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Author Topic: exiting from a headshunt  (Read 196 times)

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Offline bluedepot

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exiting from a headshunt
« on: June 28, 2020, 04:52:55 PM »
hi

do you need to signal an exit from a headshunt if it is only possible to move back onto a siding (or sidings) and not onto a running line?

does this depend on whether the relevant points are controlled from the signal box or are manual?

cheers


tim

Online crewearpley40

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Re: exiting from a headshunt
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2020, 05:00:44 PM »

Online Train Waiting

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Re: exiting from a headshunt
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2020, 08:32:59 PM »
hi

do you need to signal an exit from a headshunt if it is only possible to move back onto a siding (or sidings) and not onto a running line?

does this depend on whether the relevant points are controlled from the signal box or are manual?

cheers
tim

Not normally, Tim.  Although practice has changed over time.

Otherwise the signalman would have to signal potentially lots of shunt movements which are normally directed by the shunter on the ground.

What you might have is a subsidiary signal allowing access from the sidings to the running line.  If the connection to the running line looks like a crossover, with the headshunt straight on, you might well see a yellow ground signal.  This isn't a distant or repeater; it can be passed at 'on' for a movement into the headshunt.  It is pulled 'off' to allow a movement on to the running line.  The purpose of the yellow ground signal is to prevent the signalman having to signal movements into the headshunt - this would be the case if it was a 'stop' ground signal.

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

Offline bluedepot

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Re: exiting from a headshunt
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2020, 05:35:29 PM »
many thanks crewe and john!

for any exit onto a running line i will have a ground disc signal. i have some pd marsh ones to place.

yes i thought about that, i might paint one of the discs i have yellow to represent this kind of signal which you can pass when on to move into a headshunt.

cheers


tim

 

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