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Author Topic: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)  (Read 536594 times)

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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5775 on: March 07, 2019, 08:50:03 PM »
Bill Truscott, the Wadebridge yardmaster, was very pleased to hear on the 'railway grapevine' how well Eddie Bligh and Andrew Parks were getting on at Trepol Bay. The story on the 'grapevine' was that they were on an exchange with a pair of BR SR men sent to Penmayne as part of the amalgamation of the two region's operations  and, indeed, such a pair had turned up at the BR SR shed, at Penmayne, only to be directed to the brand new BR WR diesel shed, opposite, designed by the same architect as the far larger one at Plymouth Laira. There they had commenced training on a North British Type 2 coupled to a WR "Toad" brake van much to their disgust.

Satisfied with the reports of Driver Bligh's handling of Trepol Bay's small BR Green Drewry 204 bhp diesel shunter, D2290, Bill completed a requisition form that he had already on his desk, approved by Arthur Angove, the Wadebridge shedmaster, for the transfer of a more recent Drewry, (No. D2283, he had been told), to be sub-shedded at Wadebridge but stationed at Cant Cove. Placing the form in the requisite envelope, he placed it in the railway internal post. With the preserved Z Class 0-8-0T No. 30956 back from a heavy general overhaul at Eastleigh Works he felt sure that he could cope with the coming extra Easter traffic. By summer, 7446 (83E) should also be back from its heavy general overhaul at Swindon Works, as a backup to D2283 or the WR BR built equivalents. Then there were the big BR diesel-electric shunters, one of which, in less pristine condition, was already allocated to Wadebridge and, often seen at Trepol Bay. More than enough, he reflected, sipping his strong tea from an SR mug. And that was without all the preserved CLPG and GWS locos., whose number was steadily increasing. He was a happy man and the Fat Controller had dealt with him very fairly, too.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2019, 09:10:33 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5776 on: March 08, 2019, 04:57:18 PM »
Next morning, the two railwaymen were not to be disappointed, the breakfast was wonderful as was the freshly ground coffee.
Just as Eddie Bligh went to get up from the table ready for work a thought struck him, “I didn’t know you were a whisky expert Andrew”.
“What do you mean?” , replied the guard.
“Well, you seemed to know all about the flavour and smell of that nightcap in the bar last night” added Bligh.
Andrew Parks roared. “Oh Eddie, I know nothing about whisky except that I like it. I was merely repeating what was written on the label”.
“You bugger” scowled Eddie Bligh, “ You had me fooled”.
With that the pair set off for work which consisted of another day refining their skills with the little diesel mechanical shunter and getting to grips with shunting the harbour incline.
In fact, that set the pattern on both Tuesday and Wednesday then Thursday would be their last working day before returning to Wadebridge on Friday for a well earned weekend off.

Ted Tompkins kept a watchful eye on proceedings over the next two days  and was most satisfied with what he witnessed. He was well aware that Parks was an experienced guard but needed to update his skills around shunting and train composition. Similarly Ted knew that driver Bligh was a top rate engineman as far as steam locomotives were concerned. He had some experience with the new hydraulic Baby Warships recently introduced into Cornwall but needed a bit more practise  with  other types of diesel locomotives, especially where shunting was concerned. Tompkins knew that diesels were taking over and that these days it was increasingly important that drivers got used to handling the different types as they appeared.

Controller Wickham had made it clear to both Parks and Bligh that they were being sent to Trepol Bay as a punishment. However, the controller had a vision of the bigger picture  in mind and he saw Parks and Bligh as part of that picture.
Hence, on Thursday, he would be travelling up to Trepol Bay from Plymouth in style. He had originally planned to have a new locomotive sent over to Trepol Bay for trials  late on Wednesday but there had been a delay in the engine being delivered to Plymouth from Bristol.
The locomotive would now be driven up from Plymouth light engine by driver Tommy Endacott first thing on Thursday morning with William Wickham on board.  It would be Wickham’s first experience of this type of loco,  an experience that he was very much looking forward to. In fact, no  locomotive of this class had ever entered Cornwall before, in fact they were even rare in Devon.

Parks and Bligh of course were blissfully unaware that they would be in for a surprise on Thursday morning. The Fat Controller planned to meet the pair at the harbour entrance as they clocked on for duty and he hoped that the surprise would be a pleasant one for the two railwaymen.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5777 on: March 08, 2019, 05:05:43 PM »
So.......any guesses as to the locomotive type being sent up to Trepol Bay from Plymouth?
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5778 on: March 08, 2019, 08:30:17 PM »
So.......any guesses as to the locomotive type being sent up to Trepol Bay from Plymouth?

Tempting though it is, Martin, to suggest some lovely steam locomotives, to be true to the story it's much more likely to be a diesel.

Beyer Peacock has been busy of late building what are, I believe, called 'Hymeks'.  Will it be one of these?

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5779 on: March 08, 2019, 08:38:06 PM »
So.......any guesses as to the locomotive type being sent up to Trepol Bay from Plymouth?

Tempting though it is, Martin, to suggest some lovely steam locomotives, to be true to the story it's much more likely to be a diesel.

Beyer Peacock has been busy of late building what are, I believe, called 'Hymeks'.  Will it be one of these?

John
Thanks for that guess John
You’ll have to wait and see.
Unfortunately, I’m up in Bristol tomorrow so you probably have to wait until Sunday unless I end up typing the story on the train home tomorrow.
Martin
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline weave

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5780 on: March 09, 2019, 12:31:03 AM »
Hi Martin,

Can't guess as wouldn't have a clue but looking forward to more of the story and pics.

If you're doing tomorrow what I think you're doing, you be careful of them 'Marching All Together' Crew. They be a bit feisty they be!

Cheers weave  :beers:

PS Sorry Chris (IP) for slight hijack.

Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5781 on: March 09, 2019, 08:09:24 AM »
Hi Martin,

Can't guess as wouldn't have a clue but looking forward to more of the story and pics.

If you're doing tomorrow what I think you're doing, you be careful of them 'Marching All Together' Crew. They be a bit feisty they be!

Cheers weave  :beers:

PS Sorry Chris (IP) for slight hijack.
Haha...Yes , of course I’m  off to the football.
I’ll stay well clear of those Leeds lads.
Long day....leave home 8.20ish to catch the 08.52 off Redruth station and get home 09.30ish this evening.
Sorry Chris (IP) we’ll shut up about football now!
« Last Edit: March 09, 2019, 08:10:26 AM by port perran »
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5782 on: March 09, 2019, 10:46:58 AM »
My money would be on a lovely shiny green "Hymek", too, on loan for crew training. The first 'Hymek', number  D7000, having been introduced into service in 1961, but they were rare west of Plymouth. D7000, was handed over to the Western Region on the 16th May 1961 in a ceremony at Paddington station, almost two months ahead of schedule; however, the last 'Hymek' number D7100 was held up until February 1964, after problems at Beyer Peacock, Gorton caused a delay in delivery for almost twelve months. They were probably the most reliable and successful of all the diesel-hydraulics. Plymouth Laira Hymeks (a few were allocated there, but not from new) ventured into Cornwall a few times, but it was rare. D7100, for one, reached Penzance.

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5783 on: March 09, 2019, 11:12:04 AM »
The Wadebridge yardmaster was recalling his conversation with the ‘Fat Controller’, William Wickham.

“Do you think Driver Bligh and Guard Parks will be OK dealing with the . . . Trepol Bay Harbour incline, Mr. Wickham?”

“Ah, Bill, I can well understand your concern. I have no worries at all on their account. Trepol Bay Harbour Chargehand, Ted Tompkins, there, is a most reliable man. He has arranged to take them, first, in one of the Wadebridge ex-LMS 20-ton brake vans, with which Parks is already very familiar, behind the Drewry, pointing out all the that they both will need to remember before their first trip with one of the regular ex-SECR 20-ton brake vans specially allocated for the incline. Like the ex-GWR “Toad” brake vans, with which Parks is most familiar, the pair of ex-SECR brake vans are fitted with sanders as well as a very powerful hand brake and Parks will need to become very familiar with the correct working of those. As, alas, you’re all too familiar, Bill, runaways can all too easily occur . . . There is, as you also know, only one line which is even steeper and that is Cant Cove’s Castle branch where, until the Z arrived from Exmouth Junction, two locos. and or two “Toads” were required fore and aft on every train, especially on return trips. We all recall the runaway that resulted in the abandoned ex-LMS 20-ton brake van next to the headshunt.”

"Yes, indeed, Mr. Wickham."

“But, the Trepol Bay Incline runaway brings me back to you and your part in this recent most regrettable event.”
« Last Edit: March 09, 2019, 11:13:05 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5784 on: March 10, 2019, 03:55:46 PM »
Back at Trepol Bay, Tuesday and Wednesday of that first week passed in a flash and by Wednesday late afternoon, driver Blligh and Guard Parks were fully competent in working both the harbour incline and the rather complicated network of sidings to the West of Trepol Bay station.
Over breakfast on the Thursday Eddie Bligh had a sudden though, “Andrew, all this working the harbour incline here, you don’t think that Mr Wickham is preparing us for working that fearsome incline at Cant Cove ? I’ve heard that it worries the two lads working it currently”.
“I hadn’t thought about that”, replied Andrew Parks, “ but it is possible. It’s certainly possible. I’ve also heard a rumour, from one of the local lads, that a new contract has been signed with a few companies in Devon requiring shipment of perishable goods of some sort between South Devon and Cornwall. The local lad swears it involves a fairly tightly timed schedule and frequent shunting manouevres at local stations. I wonder if we’ve also been shortlisted for that?”.
“I dunno”, mumbled Bligh, “That Mr Wickham certainly plays his cards close to his chest. Anyway, finish up that coffee or we’ll be late on duty”.
Ten minutes later the two of them set off for the harbour as usual. A stroll which took them past the little engine shed at Trepol Bay.
They were used to seeing an ex GW prarie tank or a pannier tank gently hissing outside the shed, or even occasionally an ex SR N Class Mogul.
“What’s the betting that it’ll be a prarie on shed this morning”, grinned Andrew Parks, “It’s a lovely Spring day. I wouldn’t mind a trip over to Truro , you on the footplate and me in the guard’s van perhaps with a few vans in tow. Nothing to arduous, just a gentle little potter”.
“Aye, that’d make a nice end to the week fo us”, chirped Eddie Bligh, “But, I guess it’s more work on the little shunter.  Never mind, the weekend is nearly here”.
With that the two of then rounded the corner towards the engine shed.
“What’s that?”, exclimed Eddie.
“Blimey” replied Guard Parks, “it’s big and it’s green. I’ve never seen one of them before. I don’t know what it is”.
Almost immediately, Ted Tompkins hurried towards them, “Good morning lads, and what a lovely morning it is. What do you think of this beauty then?”
The eyes of all theee men were by now firmly fixed on the locomotive and the unmistakable figure of William Wickham standing by her side.......
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 08:05:08 AM by port perran »
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5785 on: March 10, 2019, 07:08:19 PM »
DFEDFE06-DCC9-481A-82A2-561663B6FD7C by martin scane, on Flickr
Time stood still for a few long seconds as everyone moved clear to allow a 45xx prarie tank to gently pass by.
Then, all was revealed.  A brand new Hymek (Well done John and Chris) standing on shed with William Wickham in typical pose, hands clasped behind his back, and Ted Tompkins near the shed door lookng on.
Eddie Bligh in light coloured overalls and Andrew Parks look on, transfixed.
“What a machine” whispered Eddie, “I’ve never seen anythin’ like it”.
“Nor me”, replied Andrew, “It’s amazing”........”What is it exactly?”.......

[Sorry about the wonkey water column

If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5786 on: March 10, 2019, 08:16:58 PM »
Many thanks, Martin. This must be the first ever visit of a "Hymek" to Trepol Bay. 8-)

The first 19 Hymeks D7000-18 were originally in BR Green livery with no warning panel and had the warning panel added later.

According to "Bodmin and Wadebridge 1984-1978", Fairclough and Wills (1979) one "Hymek" No. D7032 (interestingly allocated to Cardiff Canton from new, in 1962, until September 1965) also visited Wadebridge on a North Cornwall trial on 6 January 1965 so I think you can definitely justify at least one Plymouth Laira allocated one on your West  Cornwall layout.

The first "Hymeks" were not transferred to Plymouth Laira (84A) until April 1964 when D7027, D7028, D7072, D7073 were transferred from Bristol Bath Road (82A), although they were always rare west of Plymouth. However, there were visitors before this. From the summer of 1962, one “Hymek” was stationed at Newton Abbot for regular freight workings to and from Rogerstone. This enabled the local crews to familiarise themselves with the type, which then began to appear in increasing numbers. Bristol “Hymeks” worked regular freight turns to Exeter and Hackney yards, also from Taunton to Minehead, and they were turned out in large numbers on summer Saturday passenger workings, notably to or from the Kingswear branch. [So, with a little application of "Rule One", a Bristol "Hymek" could be seen west of Exeter.]

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5787 on: March 10, 2019, 10:06:28 PM »
The shedmaster recalls . . .

“But, the Trepol Bay Incline runaway brings me back to you and your part in this recent most regrettable event.”

“Ah, yes, Mr. Wickham.”

“You’re a very hard man to criticise, Bill. You are universally respected and, without a doubt, the best-known railwayman in North and West Cornwall. Whenever anyone has a problem, they, automatically, look to you to help them solve it, whether it be the Wadebridge stationmaster, the Wadebridge shedmaster, or ordinary railwaymen like Driver Bligh and Guard Parks, who came to you with a problem. You are renowned as a problem solver, someone who can, seemingly, conjure stock out of thin air! They had a trainload of cold, tired passengers and no train to take them. The weather was very cold and windy, sleet was falling, and more snow could well have been in the offing. You knew many of those passengers and many of them knew you. However, not only did you have no serviceable brake end passenger coach of any description to hand but not one serviceable goods brake van either. Such were the consequences of the ‘Big Freeze'! Guard Parks knew the rules, as did Driver Bligh and your good self. What a dilemma!”

“Yes, it was, Mr. Wickham.”

“You knew that was an in-service brake end coach at Trepol Bay but there was no loco. available to bring it to Wadebridge. The rostered loco. and coach could have gone forward from Wadebridge as ECS to Trepol Bay, collected the brake end and returned. But none of you wanted to abandon your passengers not knowing if the train would be able to return for them. No ‘buses were running.”

“That’s right, Mr. Wickham.”

“There were no taxis to be had, for many miles, either, for love nor money.”

“That’s correct, Mr. Wickham, I called everywhere.”

“So, Driver Bligh and Guard Parks stood in this very office and asked you for your advice. I can picture them standing, nervously twisting their caps whilst young fireman Davie Thomas tried to stay out of the icy blast whilst tending the Small Prairie. No-one knows more about running a railway than you, Bill Truscott. Indeed, if it had not been for your terrible accident, caused by you, very typically and commendably, running after a runaway goods train on Trepol Bay Harbour incline to try to pull down the brake levers, you might well be seating here, today, in my place, having worked your way up through every department. Instead, you’re sitting here, with your crippled leg and fine oak walking stick presented by the company. Ah, Bill, what am I to do with you? Although not one person has said a word against you, I know that it was you that persuaded Guard Parks and, less importantly, Driver Bligh, to take that train out after running through with them how to do their utmost to ensure its safe operation.”

“That I did, Mr. Wickham. Guard Parks, knowing the rulebook, by heart, was not an easy man to persuade but I told him it was a single trip and a short and safe one at that.”

“But Guard Parks was new to the area and very anxious to get along with his new colleagues. Driver Bligh was very confident of his fine loco’s ability to brake the train and knew the route like the back of his hand. His fireman was young, keen, and sharp-eyed. It was most unlikely that anything would go wrong . . . and it didn’t. Nevertheless, you had ‘phoned each signalbox on the way to alert them of this most unusual – and completely against the rules – working. No train was more carefully watched nor run. And, yet . . . ”

“Rules are rules, Mr. Wickham.”

“Indeed, Bill. You are a long-serving Methodist lay preacher. What does the Good Book have to say on the subject of rules?”

The Yardmaster furrowed his broad forehead, under his close-cut silver hair, for a brief moment then replied. “Joshua 1:8 comes to mind, Mr. Wickham. Yes, Joshua Chapter 1 Verse 8 is most apt.”

“Good. Please, continue, Bill.”

“This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.”

“Indeed, that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. . . and then you will have good success, is most apposite. But, that was not the case. They did not do according to all that is written in it, did they? And you helped persuade them not to!”

“No, Mr. Wickham, they did not and, yes, I did.”

The ‘Fat Controller’ sighed. “You are far too valuable a railwayman to move from your position, here. Nor, with your injury, would it be easy to find you a suitable position elsewhere and if I did, I would, more than likely cause such an uproar that the complaints would be heard in Paddington let alone Plymouth! Not to mention bringing the formidable Lady Trevelver to my office! No, you, just like the others did wrong, very wrong, but for the very best of reasons . . . providing a service to your passengers.”

“Thank you, Mr. Wickham. Ever since I joined the Southern Railway as a lad of fourteen, straight from school, my parents being poor you see, to be a railwayman was always my ambition and, of course . . .

“A good Christian gentleman,” quietly added the General Manager. ”And no-one has ever had any doubt on that score, Bill Truscott.”

“So, this is my decision; unless you want a formal hearing, at Plymouth HQ?”

“No, Mr. Wickham. Everyone knows you to be a most fair man. I will accept whatever punishment you deem appropriate for I freely admit that it was me that persuaded those two excellent railwaymen to break the rules and take that train out.”

“Good. So, this is my decision, Bill. It will very neatly solve two problems in what, I feel sure, you will agree is a most equitable way. Just as with Driver Bligh and Guard Parks not a word of this must be spoken to anyone else, ever. There will, again, just like with Driver Bligh and Guard Parks, be no written record of the incident in question or the punishment decided.”

"You have my word."

“You are a widower, yes, and live alone?”

“Alas, so, Mr. Wickham, my dear Gracie passed away in the ‘51 ‘flu epidemic.”

“Ah, I’m so sorry, I knew that you were a widower, Bill, but not the cause. I recall that my medical doctor cousin, Anthony, told me that the 1951 influenza epidemic caused an unusually high death toll in England; in particular, weekly deaths in Liverpool even surpassed those of the 1918 pandemic. Very tragic.”

“It was a very dark time for us, Mr. Wickham, but the good Lord provides. My tastes are simple and I have all that I need. I neither smoke nor drink alcohol.”

“I’m very glad to hear that, Bill, for my punishment will, therefore, be a burden which, although heavy, will, I’m sure, be one that you will be able to bear.”
« Last Edit: March 10, 2019, 10:43:19 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5788 on: March 11, 2019, 11:40:42 AM »
It was late afternoon of the Saturday after the visit of the ‘Fat Controller’ to Wadebridge and his meeting with Yardmaster Bill Truscott, Driver Bligh and Guard Parks. All was quiet in Wadebridge Yard. The well loaded 4.40pm goods to Exmouth Junction, behind a rather grimy ‘N’ Mogul returning to its home shed, had departed, on time. The 5.07pm arrival from Waterloo (departure 11.00am) would soon be arriving. Taking up his walking stick, the Yardmaster had one last look around his office, everything was neat and tidy and the corner coal stove already cooling. He turned off the lights and slowly locked the hut door. For the rest of the day there would only be the BR SR and WR local services until the final, 10.43, SR departure to Penmayne, formed of a 2P set hauled by one of Wadebridge (72F/84E) shed’s pair of Ivatt tanks, 41275 and 41295, allocated there from the January of 1963. [They were to last to June 1964.]

At 5.17pm, the through portion to Penmayne of the Waterloo, just a lightly loaded Bulleid CK and a Bulleid BSK, in March, would depart behind a clean ‘N’ on its leisurely nine-minute journey. Before that though, the BR SR Green BR Standard BCK would be shunted off the back off the Waterloo and added to a through WR train to Truro, a BR Lined Maroon Collett design CK plus BSK, by a squat North British Type 2. The Yardmaster carefully picked his way across the yard and up the platform ramp to where he knew the door to the First Class compartments of the SR BCK would be. Being in possession of a BR staff privilege pass was a luxury the Yardmaster always appreciated. Today, though, he had used it to buy a 1st Class ticket for the price of a 2nd so that he would not have to show his pass bearing his name and rank.

The 5.07 drew in, precisely on time, behind a fairly clean Bulleid Light Pacific which had taken over the now shortened train at Exeter Central. Warmly dressed passengers got out and got in. A porter checked that no-one was in the wrong portion. The WR diesel slowly backed its two coaches onto the back of the SR train and gently halted. A shunter nimbly appeared, from the trackside, and swiftly connected the mismatched BCK to the CK. The Yardmaster boarded and settled in the first, empty 1st Class compartment. A laughing, well-dressed young couple passed his compartment as they made their way to the next 1st Class compartment after the man had checked with the porter that this was, indeed, the train for Trepol Bay. There were a few 2nd Class passengers in the rest of the SR coach. More local passengers entered the two familiar ageing WR coaches, glancing at surprise at the shiny new green interloper, a result of the new combined WR and SR operational arrangements.

Doors were slammed, the WR guard blew his whistle and waved his green flag. The station starter was raised, the driver gave a hoot on the loco.’s horn before it smoothly accelerated its three coaches on their way. Bill Truscott closed his eyes and rested until the guard, walking down the coaches’ corridors, announced “Trepol Bay, Trepol Bay, next stop”. Rising stiffly, Bill slowly put on his overcoat, scarf and hat then picked up his sturdy walking stick. The train slowed to a halt and, along with other passengers, the Yardmaster got out, gave his return ticket to the ticket collector for inspection and punching, then, pocketing his ticket, again, left the station.

It was not far, he knew, to Trepol Bay’s renowned “Station Hotel” where he had a very confidential meeting with Tom Tridinnick, the landlord. Entering the small hotel and passing the well-filled warm and cosy wood-panelled interior of its front bar and dining room, Bill quickly made his way to the small reception desk at the back, where Alice Tridinnick, the landlady, took his outer garments and ushered him into the back office where her husband was waiting. A freshly made pot of tea, two fine china cups and saucers with matching sideplates and a larger plate of hot, buttered scones were waiting. Greetings were exchanged, hands shaken, then the two men seated themselves. Alice quietly closed the door. Laughter drifted back from the front bar.

Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5789 on: March 11, 2019, 05:18:17 PM »
Back at Trepol Bay it’s early on Thursday morning....

Eddie Bligh and Andrew Parks are standing transfixed staring at the big diesel on shed.
William Wickham and Ted Tompkins strolled over the tracks towards the pair.
“What do you think?” , said Wickham, “A fine looking locomotive I think you must agree”.
Eddie Bligh couldn’t prevent himself from staring, fixedly, at the Hymek, “It’s certainly impressive but what exactly is it doing here?”.
“A good question”, replied the Controller, “And one which I will answer in detail very soon. First though, I’d like to invite the pair of you over to Truro. We’ll all ride over in the cab of this lovely Hymek and I’ll treat you to lunch, you too Ted. Ralph will drive the loco , it’ll be a chance to see how easy the controls are. I believe you have a couple of shunting turns to complete here so let’s say we meet up at 11-00 back here at the shed”.
The next two hours or so passed slowly, Eddie and Andrew mulling everything over in their heads and wondering what on earth was afoot.
“This is all a whirlwind Eddie”, said Andrew Parks, “It doesn’t make sense to me. We were sent here as a punishment yet we’re put up in a classy hotel with breakfast and evening meal and now we’re off to Truro for lunch with the big boss”.
“Aye, it makes no sense to me”, mused Eddie Bligh, “I’m wondering what tis all about. It’s a very strange thing, very strange indeed, strange and a tad worrying”.
Eventually, at 11.00 all four men, plus driver Ralph Elkins, who had brougt  the Hymek up from Plymouth, gathered outside the loco shed at Trepol Bay.
The Hymek was ticking over gently in the background as William Wickham announced,  “Right lads, all aboard. Let’s have a ride to Truro. I’ve booked lunch at Mannings Hotel. We’ll take a cab down into town from the station. By all accounts they serve some darned good food in there”.
“Mannings”, though Eddie Bligh, “ Mannings, Blimey, that’s far too posh for the likes of us”...........
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 05:26:43 PM by port perran »
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


 

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