrams have been dispatched

Thanks, Andrew. For the moment, shipments have reverted to using BR ex-LNER vacuum-braked 'Fruit' vans. The locals refer to them as 'Fruit of the Barley' vans! Security arrangements are being agreed with Giles Roskrow, the Chelsea wine and spirits importer (who is ex-SAS).

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6058 on: July 14, 2019, 08:23:18 AM »
I do hope that nothing too dramatic is going to happen in sleepy little Tregonning.
All set for pictures if required.

Thanks, Martin. I'll email you, tomorrow (Tuesday). All I can reveal is that it involves a prize racehorse and an alleged London East End betting ring! Only suspicious non-locals being seen, nothing too dramatic and certainly no explosives, unlike at Wadebridge!
« Last Edit: July 15, 2019, 08:58:21 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #6059 on: July 17, 2019, 08:18:06 PM »
Back on the footplate, the performance of the ‘Merchant Navy’ on the switchback climb to the summit of Honiton Bank is outstanding. The line climbs from Feniton towards Honiton at 1 in 100 and then continues up to the tunnel mouth on slightly steeper gradients before then dropping at 1 in 80 down to Seaton Junction.

The location of the station created a major problem for westbound trains stopping at Seaton Junction since it was situated at the start of a six miles climb (at 1 in 80) to the summit of the line in the tunnel under Honiton Hill, a very straight tunnel which, at 1,345-yards (1,230 m) long, was the longest on the LSWR. It will take the train only a couple of minutes to pass through it. Only one man – crushed to death by a fall of rock – was killed in its construction. It took nearly 12 million bricks to line this tunnel!

The bank, although no steeper than some the newspaper train had already overcome, is more severe by virtue of its length: seven miles, most at 1 in 80, to the summit inside the west end of Honiton tunnel. There is no question of rushing this bank by momentum, and it is, the guard reflects, a tribute to the quality of the motive power supplied for the line by successive locomotive designers that there is no provision for assisting engines.

Past Hangman’s Corner and the train is down to 70mph; under the main road at Blacksands Bridge, on the steepest part of the bank, down to 60mph. The line crosses the Umborne Brook on a left-hand curve and ahead, before Honiton Tunnel, in a delightful hillside setting, on the north side of the line, is the diminutive Honiton Incline signalbox that breaks up the long section between Honiton and Seaton Junction to keep trains on the move. If it was day, the fireman would have exchanged greetings with its signalman as the train steamed past. Despite the cool night air, the fireman is still finding it a bit hot, but the ‘Merchant Navy’ has the train well in hand; speed is stabilising at about 50mph, boiler pressure is 220lb/sq in and with full open regulator the steam-chest pressure is 208lb/sq in. The wooded valley sides are closing in. In fact, as the crew know, the train is in a man-made cutting, whose slopes with a century of tree growth on them merge indistinguishably with the natural contours.

Honiton Tunnel (eastern entrance)
http://www.umborne.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/image0-0072.jpg

Round a slight right-hand curve, the black slightly squashed semi-circle tunnel mouth appears for a few seconds before the train storms into it. With nowhere else to go, the exhaust steam billows into the cab, enveloping the crew in a cloud turned orange by the merciless firelight. Outside, in the deeper darkness, the series of whipcracks from the chimney hammers at the tunnel roof in a succession of shock waves, felt rather than heard. The experienced loco. crew work calmly in the midst of this inferno, the driver holding the regulator handle in case she should slip. His mate adjusts the injector. Honiton Tunnel is perpetually wet; the chalky soil which grows splendid beech trees up above allows moisture to percolate down below requiring constant vigilance from the civil engineering maintenance staff. Knowing this, great care is applied throughout and a small slip, due to the wet, is immediately rectified without a problem.

Speed was a creditable 40mph plus when the train entered Honiton Tunnel, as the ‘Merchant Navy’ reaches the slightly easier 1 in 132 gradient in the tunnel the engine begins to speed up; after about 45 seconds the driver begins easing her and, as the night train emerges from the tunnel’s west portal, he almost shuts the regulator. He sets the reverser to its coasting position at 45%, marked by a ‘D’ on the scale (it is neither necessary nor desirable to put a Bulleid loco. into full gear when coasting, as large steam passages and 11in diameter piston valves enable her to run freely at any cut-off). With the falling gradient of 1 in 90 now very much in its favour speed increases from 45mph to 60mph as the train gathers speed on the long curve from the tunnel mouth to the town of Honiton lying below the hill in the valley of the River Otter.

The injector had gone full on when the train left Honiton Tunnel, to pull up the water level, which as a result of a reversal of gradient and closing the regulator, has dropped to a quarter of a glass, and to hold down the boiler pressure which has risen quickly to the red line. She does not blow-off – that is boiler control. The fireman puts the doors half shut and adjusts the blower so that it is just clearing the smoke. The fire should not need any further attention apart from levelling down with the pricker until she arrives on Exmouth Junction shed, although the fireman stays vigilant to the fire’s condition in case it should start to go down unexpectedly; things can happen fast on a big locomotive at speed.

Honiton is the largest town in these parts, a focal point for rural industries, and receives four extra passenger trains and three goods workings coming out from Exeter each day. Although the train will soon be approaching Honiton station, the driver has no need to ease the loco. right back because, just like the “ACE”, the newspaper train does not stop there. Instead, it powers on through with the loco’s whistle open and just a breath of steam on to cushion the Pacific’s moving parts. Both men find something to hold on to, as there is a diamond crossing in the down line which causes their mighty steed to give a violent kick as she passes over it.

Honiton station was opened by the LSWR in 1860, along with its Exeter Extension from Yeovil Junction to Exeter Queen Street. The station was designed by William Tite and the main building is on the westbound platform, even though this is the side furthest from the town centre. It stands on an embankment on the west side of New Street with its goods yard and small goods shed on the south side beyond the station building. There are further sidings on the north side of the line opposite the main goods yard. In 1957, a new signal box, at the Exeter end of the station on the south side of the line, replaced the one built in 1875 which was on the opposite side of the tracks.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2019, 04:10:51 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

 

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