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Author Topic: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)  (Read 511631 times)

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Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5580 on: January 04, 2019, 08:56:24 AM »
While on the subject of Christmas, at the suggestion of Wally Percival, Baron Tiverton is thinking about inviting his friends from Cornwall and the West Country for his Christmas house party next Christmas.  To this end, he is making arrangements for Tiverton Castle to take a rake of WR chocolate and cream coaches to collect them.  The train will leave Marton Hinmarche on 22nd December, ready to collect the guests the following day, the locomotive having been turned in readiness for its return journey.  There is a convenient link between the Aylesbury and Worcester and the former GWR route from Leamington Spa to Gloucester.  The train will cross from the former GWR lines to the former Midland Railway lines to the south of Leckhampton and then proceed via Bristol Temple Meads.  Baron Tiverton will send out the invitations early in the new year to give everyone concerned plenty of time to make their forward arrangements.  There will be plenty of first class accommodation and a restaurant car, with all the first class accommodation being set up for dining.  Those travelling second class will be able to dine in the restaurant car and, if necessary, the second class coach adjacent to the restaurant car will be set for dining as well.
Good idea Laurence. We shall have ample time to prepare. My only problem will be........remembering in 11 months time.  :D
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5581 on: January 04, 2019, 08:59:37 AM »
Good idea Laurence. We shall have ample time to prepare. My only problem will be........remembering in 11 months time.  :D
As long as you can still remember in 11 minutes time you're probably in the same boat as the rest of us. :doh:
With kind regards
Laurence
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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5582 on: January 04, 2019, 09:56:27 AM »
Thank you, Laurence and Martin. As we're quite flexible abut years and, from the backstory point-of-view, it makes more sense, (everyone will already know each other in 1962), let's agree that it will be Saturday, 23rd December 1961. 1961 and 1962 are our two favourite years for train operating and fit closer with your preferred year, Laurence. That also fits better with the use of a rake of WR Chocolate and Cream coaches and the use of WR steam rather than diesel locos. (In 1962, Stanley Raymond was appointed WR General Manager with instructions to break up the WR's Chocolate and Cream named express rakes and enforce the use of regular BR Maroon stock.) We all have a good rake of WR Chocolate and Cream coaches, though, but only I, I think, of WR BR Maroon stock.

This does mean, however, that no "Westerns" can be used as the first locomotive was outshopped from Swindon Works on 20th December 1961, albeit less than a year after the order was placed. But, D1000 did not arrive at Plymouth Laira until early 1962.

From the SW, I am assuming that Marton Hinmarche can easily be reached via Reading and Oxford, too, there being a connecting line from Oxford?

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5583 on: January 04, 2019, 10:54:38 AM »
From the SW, I am assuming that Marton Hinmarche can easily be reached via Reading and Oxford, too, there being a connecting line from Oxford?
The route will be via Bristol Temple Meads, crossing from the Midland to the GWR at Standish Junction and thence via a link between the GWR route to Stratford-upon-Avon and the Aylesbury and Worcester where the two intersect.  This would take trains directly into Marton Hinmarche, without the need for the shuffle at Banbury.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5584 on: January 05, 2019, 10:03:02 AM »
The plan for next Christmas is for Baron Tiverton to dispatch Tiverton Castle from Marton Hinmarche with a train of chocolate and cream corridor stock and a welcoming party aboard. The train would probably leave on December 21st and travel via the link from the Aylesbury and Worcester to the GWR route which runs from Stratford-upon-Avon to Cheltenham, joining the line from Swindon to Cheltenham and crossing onto the Midland line from Birmingham to Bristol at Standish Junction. 

There could be a difficulty in that Tiverton Castle may not be available for photographs in Cornwall and the West Country.  In that case, the train will terminate at Temple Meads and, once the locomotive has been turned, it will await the parties from the South West.  One possibility is that they could all be conveyed by various trains to Temple Meads and spend the night in Bristol, where they might attend a concert at the Colston Hall, a pantomime performance at the Bristol Hippodrome or a play at the Theatre Royal (Bristol Old Vic) in King Street, one of the most intimate theatres outside the West End.  Different party members might have their own individual preferences for the evening.  There are, of course, several hotels convenient for both Temple Meads and the area around the Tramway Centre, close to the theatres.
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5585 on: January 05, 2019, 11:14:54 AM »
Thank you, Laurence. No, neither Martin nor I have "Tiverton Castle". I do have some old Graham Farish "Castles" but they are awaiting DCC fitting, detailing and renumbering and renaming. However, it was usual, even into BR diesel days, to change locos. at Bristol Temple Meads station, so that is not a problem. As both Martin and I have Bulleid Light Pacifics 34064 "Fighter Command" (72A) and 34065 "Hurricane" (72A), one of these can haul the train to Bristol, via the SR and WR mainlines, not unheard of. Being busy people, I think they will prefer a through journey. That will also keep the story simpler for December 1961.

For the present storyline, though, I need to know the routing from London Paddington. The participants have, or will shortly, be arriving at Reading and I imagined them travelling then via Oxford rather than via Bristol.

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5586 on: January 05, 2019, 11:23:12 AM »
As we are now entering January, 1963, even though I have yet to complete the previous storylines, it is high time that I related the events of that memorable winter, even though one of the stars is still with Gideon. This also serves as a brief 'refresher' for those new to the complicated back stories1

It was Saturday, 22nd December 1962. Sylvia, the only daughter of the Lord and Lady of Trevelver Castle, Cant Cove, was with her best friends from London, the ‘Chelsea Girls’, all bright young women ‘about town’, with not particularly well-paid but fun jobs in advertising (Sylvia was the personal assistant to the Creative Director of S H Benson Ltd., a leading London advertising agency – through her mother, Lady Penelope’s contacts), the arts, commercial photography, fashion, media, pop music, or public relations (especially popular).

They went to the best parties and knew all the famous faces such as the East End photographers Brian Duffy, Terry Donovan, and especially David Bailey, who were the catalysts that set off the whole thing, Brian Epstein, Marianne Faithful, the spirited Mary Quant and her husband and business partner, Alexander Plunket Greene, Chrissie and her more famous sister, Bailey's very young discovery, Jean Shrimpton, “The Shrimp”, the darling of the ‘with-it’ crowd whilst ‘snapper’ Bailey was its envied ladies' man, the Rolling Stones, Vidal Sassoon, and Terence Stamp all of whom helped make the capital city, ‘Swinging London’, while out of the north stormed the phenomenon that was the Beatles. There were other fabulous groups and musicians, too, the Who, Van Morrison and those brilliant jokers, the Kinks. All of whom were well-known to the "Chelsea Girls" and their good friend, the seemingly sixteen-year-old Susan, who was always part of their group but always mysteriously disappearing and reappearing from 1963 to 1964.

The "Chelsea Girls" do, indeed, include debutantes (like Sylvia) who are members of the Chelsea Set of society girls who are often photographed in socially desirable company. However, they all work for their living in fashion, advertising, PR, and the media. The "Girls" are a very close group of friends who know all the leading lights of "Swinging London" and go to all the best parties. However, they are always careful to maintain their reputations, refusing hard drugs of any kind and any suggestions of personal impropriety! (There is much more information about them in various backstories.)

A very important honorary member is Susan, Doctor Who's late teenage (or so she appears to be) granddaughter, who is a particularly close friend of Sylvia who is like an elder sister to her in the 1960s world. Both of them are regular guests at the Trevelvers' Chelsea Townhouse parties as well as being welcome house guests at Trevelver Castle (when they are visiting this particular timestream and where the Doctor, in his Victorian-era clothes, is regarded as a fascinating but somewhat grumpy eccentric).

However, only Sylvia is a regular traveller in the TARDIS and, usually, for practical reasons such as to obtain books and knowledge from the near future to improve the marketing of her beloved Cornwall. The "Chelsea Girls" provide Susan with a close circle of young female friends who share with her the enjoyment of the innovative music and fashion of the 1960s, a world to which she is always happy to return to (except when the Daleks appear). Susan eagerly enjoyed the cultural fads of British teenagers of the time, loving pop groups, now forgotten, such as John Smith and the Common Men. She was also interested in beat poetry. Susan told Sylvia that her months on Earth were "the happiest of her life".

Before taking up residence at 76 Totter's Lane, Susan and the Doctor had begun to study Earth and humans more closely. Before arriving in 1962, the Doctor and Susan had spent time in ancient Rome, Antioch, and Jerusalem. In the sixteenth century, they had spent time in Prague and met the legendary Golem. More recently, they had travelled to Berlin in 1932 and, before that, sometime in the 1920s (Susan was unclear of the date), had also met the English playwright, singer and songwriter, Noël Coward, in London. His plays and songs achieved new popularity in the 1960s and 1970s. All the "Chelsea Girls" being big fans.

In 1962-1963, Susan attended classes at Coal Hill School. However, there was an obvious imbalance in her knowledge compared with her classmates. She understood advanced physics and chemistry beyond the abilities of her teachers, yet did not know how many shillings made a pound; she thought the United Kingdom was on the decimal system, which only the United States had in 1963 and hadn't yet been introduced to the UK. Sylvia advised her to gradually tell her teachers, Ian and Barbara, of her knowledge to ensure she didn't embarrass them in class.

Susan understood contemporary and future technology very well and was familiar with historical events, but knew very little about ordinary things, like money, which was why she was so grateful to become an honorary "Chelsea Girl" as they helped her deal with such practical matters as well as introducing her to famed stylist Vidal Sassoon who created her hairstyle to help her fit in with the London Scene.

Both Susan and her grandfather became particularly drawn to North Cornwall. Lady Penelope introduced them to the elegant T9 'Greyhound' 4-4-0s which even then were regarded very much as historical curiosities with enthusiasts knowing that they were fortunate to be able to see and ride behind them in the "Swinging Sixties". Something about these locos.' elegant lines and simple yet effective technology appealed to the Time Lords. Susan also shared her friends' enthusiasm for the BR Standard 5MT 4-6-0 affectionately known to them as the 'Green Dragon'. Maybe, like the TARDIS it seemed to Susan much more than a mere machine but a living, elemental creation? The Doctor also, once implied that his similarly rather egotistical engineer friend, Oliver Bulleid, had benefitted from advanced elemental technology when designing the superbly performing boilers of his Pacifics. Exmouth Junction enginemen certainly rated these locos. very highly.

Christmas came and went with everyone who had played a part in defeating the Daleks, including the Doctor, once more gathered together in Trevelver Castle, in grateful celebration, enjoying the finest of seasonal food accompanied by the best that Chelsea wine merchant, Giles Roskrow, could supply to augment the contents of the Castle’s excellent and very extensive cellars. Colonel Lethbridge-Stewart and his Scots Guards, although still guarding the mysterious "Golden Hoard" or "Horde" in the cellar under the Owl Tower, were not forgotten and when, off-duty, were able to join the other guests. Sir Mortimer Wheeler, to everyone’s considerable relief, remained in London attending a seemingly endless series of top-secret meetings discussing the fate of the orichalcum and was not to return, that year. Before his departure, to London, with Sir Mortimer, Admiral Tregowan had been fully briefed by the Doctor who refused to participate, in person, in the endless discussions stating: “You have my advice. It would be most foolish not to follow it! I have nothing further to say on the matter, either to you or Wheeler! Captain Jeremy and his team understand what needs to be done. They await your orders, in Plymouth, but time is now of the essence.”

An easterly wind set in just before Christmas, to be replaced by a northerly as another high-pressure area formed near Iceland, blocking the westerly flow that usually brings mild and wet air from the Atlantic. Boxing Day 1962, brought blizzards to the southwest of England and December 28th saw further falls of snow. Then, with the last Christmas guests all safely arrived home and deliveries of food and drink completed to restore depleted local stocks, on 29th December, 1962, an Atlantic depression brought a blizzard that left drifts of 20 feet or more piled up in the southwest, stranding villagers and bringing down power lines. As the New Year arrived, some of the worst blizzards in living memory swept the southwest of England. An anticyclone over Scandinavia drew cold, continental air from central Russia as far as Britain. The extremely severe weather with snow, ice and freezing fog caused late-running trains, locomotive and diesel unit failures, and cancellations. During the last days of the year there began a period of continuous and severe frost with frequent snowstorms. It proved to be one of the coldest winters on record in the United Kingdom but very few, outside Trevelver Castle, knew the real reason for the winter’s unusual severity. The worst winter weather Britain had seen for 200 years saw temperatures plummeting and lakes and rivers began to freeze over. Only the Tamar bridge linked Devon with Cornwall. All other roads between the counties were closed due to snow. Rail conditions in the West were so bad that priority was given to trains carrying food, coal, oil and petrol. By January 1963, the West Country was blanketed with snowdrifts up to 18ft deep in places. But, far from the freeze abating, it would prove to be the coldest month of the twentieth century. By January 6, 1963 – a Sunday – the snow was back with a vengeance. It was reported a total of 1,300 sheep, ponies and cattle were dug out of drifts on Dartmoor.

Diesel motive power had a particularly difficult time and, as a result, many steam locomotives withdrawn during the last months of 1962 were brought back into service for a time, some for only a few days and others for longer periods. Very fortunately, thanks to the forewarned CLPG, GWS, and their supporters, North and West Cornwall still had more than sufficient steam locos. in full working order to maintain a full timetable once the lines had been repeatedly cleared by hardworking railwaymen working in atrocious conditions. Lady Trevelver had tipped off the Exmouth Junction shedmaster, who had had to, officially, withdraw, in the November, the last three 700 Class ‘Black Motors’ (30689, 30697, and 30700), kept for snowplough duties, to make alternative provision in time. Thus, 30689 and 30700 (both caring BR Black Late Crest livery), together with 30697, and restored to full working order, became the last three at Exeter and were allocated for standby snowplough duty that terrible Winter of 1962-3.  Alas, No. 30697 had to be condemned following serious damage caused whilst trying to clear snow, on 13th January. That left the last two which did not, finally, leave for the breakers until between December 1963 to January 1964, being the last of their class to move under their own power. Fortunately, acting on behalf of the CLPG, Lady Trevelver had the pair stopped and, instead, diverted to Eastleigh Works which was then paid to select the best loco. and parts and overhaul the resulting loco. and return it for preservation by the CLPG at Cant Cove, whilst the other resumed its final journey to the scrapyard.

Forewarned by Susan, thanks to the TARDIS, the “Chelsea Girls” and their friends, who had arrived on the very last train to get through, overnight, organised supplies of hot cocoa in thermos flasks, involving Angela as much as possible but, as Eli sadly observed, “the fire in ‘er ‘as gone out”. Unable to return to London, their employers granted them temporary leave to remain in North Cornwall. It was to prove a much longer break than anyone (other than Susan and her friends) had anticipated. The cold was interspersed with brief thaws that caused pipes to burst and then refreeze. Reservoirs froze feet thick and drinking water had to be distributed in the worst-hit areas. People collected coal from frozen depots because normal distribution was difficult. While major highways were kept clear, most country roads were impassable for weeks.

After a brief thaw at the end of January, which allowed some coal and other vital supplies to get through to areas previously isolated, the snow returned. On February 4, it was reported that Cornwall was cut off by blizzards. Fifty people spent the night in a train on the edge of Dartmoor. By February 17, in the southwest, hopes rose on a day of brilliant sunshine. For the first time since Christmas all main roads were open across Dartmoor. On March 2, troops relieved a farm on Dartmoor which had been cut off by 20ft snow drifts for 66 days.

Finally, the thaw set in during early March; 6th March 1963 being the first morning of the since Boxing Day without any frost anywhere in Britain. The Big Freeze, which had lasted throughout much of Great Britain for over two months, was over. The temperatures soon soared to 17 °C (62.6 °F) and the remaining snow rapidly disappeared. The winter of 1962-3 broke many records for the coldest and longest-lasting of the twentieth century. But for adults, it was not unprecedented. They had lived through the winter of 1947 which, while not as severe, was even snowier. Perhaps that explained the greater stoicism on show, a determination to get on with things rather than stay indoors.

With conditions, finally, returning to normal, the “Chelsea Girls” decided to take Angela with them for a holiday, abroad, to visit the friends they had made. Susan and Enka Lou-Lou, readily agreed. What they all had lived through now bound them, for life. Marielle Kerbriant, the SW England CIWL representative, once again, volunteered to make all the bookings and accompany them as their tour manager and guide. Giles Roskrow agreed to join the party as did Captain Jeremy Corentyn Cador who, to his still considerable surprise, once more found his leave application unusually quickly authorised and that for an extended period, too. Sofia de la Vega, returned to Trevelver Castle to travel with them throughout their extensive Continental tour and, with Marielle, organised their welcome in Sant Cristofol (capital of the Principat de Guin).

Susan’s grandfather, giving Susan his blessing to travel with her friends, informed her that, with Angela no longer requiring the TARDIS sickbay, he would be visiting his rather egotistical (at this the teenager smiled to herself) engineer friends, Oliver Bulleid, and Dugald Drummond, and would also be spending time riding on some of their locomotives, particularly the Bulleid Pacifics and Drummond T9 Greyhounds, but as rebuilt by Robert Urie, he winked.

With Sir Mortimer Wheeler, after the shortest of stays, having returned to London, in a sealed train, accompanying the "Golden Hoard" or "Horde", guarded by the patient Colonel Lethbridge-Stewart and his Scots Guards, to its new, top secret location, following prolonged deliberation at the very highest levels in Whitehall, as soon as the rails were clear, Lord and Lady Trevelver could close Trevelver Castle for a month, giving everyone a very well-deserved paid holiday, and depart for a villa booked on Myknonos.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 11:39:49 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Corrected. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5587 on: January 05, 2019, 12:57:27 PM »
A very special train was run on Sunday, December 23rd, for Sylvia's beloved old Cornish widowed nanny, 'Nursie', from Fowey, who married the former regular driver of the 14xx, 1419, on the autotrain to / from Lostwithiel (on which 'Nursie' often took Sylvia when she was very small) who looks after the train crew as well as the "Girls" on some of their trips but, unfortunately, is rather deaf and can fall asleep in the loudest bar.

The train, slowly, ran to and from Cant Cove, as 'Nursie' was staying at Trevelver Castle, to Bodmin Road and back. Being a Sunday, even in the week before Christmas, the line was very quiet.

'Nursie' was brought to the train by Trevelver Castle's housekeeper whose car can be seen on the station platform.







[The autocoach, with 14xx, 1419, awaits renumbering to W163W,]
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 11:40:21 AM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5588 on: January 05, 2019, 02:01:11 PM »
Forewarned of the great snow to come, BR WR has moved a snowplough to Wadebridge whilst BR SR have arranged for one of the last three 700 Class ‘Black Motors’, 30700, to be transferred for snowplough duties, which is eagerly awaited. For snowplough duties, locos. without leading bogies, which easily become derailed by compacted snow, are preferred. Fortunately, the GWS (Bodmin) have available plenty of 0-6-0s and 9655 (83E) has been tried and tested with it.


Offline port perran

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5589 on: January 05, 2019, 02:54:32 PM »
Lets hope that snowplough can keep the tracks clear.
Further West we will have to rely on a gang of men armed with Cornish shovels I’m afraid.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5590 on: January 05, 2019, 02:55:11 PM »
At the very hastily arranged January 2nd, 1963 meeting with Sally Carter, at the "Station Hotel", Trepol Bay, agreement was reached for the first trial batches of eggs to be delivered the following day.
Assuming that the quality continues to be high, twice weekly deliveries will commence the following Monday.
Having just delivered the first load of eggs at Trepol Bay, the train, headed by the M7 is seen heading for Wadebridge and Cant Cove.
CDD73DBC-DACF-4E6D-B756-0402175EB992 by martin scane, on Flickr

Because of the severe snowfall, which began on Boxing Day 1962, bringing blizzards to the southwest of England and December 28th, which saw further falls of snow and, on 29th December 1962, the Atlantic depression which brought a blizzard that left drifts of 20 feet or more piled up in the southwest, our intrepid photographer actually had to wait until the snow had, finally, gone before taking these photos.

No. 9655 and its snowplough managed to keep the line clear and the local council kept the roads and pavements clear so that the very hastily arranged January 2nd meeting at the "Station Hotel" in Trepol Bay could take place. Agreement was reached for the first trial batches of eggs be delivered, snow allowing. After sampling a range of expertly prepared dishes, at the hotel, using the Devon eggs, it was agreed that the quality was more than acceptable, and that twice-weekly delivery would commence the following Monday, assuming the lines could be kept clear. After checking with the station staff, Sally Carter decided to book a room for the night rather than risk being stranded in a snowed-in train.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 09:38:25 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5591 on: January 05, 2019, 03:29:23 PM »
Lets hope that snowplough can keep the tracks clear.
Further West we will have to rely on a gang of men armed with Cornish shovels I’m afraid.

Fortunately, there are plenty of local volunteer snow shovellers on call. For more stubborn snowdrifts, there are two local 94xx pannier tanks, plus two '2251' 0-6-0s (coded Yellow Dot, so able to operate almost anywhere in North and West Cornwall) on call at Penmayne and Port Perran. Unfortunately, the 94xx which usually works the Castle Branch, 8485 (83E), is still at Swindon Works, so another has been borrowed and moved to Penmayne where it is stabled after special dispensation by the District Civil Engineer was given for it to run between Cant Cove and Penmayne due to its Red dot coding, like "Halls" and "Warships". Fortunately, Wadebridge to both Bodmin Road and Port Perran is suitable for Red dot locos., as is Port Perran to Newquay and Chacewater, and thence to Truro, etc.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 03:35:13 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated, »

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5592 on: January 05, 2019, 05:33:31 PM »
For the present storyline, though, I need to know the routing from London Paddington. The participants have, or will shortly, be arriving at Reading and I imagined them travelling then via Oxford rather than via Bristol.
The trains from Paddington leave London on the old GWR route to Birmingham as far as Princes Risborough and then proceed to Aylesbury.  In reality the line between Princes Risborough and Aylesbury is a branchline but, in the alternative world of Marton Hinmarche, it carries mainline trains from London onto the Aylesbury and Worcester.  From Oxford, it is necessary to turn the train round at Banbury to link onto the A&W.  This is normally achieved by a loco change, the new loco coupling onto the back of the train at Banbury.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 05:36:05 PM by Innovationgame, Reason: Additional information. »
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5593 on: January 05, 2019, 05:49:56 PM »
I remember the Winter of 1963 very well.  I was foolish enough to travel from my home in Coventry to Catterick in North Yorkshire.  In some local villages, whole houses were buried!
With kind regards
Laurence
My personal website is a bit of a mish mash: www.innovationgame.com
Coventry Corporation Transport Society: www.cct-society.org.uk
Hessle: www.hessle.org.uk

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Re: Cant Cove (and Penmayne)
« Reply #5594 on: January 05, 2019, 05:58:56 PM »
Thanks, Laurence. The Reading station pilot, 7816 "Frilsham Manor" (81D, 9/62-8/64; then preserved by the GWS, Bodmin), will take the BCK from the Paddington bound train and place it at the rear of a local DMU service to Oxford. At Oxford, the station pilot, a BR 350 bhp diesel shunter, will place it at the rear of a cross-country train calling at Banbury. At Banbury, it will be transferred, by the new train loco., to the front of its train, the next train bound for Marton Hinmarche.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2019, 06:10:31 PM by Chris in Prague, Reason: Updated. »

 

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