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Author Topic: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?  (Read 321 times)

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Offline martyn

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Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« on: March 14, 2019, 01:46:07 PM »
Hi;

Possibly a silly question, but does anyone know what differentiated an express passenger from a stopping passenger train, ie what defined class 1 (or A) and class 2 (B)? Was there a railway definition of the two?

Some are obvious; the fast expresses between major towns are obviously class 1, and a local branch class 2; but what about the longer distance 4/6/8 car or so trains on semi fast, intermediate, or stopping services? When did a longish long distance train that stopped at some stations change class, by definition? Wetre they just allocated a class by Railway Control Office in a possibly random manner?

In all my books and articles, i can't obviously find a definition of one over the other.

TIA

martyn


Offline MJKERR

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2019, 04:14:16 PM »
This really depends on the era of interest

In the (1970s) 1980s to 1990s
Class 1 - Express passenger
Class 2 - Ordinary passenger

This was helpful for a signaller if they knew a Class 1 was late and a Class 2 was on time
The signaller could then swap them if they would then conflict in the next section

I am not aware of a train changing headcode, just because it's stopping pattern did
An example is 1S45 / 1V60 Aberdeen - Plymouth
Effectively this operated the local service between Edinburgh and Aberdeen, along with a change of locomotive and reversal of direction
So it should have had a 2xxx headcode, but this did not take place

Headcodes were usually applied sequentially as they arrived at the destination
So 1M01 would be the first Scotland - Euston arrival

Offline keithfre

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2019, 04:17:22 PM »
Class 1 - Express passenger
Class 2 - Ordinary passenger
That doesn't explain how to differentiate between them, though...

Offline martyn

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2019, 04:34:53 PM »
Hi MJKERR;

My time period is circa 1960, and I'm fully aware of the headcodes and the two classes.

But as keithfre says, it doesn't differentiate between them, or, more to the point, what constitutes 'Express' and 'Ordinary'. I've never come across an article explaining how it was decided what class, and hence which headcode, a particular passenger train carried; but I thought I have read that the class could be changed en route when, eg, a fast train from a distant origin later became an 'all stations' as it reached towards its termination point. As I wouldn't be doing this latter on a model, its a bit theoretical for me! Freight classes were easier to work out, as generally, it was classified according to a number or percentage of vehicles carrying a power brake connected to the loco.

But, especailly for lengthy, long(ish) distance passenger trains, what was the dividing definition between designation as 'Express' or 'Ordinary'?

Thanks again.

martyn




Offline MJKERR

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2019, 07:41:42 PM »
Class 1 - Express passenger
Class 2 - Ordinary passenger
That doesn't explain how to differentiate between them, though...
Class 1 - Usually Main terminus stations only (but not always)
Class 2 - Usually all or the majority of stations (but not always)

There are other factors as well, such as number of coaches, locomotive type, train weight and so on

Offline MJKERR

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2019, 07:50:34 PM »
My time period is circa 1960, and I'm fully aware of the headcodes and the two classes.
I can only cover the 1980s to the late 1990s

Let's take a Type 2, regional train
Now this could be anything from a 75mph DMU through to a 100mph Class 47/7
You could argue the Class 47/7 at 100mph is a Class 1, but it is treated exactly the same as the others (Class 2 in Scotland is anything internal, or Carlisle, or Newcastle)
Now one place where they meet at the same time is Edinburgh Waverley
So if a Class 1 train is behind, but late, it has priority, even if using the same platform
The Class 2 has to wait, if there is a route conflict, whilst the Class 1 is routed to a revised platform
The signaller then has to work out how to resolve that, usually finding another platform for the Class 1

Another example from a cab simulation is a Class 1 from Kings Cross to York, Class 47 (1980s)
This starts off on the Fast Line, but due to a faster HST it is routed to the Slow Line later
However, if it loses time it is routed to the Slow Line earlier and as a result ends up catching up with at least two freight trains
Equally, the program is aware of this so sometimes briefly swaps this train back to the Fast Line (as the HST passed) in order to pass the slower train, even though it has braked and stopped!
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 07:51:37 PM by MJKERR »

Offline MJKERR

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2019, 07:55:58 PM »
One other example :

Class 1
Glasgow 09:00
Carlisle 10:10

Class 1
Glasgow 10:00
Carlisle 11:30

Class 1
Glasgow 10:10
Carlisle 11:20

As you can see from the above, the 10:00 departure is passed by the 10:10 departure
Even though the 10:00 calls at more stations, it is still a Class 1
However, both have not stopped at about five stations they both pass through, served by Class 2

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2019, 09:21:37 PM »
My transition era layout will feature the odd 'footie special' purely so I can justify the odd 'exotic' loco without using Rule 1, but is a 'footie special' an ordinary or an express train especially as it may be long distance?

Offline martyn

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2019, 09:39:08 PM »
MJK;

Thanks for the examples and explanation, it has helped a bit, but.....I think there is some logic with terminus to terminus, but I don't think this is the ultimate answer; a number of class one, at least in East Anglia in the 60s, went, eg Ipswich to Cambridge or Peterborough, with no terminus station at either end. I don't think I've ever seen what determines class 1 or 2;  but it is interesting, at least in modern usage, that all internal Scottish services are 2. Another East Anglia working was the 1245 Harwich Parkeston quay (Harwich International) to Peterborough; this was nominally a 31 or 37 with four passenger coaches with at least two, and sometimes more, bogie vans (usually GUVs). It stopped at all principal stations, with considerable parcels station working;  Ipswich, Bury St Edmunds, Ely, March, and Peterborough, with, at certain timetables, stops on the Harwich branch intermediate stations on the return working (I think); but it was class 1!

Your examples of priority in traffic in case of delays may also be a lead.

NPN;

Almost certainly 1, as there would be few intermediate stops, and then only at the start. Advertised excursions (ADEX) were also class 1. I'm trying to find photos to prove it......

martyn

Later; found a number of photos of steam excursions with class 1 headcode. NPN-also a diesel hauled Royal train with headcode 1X02
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 09:56:18 PM by martyn, Reason: extra info »

Offline MJKERR

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2019, 05:18:40 AM »
is a 'footie special' an ordinary or an express train especially as it may be long distance?
Usually published in the Special Traffic Notice (STN) as FootEx, and then publicly
The same style of headcode would apply, so 1xxx for express and 2xxx for regional
The letter used would then be determined by the route

Offline MJKERR

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2019, 05:22:12 AM »
I think there is some logic with terminus to terminus, but I don't think this is the ultimate answer
In the majority of cases it is Terminus to Terminus, after all that is how most services operate
It is rare for a passenger train not to operate to or from a Terminus
Ipswich, Cambridge and Peterborough are all Terminus stations, where the timetables show arrival times, not just the departure time

Offline martyn

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Re: Passenger trains-express headcode or stopping headcode?
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2019, 07:15:16 AM »
MJKERR;

Many thanks again. I think I was muddling up 'terminus' with 'terminal', ie a station which is a dead end and trains had to depart in the opposite direction to the arrival.

Martyn

 

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