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Author Topic: High Speed and fencing  (Read 661 times)

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Offline biela49

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Re: High Speed and fencing
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2019, 05:06:54 PM »
In Spain all the HS lines are fenced. Nevertheless this do not avoid the cabling thieves act from time to time.

Online RailGooner

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Re: High Speed and fencing
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2019, 05:41:24 PM »
I think it stems from the early days of railways when trains were deemed to be fire breathing monsters from which the public needed to be protected...

Exemplified when the world's first passenger train mortally injured William Huskisson MP at Edge Hill Parkside.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2019, 10:18:18 PM by RailGooner »
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Offline swisstrains

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Re: High Speed and fencing
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2019, 09:11:25 PM »
I think it stems from the early days of railways when trains were deemed to be fire breathing monsters from which the public needed to be protected...

Exemplified when the world's first passenger train mortally injured William Huskisson MP at Edge Hill.

The accident actually occurred at Parkside near Newton-le-Willows. There is a memorial at the side of the track.
John

Offline NYMR

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Re: High Speed and fencing
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2019, 05:44:13 PM »
Interesting that a number of Swiss buildings including the Olympic Park in Lausanne are completely open to public access with no apparent security.

Offline Lankyman

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Re: High Speed and fencing
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2019, 08:22:54 PM »
In my time as a railway employee I was always told that the only legal obligation British Rail and its ancestors had was to fence the railway to prevent access by farm animals. Hence the widespread use of wooden post and rail and post and wire types of fencing, usually effective against the likes of sheep and cows. This was not always the case when I once asked the local Station Master if there were any gaps in the fencing and the response was "the sheep round here are Aintree specialists!" It was in BR's own interest to provide fencing at other locations to prevent human trespass.

I can remember attending several inquests where a young child got access to the railway through a gap in chain fencing made by adults to create a shortcut and BR were criticised by the Coroner for not keeping the fence in good order, despite the fact there was no legal obligation to provide the fence in the first place and when BR did repair the fence a new gap was created minutes after the gang had left the site. This is why you now see extensive and substantial types of fencing along much of the railway in urban areas. I suppose it is cheaper to protect yourself in this way than pay the extensive claims for damages in the event of an incident not to mention the bad publicity. What never fails to amaze me is how many cases still occur of idiots who break through substantial fencing and then climb on top of rolling stock. It's fun until they meet the overhead electrified line and the force of 25Kv. Even then, in the eyes of the Press and Public it's always the railways fault.

Ron
Ron

Offline Cooper

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Re: High Speed and fencing
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2019, 10:41:32 PM »
The first railway fencing was mandated by parliament to keep those horrible rough navvies and local populace OUT of the private estates that the railway was built through. They didn’t want them pinching the game and produce!
« Last Edit: January 28, 2019, 02:17:51 PM by Cooper, Reason: Typo »

Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: High Speed and fencing
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2019, 11:21:12 PM »
If it wasn't fenced it was a tramway. And tramways have different rules.

Whilst most tramways were industrial/farm there were historically lots of railway ones include routes across and to docks, weymouth, and of course the Wisbech and Upwell.

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