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Author Topic: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!  (Read 6180 times)

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Online Bealman

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #180 on: May 07, 2019, 08:45:16 AM »
Kyoto had a train in steam everyday according to the English signage, but if that continues during winter, I don't know.

I do know that the steam locomotives are lovingly cared for, just like in the UK.

I didn't know they'd dropped the N from the NRM. Like yourself, why?

More on the steam display soon!
« Last Edit: May 07, 2019, 10:31:20 AM by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #181 on: May 08, 2019, 05:33:09 AM »
.....From the Skydeck, a longish flight of steps led down to the turntable/roundhouse/steam train ride area. This was a very impressive facility, with many preserved locomotives, none of which were identifiable to Bealman (although the orange one looked like the one I saw inside, though probably is a totally different class):



I got a close up look at the loco in steam, while yet another local train clattered overhead:





This beastie was sitting on a yard track, I'm still not sure if that belonged to the museum or not. Do Japan still use diesel shunters? Suppose they do, but when I come to think about it, I don't think I saw a single freight train in three weeks!



The roundhouse area is quite accessible, and visitors are allowed to wander around as they please:





As stated earlier, the steam collection is quite extensive, and lovingly preserved:







Maintenance was in progress while Bealman was there:





Mind you, I think this machine is in need of a plumber rather than a railwayman!! Very much like an American locomotive, with all the plumbing on the outside.



Talking of American locos, this one apparently hails from Pittsburgh! Mind you it was beautifully polished and the huge cowcatcher certainly impressed Bealman.



The guy with the bag in this picture took a liking to me and was obviously a train enthusiast, pointing to stuff and babbling excitedly as he did so. I didn't understand a word of course, but bowed politely at every second sentence or so. Bowing had become quite natural to me by now, and I often found myself doing it in shops and hotel receptions.



Anyway, by now the time was getting on, and Bealman was getting thirsty. So a quick dart back through the museum, and a look in the shop. Plenty of Kato:



And Tomix:



I refrained from splurging, although as I had bought a souvenir N gauge wagon in Minatur Wunderland in Hamburg, I felt obliged to pick up a similar souvenir of Kyoto.

I briefly paused at this curiosity on the way out - I assume it represents a railway kiosk from the seventies, but it caught my eye because of the red phone. When I arrived in Australia in 1974, they were everywhere!!!



Now for the long walk back and to find a pub on the way.....

« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 05:46:29 AM by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #182 on: May 08, 2019, 07:14:19 AM »
.....From the Skydeck, a longish flight of steps led down to the turntable/roundhouse/steam train ride area. This was a very impressive facility, with many preserved locomotives, none of which were identifiable to Bealman (although the orange one looked like the one I saw inside, though probably is a totally different class):



That is a DE10, the Co-Bo of the sideways cockpits mentioned earlier.

The others are... some kind of kettles. You can tell because they're black.

I got a close up look at the loco in steam, while yet another local train clattered overhead:





A C62, the biggest kettle to run in Japan.

This beastie was sitting on a yard track, I'm still not sure if that belonged to the museum or not. Do Japan still use diesel shunters? Suppose they do, but when I come to think about it, I don't think I saw a single freight train in three weeks!



Another DE10; they are still in use, as shunters and for short trip workings, though gradually being phased out and replaced by diesel/electic hybrids (thought the basic shape is similar).

Plenty of freight trains if you look in the right place, right now I'm sitting in a branch of Wendy's conveniently overlooking the platform of Tokyo's outer loop/freight avoidance line and have seen half-a-dozen go past in the last hour or o.

Talking of American locos, this one apparently hails from Pittsburgh! Mind you it was beautifully polished and the huge cowcatcher certainly impressed Bealman.



I'd guess that's from Hokkaido, whose railways were very US-inspired.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 07:41:04 AM by railsquid »
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Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

Online Bealman

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #183 on: May 08, 2019, 07:25:35 AM »
Once again, a mine of info, Ian.  :thumbsup:

Take a bow, mate.  :beers:

Actually it's probably just as well I didn't know that about the orange diesel. I'd have been tempted to climb up to take a look, and probably got meself into trouble
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #184 on: May 08, 2019, 08:53:25 AM »
Absolutely super pictures.  The steam locomotives are fascinating.  Imagine running a museum shuttle with a 4-6-4!  The narrow gauge is apparent in these photographs - is it 3'6"?

Thanks again, George (and Ian).

Best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1920s to the 1950s.

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #185 on: May 08, 2019, 09:05:29 AM »
To be perfectly honest John, I never noticed a gauge change at the time! I was sort of wandering around in train gaga land  :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #186 on: May 08, 2019, 09:13:48 AM »
Absolutely super pictures.  The steam locomotives are fascinating.  Imagine running a museum shuttle with a 4-6-4!  The narrow gauge is apparent in these photographs - is it 3'6"?

Correct, 1067mm Cape Gauge.
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #187 on: May 08, 2019, 10:02:44 AM »
 :greatpicturessign:

Bowing had become quite natural to me by now

That'll be quite handy if you get to TINGS, George :D

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #188 on: May 08, 2019, 10:09:08 AM »
Just remind me not to say ah so
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #189 on: May 08, 2019, 06:15:16 PM »
Great pictures, and there's a place I'll need to add to the list of places to visit :)
(Lucky Mrs and Little Grumbeast like museums, they even enjoyed the tank museum in Bovington!)

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #190 on: May 11, 2019, 12:39:51 AM »
There was also this, which looks to Bealman like some commuter or branch railcar set:




Now that is a very early 80 series long(ish) distance EMU, the first such to be introduced in Japan (ca. 1950) and which proved the viability of the EMU as a replacement for services beyond local traffic. These were running long-formation named express trains at their peak.

The later, standard "face" was this:


kato-80-series-kuha86_01 by Rail Squid, on Flickr

and after their withdrawal from top-flight services and allocation to shorter secondary/regional services, a shortage of end cars for the shorter formations led to the addition of commuter EMU-style cabs to intermediate cars like this:


Kato 80 series KuHa85 by Rail Squid, on Flickr
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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #191 on: May 11, 2019, 12:48:20 AM »
Thanks!

Used for long haul in their time, eh? Dunno if I'd like to take a long journey in one! They don't look to be the exact epitome of comfort!

I like your models. Do the lights work?
« Last Edit: May 11, 2019, 12:50:07 AM by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #192 on: May 11, 2019, 01:02:32 AM »
Used for long haul in their time, eh? Dunno if I'd like to take a long journey in one! They don't look to be the exact epitome of comfort!

A vast improvement over trailing behind a plume of grit and ashes, methinks, especially considering the vast amounts of tunnels prevalent on the Japanese railway network.

I like your models. Do the lights work?

Indeed, yes, if you look at the photos you can see them lit up :)
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #193 on: May 11, 2019, 01:11:41 AM »
Used for long haul in their time, eh? Dunno if I'd like to take a long journey in one! They don't look to be the exact epitome of comfort!

A vast improvement over trailing behind a plume of grit and ashes, methinks, especially considering the vast amounts of tunnels prevalent on the Japanese railway network .


And also the relatively low-quality coal available from Japan's mines.

See e.g. this video from 5:00: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqwAw7tf7kU

(video is about the post-war electrification of a line in northern Japan)
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

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Re: Bealman's Excellent Japanese Adventure!
« Reply #194 on: May 11, 2019, 01:34:19 AM »
And apologies if I keep banging on about this, in today's terms that train may not have been exactly luxurious, but bear in mind this was 1950, when just 5 years earlier the height of luxury was being able to travel *inside* the train ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpyDVbfdf_I
Takahachikawa - Japanese and other trains

Birmingham Knotmore Street - (ex) GWR mainline through the Midlands

 

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