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Author Topic: Tram direction question  (Read 2323 times)

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Offline Gordon

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Re: Tram direction question
« Reply #30 on: January 20, 2017, 01:38:29 AM »
best option imo is to run it without the trailer, or, get two motor cars and run them coupled together?!!
tim

One option would be to lay a stub terminus with a short siding, and park the trailer semi permanently in the siding - a pretty realistic scenario around the world. Then just run the tram on its own.

Two other realistic options:

1) buy another tram and run it in motor - trailer - motor formation (this was common practice with the aforementioned East German Reko trams (and in Budapest))

2) lay a short loop with a stub at the end, and make it a slight slope. On some tram lines, gravity was used to achieve the change of direction at termini or short working termini at intermediate loops. sequence was:

lets assume the track runs east to west

Tram arrives from east and stops before the tracks split into two to form the passing loop
trailer detached before the points into the loop (ie at the east end of the loop) and brakes applied.
Tram moves forward westbound on its own into 'road 1' in the loop
trailer is allowed to freewheel westbound down the slope through 'road 2' , thus passing the motor tram temporarily parked there.
trailer runs westbound into the stub (west end of the loop) and is pulled up
tram runs onto the parked trailer in the stub and recouples.
tram and trailer depart back eastbound

This is one of the several  'forgotten' railway operating oddities  in real life - seems implausible but really did happen - in a similar vein there were places around Europe where steam locos had to be detached from their tender to be turned on turntables that were too short .


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« Last Edit: January 20, 2017, 01:40:20 AM by Gordon »
Sometime Publicity Officer, N Gauge Society

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Offline PLD

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Re: Tram direction question
« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2017, 07:52:15 AM »
best option imo is to run it without the trailer, or, get two motor cars and run them coupled together?!!
tim

One option would be to lay a stub terminus with a short siding, and park the trailer semi permanently in the siding - a pretty realistic scenario around the world. Then just run the tram on its own.

Two other realistic options:

1) buy another tram and run it in motor - trailer - motor formation (this was common practice with the aforementioned East German Reko trams (and in Budapest))

2) lay a short loop with a stub at the end, and make it a slight slope. On some tram lines, gravity was used to achieve the change of direction at termini or short working termini at intermediate loops. sequence was:

lets assume the track runs east to west

Tram arrives from east and stops before the tracks split into two to form the passing loop
trailer detached before the points into the loop (ie at the east end of the loop) and brakes applied.
Tram moves forward westbound on its own into 'road 1' in the loop
trailer is allowed to freewheel westbound down the slope through 'road 2' , thus passing the motor tram temporarily parked there.
trailer runs westbound into the stub (west end of the loop) and is pulled up
tram runs onto the parked trailer in the stub and recouples.
tram and trailer depart back eastbound

This is one of the several  'forgotten' railway operating oddities  in real life - seems implausible but really did happen - in a similar vein there were places around Europe where steam locos had to be detached from their tender to be turned on turntables that were too short .


.
Gravity-shunting is still used today on the Manx Electric Railway to reverse Motor-Trailer combinations!

 

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