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Author Topic: Control panel layout  (Read 315 times)

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Offline springwood

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Control panel layout
« on: March 05, 2019, 08:24:06 AM »
Morning all,
Looking for a little bit of guidance here. I have pretty much finalised my plan - see attached - and will be splitting the layout into 4 sections/blocks, under the control of 4 cabs (C1 to C4). My current thinking is to wire the rotaries so that in theory C1 can have control of one or all blocks..with the same scenario for cabs 2, 3 and 4. Obviously two cabs can't have the same block at the same time!
In terms of the set-out on the panel - see attached sketch - not sure which is best practise. To go for option (a) or option (b)?? Any suggestions/comments would be much appreciated.

Finally, I am thinking that perhaps the crossover with the arrow pointing at it is the wrong way round? If a train wishes to pass from the down main to the branch, it would have to go beyond the crossover and then effectively reverse onto the branch. Also trains on the down main are coming into a trailing point as it stands. Maybe not great. Again, what do you think??

Thanks, Robin

Offline LAandNQFan

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Re: Control panel layout
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2019, 09:17:18 AM »
I don't know what period you are modelling, Robin, but facing points tended to be frowned upon in the old days.
Having one crossover between up and down and one between the branch and the main lines means that reversing will be always be necessary in one of the directions whichever way you put the crossover.  At the moment, trains can use both crossovers to travel from the up main, across the down onto the branch quite smoothly.
Having the luxury of four controllers, is the cab control necessary?  Why not dedicate one controller to each block?  I don't know what sort of rotary switches you intend to use, but isn't there a danger that as you rotate each one it will connect with the other sections?  If there is movement between branch and the up line, the down will be out of action anyway, and the track between the two crossovers is the only part which needs to be independently controlled.
Apologies if I have completely misunderstood your intentions!
Whichever way you go, I would put the IRJs on the up loops at the other end of the loops so that a train can drive into the station and stop in the station if the point in front of it is set for the other track. 

Perhaps the proof that there is intelligent life in outer space is that they haven't contacted us.
Layout thread: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=23416

Offline springwood

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Re: Control panel layout
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2019, 09:46:01 AM »
The intention is to model era 7 (TOPS, BR blue, late 70s to early 80s). I am slightly confused with your opening remark concerning the points. I thought a facing point is where two routes diverge in the direction of travel? On my plan, trains running round the down main will pass one trailing (convergent) point (the one that I have pointed to with the arrow). Surely, on main line running, it is better for a train to pass over facing points? That's why I am tempted to change the crossover from DM to branch..
You ask Why not dedicate one controller to each block? In that scenario, what if, for example, C1 wanted to run a train from up main to branch or depot? My mainline station is positioned in bottom left corner (roughly where the red and green arrowheads are).

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Control panel layout
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2019, 10:20:08 AM »
I don't know what period you are modelling, Robin, but facing points tended to be frowned upon in the old days.


Frowned upon but still used (I have loads of DVDs showing facing points in the steam era). However, they were generally subject to speed restrictions such as in a station approach or goods yard entrance.


Whichever way you go, I would put the IRJs on the up loops at the other end of the loops so that a train can drive into the station and stop in the station if the point in front of it is set for the other track. 


Agreed.

I am slightly confused with your opening remark concerning the points. I thought a facing point is where two routes diverge in the direction of travel?


See diagram below:-


Online Milton Rail

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Re: Control panel layout
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2019, 12:23:57 PM »
That helpful diagram is getting lots of use at the moment Mick!  :thumbsup:

Online ntpntpntp

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Re: Control panel layout
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2019, 02:06:02 PM »
Rather than use rotary switches for my cab control, I use interlocking 4 pole double throw switches like these which behave like proper radio buttons (ie. you press one and the other pings up).  It avoids the problem of linking two controllers to one section.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/p/4-Pole-2-Throw-Locking-4-Keys-Pushbutton-Push-Button-Switch-AC-220v-3a/1638391263?iid=163318847422&chn=ps




I use to source mine from Maplin but of course that's not an option any more, but they're still out there to be found.  I use round button caps now (not shown in the above item) for ease of drilling the holes in the panel, but on a previous layout I used rectangular caps.

I only have 3 controllers so one switch position is left empty (not visible from the face of the control panel). I used to fit a dummy switch in the 4th position as an Off switch but nowadays to switch a section off I simply half-press another button until they all ping up.

This panel was built in 1995. Still working perfectly  :D


« Last Edit: March 05, 2019, 02:07:47 PM by ntpntpntp »
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

Offline springwood

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Re: Control panel layout
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2019, 08:12:25 PM »
Message for ntpntpntp - I have sent you a private message (I think and hope!) - have you received it?

Online ntpntpntp

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Re: Control panel layout
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2019, 08:27:33 PM »
Message for ntpntpntp - I have sent you a private message (I think and hope!) - have you received it?
Hi, yes received and replied.

In case anyone else is interested, here's the rough sketch I drew up for Robin regarding how I wire up the interlocking radio button switches to cab control track sections


Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

 

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