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Your Layout and Models => Layout Construction => Topic started by: dannyboy on January 07, 2019, 07:56:17 PM

Title: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 07, 2019, 07:56:17 PM
I have mentioned in a few posts my layout 'Averingcliffe', so I thought it was about time I gave some information.

The layout is approximately 12 feet in length by 2' 6", with the last 2 feet at either end extending to 4 feet. Basically there are two loops and each of the 4 feet pieces at the ends will have a length of track that goes....er....nowhere really. Actually, the one at the left goes to a little seaside halt, whilst the one at the right goes to a harbour, but I have that side set up so I can attach cassettes.  Inside the two loops to the front, there will be lines to a station with two, (three?), platforms, a head shunt to the left and a line to a turntable and workshops etc to the right. To the rear, there will be a line from the inner loop which will feed a 'Royal Mail' depot and a dairy. Before you all ask, no there is no track plan, although this was what I originally envisaged.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/8/main_34834.jpg)

Things have changed a lot since then! That is one big advantage of using Kato Unitrack - I have changed the layout quite a bit since the plan was first formed about 2 years ago.  :o. One of the biggest changes is that there are no tunnels in the corners. There is a large mountain at the rear, just over 4 feet in length, which rises between 2 roads, with two single track tunnels. Travelling clockwise, both loops rise and the outer loop stays at that level through the mountain, whilst the inner loop drops to road level when it exits from the mountain. Talking of roads, they have been changed a lot as well!

What I intend doing is showing my layout 'in bits', together with a bit of history of the area, which is set 'somewhere in England', in an indeterminate, (Rule 1), era.  :-\

The first bit is as follows, ( with some poetic licence) -

This is a photograph of the original dairy on my layout ‘Averingcliffe’. The photo’ was taken in 1909, a few years after the dairy was opened by the two brothers Daniel and Edward Wakefield, in 1903. As you can see, the building is in need of some repairs, including the re-covering of the roof. The brothers were just about managing to run the dairy, with milk being brought in by horse and cart from local farmers and by rail from some of the outlying stations – many of which were nothing more than little halts on the line. Cheese and butter were the mainstays of production. However, within five years, things were to change big time.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/72/4209-070119184747.jpeg)

Prior to the outbreak of WW1, Daniel and Edward met two sisters who had come to the UK at the turn of the century as teenagers. The sisters, Maria and Sofia were from Italy and met the two brothers at the home of a mutual friend.  Maria and Sofia had worked on the family farm near Naples, so had some knowledge of the dairy industry, although Maria had more business acumen than Sofia, who was always ‘hands on’ on the farm. Daniel married Maria in 1912, whilst Edward married Sofia a year later.

Because of the First World War, there was a huge increase in the demand for condensed milk which increased the Wakefield Dairies cash input enormously.  In 1915, the British Government started issuing condensed milk to troops as part of their emergency rations. This further helped to increase revenue at Wakefield Dairies, with the Government awarding a lucrative contract. Due to the Government contract, the workforce was increased with some workers being brought in by train to a nearby small station, with the Wakefield’s paying for a tunnel to be constructed, connecting the station to the dairy. The Wakefield’s had to fight off a strong challenge from the American company Nestlé, who tried to buy them out, having acquired numerous companies and who also had a supply agreement with companies in Australia.

Due to the profits made by the Wakefield Dairy, plans were drawn up for a new dairy and production facility to be built a short distance away. Work started on the new buildings in 1919.


I will release part 2 of the 'Wakefield Dairies' story shortly, when the electrician has done some more work, (I am awaiting some fibre optic cable!). Thank you to those who have read to the end.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on January 07, 2019, 08:02:20 PM
I really like the story and the building. The rickety roof is really good.
So......is the layout finished or is it still under construction?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 07, 2019, 08:07:07 PM
I really like the story and the building. The rickety roof is really good.
So......is the layout finished or is it still under construction?

Thank you for those comments.  :thumbsup:
Q: "is the layout finished or is it still under construction?"
A: Why do you think you are getting the story in bits?  :smiley-laughing: :no:. Now that I am retired, hopefully the progress will be, (a bit), quicker than it has been these last two years.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on January 07, 2019, 09:22:07 PM
Very interesting story and a good picture.

Many thanks.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on January 08, 2019, 10:45:08 PM
 :hellosign: Really like the story, love the old dairy building & looking forward to your next update
    regards Derek
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 14, 2019, 03:15:29 PM

Part II
The new dairy buildings were completed in 1923. The two following photographs were taken a couple of weeks before the official opening, which occurred on 30th June. The weather was fine and dry, with temperatures reaching 73° Fahrenheit according to the local newspaper report. Numerous dignitaries from the county attended, along with the workers, who were given a days wage. Many people from the surrounding villages were invited and travelled in charabancs provided by Daniel and Edward. The new buildings were officially opened by the Lord Lieutenant of the county Sir Theodore Saurus, known to his friends as ‘Theo’. Sir Theodore was a man of many words; in fact, it took him nearly half an hour to officially declare the buildings open! Unfortunately, no photographs of the official opening survive due to bomb damage during World War II, (more details to follow in a later episode).

The new buildings were much larger than was required for the current workload and work force, but the Wakefield’s rationale was that this course of action would allow them to expand the business at a later date, without incurring too much expense. This was to prove an astute move, as later events will show. The loading bay on the side of the building facing the old dairy building, was used for loading horse drawn carts with produce and, increasingly, by the relatively new motorised vehicles. Daniel and Edward decided that it would be more prudent to run a second private siding, between the original siding and the loading bay, to facilitate extra movements. This was finally built in 1929 and as no service was provided by any railway company, they were informed by their lawyers that the provisions of the Railway Act 1921 did not apply.

Edward and Sofia had a son, Robert, exactly nine months to the day after their wedding, which did cause a few raised eyebrows, although Robert was a true ‘honeymoon baby’. Daniel and Maria’s first child, also a son, who they called John, was born three months later. This pleased both sets of parents, as it meant the cousins could grow up together. Daniel and Maria had another child, a daughter, Mary in 1917, whilst Edward and Sofia had a daughter, Margaret, in 1920. It was a real family occasion at the official opening, although the children were in the care of their respective Nanny’s while the parents mingled with the visitors.


The two surviving photographs -


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-140119144243.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=73166)



(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-140119144331.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=73168)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on January 14, 2019, 07:11:21 PM
Great photographs - being B&W really creates the period feel.
And I love the back story which helps to build a believable picture.
Keep up the good work.
Thanks
Martin


Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on January 15, 2019, 12:18:23 AM
Hi by by
Great photographs - being B&W really creates the period feel.
And I love the back story which helps to build a believable picture.
Keep up the good work.
Thanks
Martin




:hellosign: Totally seconded   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 29, 2019, 08:04:03 PM
Here is what I plan to be the penultimate chapter in the history of Wakefield Dairies. (It is a bit long winded!).

Part III
Shortly after the new buildings were completed in 1923, it was noticed that the re-roofing of the old dairy was looking a bit worse for wear. The Wakefield brothers were quite astute businessmen but as Daniel remarked to Edward one day,
“Well we did employ Messrs R. Rogers and W. Earp along with their young helper Billy. We should have known better”. It was decided that the builders who had been responsible for the new buildings, Messrs Taylor Woodrow and George Wimpey, would be called back and asked to re-roof the old dairy building.

Daniel and Edward were good employers and apart from generous wages, the workers were given paid holidays and an extra payment for any work done on a weekend. The brothers basic business premise was i) the welfare of the workers, ii) make high quality affordable dairy products and iii) where possible, make a profit. This was in direct contrast to a lot of employers who put profits before workers. In 1935, John, the son of Daniel and Maria, along with Robert, the son of Edward and Sofia, joined the company.  In 1937, at John’s behest as Estates manager, Wakefield Dairies built 28 cottages near to the dairy, to be rented out to the dairy workers at very reasonable rents. A playground for the children of the workers was also provided.

Shortly after the new dairy buildings were completed, the Wakefield brothers decided to concentrate solely on milk products and production of cheese and butter ceased. In 1939, war broke out in Europe. Wakefield Dairies was again tasked with providing increased supplies of milk products. However, fresh dairy milk was rationed as from November 1941. This did not unduly worry the brothers, as they had, again, received a Government contract, this time to provide ‘Dried Machine Skimmed Milk’, which was for general consumption, along with ‘National Dried Milk’, which was intended for babies.

It was mentioned in Part II that there were no photographs of the official opening of the new buildings by The Lord Lieutenant, Theo Saurus, a man of many words. During the spring of 1944, the Office Manager, Sylvia Overend, was asked by Robert Wakefield, who had been given the job of Accounts Manager, to compile a history of the company. One evening in April, Sylvia took a number of photographs and negatives home – she lived in one of the workers cottages, along with her husband Thomas. The following day, a German bomber pilot, for some unexplained reason, jettisoned his load of bombs whilst flying over the dairy. It was thought that the dairy may have been a target, but this has never been confirmed. Fortunately, in one sense, the dairy, which was running at full capacity, was totally unscathed by the bombing. Unfortunately, many of the bombs fell on and around the workers cottages, totally destroying 18 of them and causing enough damage to necessitate the demolition of another 6. There were no fatalities, as most of the occupants were working in the dairy, but 8 persons, including 4 children, received injuries. The occupants were found new accommodation in nearby villages and the original ‘workers train’, which had stopped running when the cottages were built, was reintroduced.


Picture of the new roof on the old dairy.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192153.jpeg)

The new playground

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192558.jpeg)

Boiler just fired up

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192632.jpeg)

Aerial shot of the site

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192659.jpeg)

The final chapter and photographs will be along in a few days. Thanks for reading.

Addit: The tarmac is grey - honestly. It looks blue because of the light I was using.


Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Newportnobby on January 30, 2019, 09:48:13 AM
That's looking really good, David. Did you Photoshop the smoke or have you fitted a smoke unit in the chimney?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: weave on January 30, 2019, 10:04:39 AM
Hi,

Great pics and story. Looking forward to more.

Cheers weave  :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on January 30, 2019, 10:07:31 AM
Lovely pictures and I like the backstory which helps to paint a picture.
Oh and great modelling too.
This is coming along really nicely.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 30, 2019, 10:26:42 AM
Thanks for the comments Gents, the final (?) Wakefield Dairies chapter will be along soon when I have done a bit more research.
@Newportnobby (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=264) the chimney has a small smoke unit inside Mick. Part of the rim of the unit can just be seen in the last picture.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Milton Rail on January 30, 2019, 11:25:32 AM
Great set of pics and great back story :)  my list of threads to follow keeps getting longer!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 30, 2019, 12:53:05 PM
Okay, the final part, (for now). Must get on and do some more modelling.  :)

Part IV
At the end of the war, nobody in the dairy management team could decide what to do with the bombed workers cottages site, so the site was levelled and a garden area created. Before too long, the workers themselves were asked to vote on proposals for the site and it was agreed that things would remain as they were – the workers were settled in their current locations and many did not have to travel too far to get to the dairy.

Wakefield Dairies came to an agreement with Express Dairies to lease a number of milk tankers for easier and quicker collection of milk. Whilst this was satisfactory, Daniel, Edward, John and Robert decided that, in the long term, it would be cheaper to buy their own wagons. This was agreed and three tankers were subsequently ordered. The tankers are currently with a sign writer having the required painting done.

Edward and Sofia’s daughter, Margaret, married Jack Allen in 1939, just before the declaration of war. Jack served in the Royal Engineers and rose to the rank of Captain. At the end of hostilities, Jack was asked to join the dairy in a post that was loosely called ‘Site Engineer’. He agreed to this, on the condition that a great friend of his, Patrick O’Shaugnessy, (he was from Ireland!), who was also an engineer, could come with him. Jack was brilliant as an engineer and designed a system whereby milk could be pumped from the tankers into the old dairy, which was now basically a holding area. After a while, Jack remarked to his father-in-law that there was so much milk in the old dairy that it was “past your eyes”.  Jack then devised a system so that milk could be pumped direct from the old dairy into the new building which saved time and effort as, prior to this, small vats were manhandled across to the new building. Eventually, the dairy was receiving so much milk from outlying suppliers that an agreement was made with Express Dairies for them to buy milk from Wakefield Dairies at cost, plus a tiny premium. Everybody gained by this arrangement, the milk suppliers were still able to sell all their milk, Express Dairies were saved the cost of collecting the milk and Wakefield Dairies were not making a loss. Jack altered his pumping system so that milk could be pumped into, as well as from, the tankers.

Wakefield Dairies continues to be a family run business to this day, with every single generation being represented.


The last selection of photographs. There is very little life shown, as the photographs were taken on a sunny Sunday afternoon, (apart from the night shots of course).

This shows Jack's pipework

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122508.jpeg)

Jack doing some welding, watched by Patrick

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122606.jpeg)

Night photo'

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122645.jpeg)

Overhead night photo'

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119124356.jpeg)

Looking over car park to play area

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122756.jpeg)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on January 31, 2019, 09:21:01 PM
 :hellosign:.  :greatpicturessign:
  Looking good David & love
the back story  :thumbsup:
    regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on February 01, 2019, 08:31:51 AM
:hellosign:.  :greatpicturessign:
  Looking good David & love
the back story  :thumbsup:
    regards Derek.

Seconded!

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 01, 2019, 08:49:12 AM
Thirded.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 01, 2019, 07:02:19 PM
Lovely photos.
Did you buy those plants in the beds in the car park?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 01, 2019, 07:16:32 PM
@port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230)  Some time ago I bought some cheap plastic trees from China, (or somewhere like that!), and when they arrived I finked to myself "they look cheap and plasticky"  :). When I was looking for something to make the bushes out of -  :idea:. What I did was cut the tops off the trees, 'planted' them using PVA and used little 'blobs' of acrylic paints to look like flowers.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 01, 2019, 07:23:05 PM
@port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230)  Some time ago I bought some cheap plastic trees from China, (or somewhere like that!), and when they arrived I finked to myself "they look cheap and plasticky"  :). When I was looking for something to make the bushes out of -  :idea:. What I did was cut the tops off the trees, 'planted' them using PVA and used little 'blobs' of acrylic paints to look like flowers.
Cunning  -  mefinks.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 04, 2019, 03:56:04 PM
Just a small update.

The three tankers ordered by the Wakefield Dairies management team arrived at the dairy today. Needless to say, everybody is delighted with them.  :) :thumbsup:

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-040219155203.jpeg)

(With thanks to 'Robbies Rolling Stock').
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on February 04, 2019, 04:17:01 PM
Many thanks for the great photograph, David.

These tank wagons look simply spiffing!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on February 04, 2019, 04:38:30 PM
Many thanks for the great photograph, David.

These tank wagons look simply spiffing!

Best wishes.

John
  :hellosign: Gotta agree looking superb
       regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 06, 2019, 07:37:16 PM
Right, we now move away from the Wakefield Dairies story and move to the next stage, a good few years further forward, and concentrate on the Royal Mail site.

Part V

Sadly, Daniel passed away in 1956 and Edward in 1959, although Maria and Sofia, who still take an active part in the running of the dairy, survive. The Directors of Wakefield Dairies were Brian and Michael, sons of John and Ellen, along with Ian, the son of Robert and Louisa. Jane, the daughter of Margaret and Jack, was also a Director. Between them, they decided that the area that had been bombed in 1944, should be sold.

Prior to this, it had been agreed that a small part of the land would be sold to a local builder, Lawrie Barrett, who would be building a few houses. After protracted negotiations, it was agreed that the Royal Mail should be the purchaser, as they were looking for a suitable location for a new depot. The Directors did stipulate a few conditions though. One was that, whilst Royal Mail would have the larger part of the site, some further workers cottages would be built. Royal Mail needed extra sidings to facilitate the loading and unloading of carriages as there was only one line from the mainline to the Wakefield Dairies private sidings – this single line had always been maintained by the dairy. It was therefore, agreed that extra sidings would be laid, with the proviso that Wakefield Dairies could use them, subject to the exigencies of Royal Mail. The extra track was laid first, which would assist in the delivery of materials for the new Royal Mail building. One final stipulation made was that, as the garden area on the site was to go, Royal Mail was to provide some amenity that would benefit the public. It was eventually agreed that a small museum, showing the working practises and vehicles of a bygone age would be created.


Two aerial shots, showing the new sidings, which will be between the Royal Mail depot and the original line to Wakefield Dairies -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-060219155706.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-060219155640.jpeg)

Incidentally, the original line to the dairy is the one adjacent to what is locally called 'The Mountain'.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 06, 2019, 08:38:58 PM
Great stuff. Keep the little back stories coming.
Do yu have an N gauge collection of RM vehicles to display in the museum?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 06, 2019, 08:50:36 PM
@port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230) . I have always known that Averingcliffe would involve the Royal Mail in some way, so I have most if not all of the Oxford Diecast models. I also have some, (unknown make), artics.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 17, 2019, 01:34:27 PM
Here is the next chapter in the history of 'Averingcliffe'.  I mention in the first paragraph about photographs - they will follow. I am waiting on glue drying - whoops!  :))

Part VI
The Royal Mail loading and unloading dock was finally finished, the remainder of the safety railings being delivered, by rail of course, from the suppliers. All of the dock lighting was completed along with most of the yard lighting, by the contractor Mr N. G. Bailey. At the time the following photographs were taken, the access roads and the remainder of the yard lighting was still to be completed, as well as the fitting out of the depot. An old post office and tearoom had been demolished, stone by stone, from a village some 50 miles away, transported to the site by rail and rebuilt on the Royal Mail site.

Mr. Stanley Hamilton, who had worked for the Post Office since completing his National Service in 1953, was asked to run the depot. Stanley had started with the Post office as a postman, getting up at 4am each morning to walk to the sorting office which was about 4 miles from his home. Once there, he sorted his mail for what was called his ‘walk’, had a cup of tea and then set off. Irrespective of the weather, he always got his mail delivered by lunchtime, even though he stopped occasionally to have a word with some of the people on his walk. After delivering the post for a number of years, Stanley was promoted and eventually, as stated, was asked to run the new depot. Stanley discussed the promotion with his wife Anne and, whilst the depot was some 10 miles from their home, it was agreed that Stanley would accept the promotion. He had arranged with Michael Wakefield, the son of John and Ellen that he could be picked up en route each morning. Stanley and Anne were friendly with the Wakefield’s as Anne was a talented dressmaker and had made numerous dresses and the like for the Wakefield ladies. Before the Royal Mail depot was ready to begin operations, the Directors of Wakefield Dairies offered one of the workers cottages to Stanley and Anne who gladly accepted and duly moved in with their 4 children.

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 17, 2019, 04:51:56 PM
As promised, here are some photographs of the Royal Mail depot, showing the new loading dock in place. First we have two general shots of the depot. Two carriages and an articulated lorry have been brought to the site to check that everything fits okay, (there are some very tight tolerances  :sweat:).

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162417-741742355.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162417-741742097.jpeg)

This third shot was taken from the rear of the new museum and tea room, (which still requires work doing to the roof) -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162422-742181310.jpeg)

This shot is an aerial view showing the position of the loading dock in relation to the depot and sidings -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162421-7421877.jpeg)

Then we have two night shots. At the time the photo's were taken, the safety lighting on the loading dock had not been connected to the mains -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162425-742201521.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162426-7422052.jpeg)

There is plenty more work to do with the depot and its environs, including final works on the roadways and more lighting to install, along with gardens and access to the museum and exhibits for the public. It has also been noted that a piece of safety rail on the loading dock has 'gone missing'  ???. The 'elf and safety people have insisted that this be replaced before any more work can be done by the loading dock.   :censored:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 17, 2019, 06:27:35 PM
Thanks for these latest photographs David.
It’s looking good and a Royal Mail depot is certainly a change from the usual breweries, milk depots and china clay dries (I’m guilty of all of those).

And I’m so pleased that Stanley didn’t end up walking 10 miles every day!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on February 17, 2019, 06:36:06 PM
Very interesting photographs, David.  Thank you very much.

I agree with the Health and Safety Officer!

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Phoenix on February 17, 2019, 07:34:36 PM
Lovely photos David,

The Mail depot is a great build.

All best wishes
Kevin

 :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on February 18, 2019, 09:43:06 PM
Lovely photos David,

The Mail depot is a great build.

All best wishes
Kevin

 :beers:
:hellosign:  seconded  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 10, 2019, 03:29:25 PM
Some more work done, so here is the next instalment -

Part VII

The Royal Mail depot has finally been opened and is now fully functioning. There was no ‘official’ opening, but the ribbon cutting ceremony was performed by Stanley and Anne’s two young daughters, Lynne and Diane. The Royal Mail Area Manager, Frank Barrens, along with Brian, Michael and Ian Wakefield and their wives and children were also invited. Some of the villagers were also in attendance. The museum has now been completed and, whilst there are still some more exhibits to be brought to the site, the museum, which is free to enter, (although donations are invited), is now open to the public. There are still some road markings to be laid in and around the depot but it was only last week that the road was resurfaced. It is understood that new street lights will be fitted soon.

Mail and parcels are brought in to the depot usually overnight, with the occasional train load being brought in during the morning. The arrangements made with Wakefield Dairies regarding the milk deliveries by tanker are now working well. There was a little bit of confusion to start with regarding  which line the tankers would be stored on whilst the mail train was brought in, as, of course, everything had to be clear of the main line. However, with the help of a ‘04’ shunter, owned by the dairy, this was soon sorted and the Royal Mail and Wakefield Dairies work happily alongside each other.

The three pairs of semi-detached houses, built on the old bomb site are all fully occupied, with a young family, Michael and Sue Sagar, in the process of moving into number two, the houses defying normal convention being numbered one to six, rather than have alternate numbers. Michael Sagar is having to do some urgent repairs on his car in the garage. (You can see his feet sticking out from under the front of his car).The houses were given the postcode DA5 1DS.
(Think about it!).

Albert and Mary Haigh run two little huts on a spare patch of land which is between the bridge and railway line at the west end of the village. Originally there was just the food hut run by Albert, (Bert), which mainly provided bacon butties for passing trade. It was not the most profitable of businesses and, eventually, Albert and Mary opened the second hut in order for Mary to sell fresh flowers and her dried flower arrangements, which she was extremely good at. Between them, they make enough to have a comfortable living. If you look very carefully, you can see Bert behind his counter.

The first picture is of Bert and Mary's huts
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145657.jpeg)

The next photo's are of the semi-detached houses
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319144605-748001195.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145816.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145858.jpeg)

Then we have an overhead of the Royal Mail depot and Museum by night
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319150155.jpeg)

and in daylight
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319150028.jpeg)

and finally, one of the depot entrance
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145937.jpeg)

Now the more observant amongst you will have noticed that there are no chimney pots on the houses, there is a good reason for that .................... erm ......................... oh yes, a local builder is replacing them all.  ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on March 10, 2019, 03:32:54 PM
Excellent David and thanks for the latest instalment of the back story.
Chimney pots are a nuisance if you are as ham fisted as me. I keep knocking them off!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 10, 2019, 03:35:46 PM

Chimney pots are a nuisance if you are as ham fisted as me. I keep knocking them off!

I admit it, I am as ham fisted as you!  :D. If the layout had been set in the modern era, everybody could have had central heating - no need for chimney pots.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on March 10, 2019, 08:28:12 PM
Many thanks, DA5 1D, for that fascinating post and super photographs.

I really like these Metcalfe 1930s 'semis' and maybe we'll see some on Poppingham.  If I make half as good a job of them as you have, I'll be well pleased.  Amazed, in fact!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 10, 2019, 08:34:20 PM
@Train Waiting (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=6222) Thanks for that John. I must admit that I really like the Metcalfe kits, most of the buildings on Averingcliffe are Metcalfe, although I can think of three that I will try scratch building - the two tram sheds and the six lane engine shed. Glad you have worked the postcode out.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Rowlie on March 10, 2019, 09:14:12 PM
Hi David, enjoying the backstory, bringing your layout to life. Royal Mail depot is very good.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on March 11, 2019, 07:54:19 AM
Just caught up with your thread David. Great stuff!  :thankyousign:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on March 11, 2019, 09:53:45 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
    Many thanks for the updates David, all looking really good & just as an aside many moons ago I worked in the old Royal Mail parcels depot in Leeds with a chap called David Wakefield
     regards Derek
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 11, 2019, 10:16:16 PM
@cornish yorkie (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=4216)  I don't think my late father ever worked at Leeds, but he was at Valley Road Sorting Office, Bradford for a few years.  I wonder if David Wakefield is related to the Wakefield's of the dairy?  ??? ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on March 13, 2019, 10:15:00 PM
  :hellosign: David, yes small world, my mother who was born in Bradford worked at Leeds MLO
    regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 23, 2019, 07:42:00 PM
The next part of the Averingcliffe story is as follows -

Part VIII
In part III it was stated that 18 workers cottages were destroyed in the bombing of 1944 and that another 6 cottages had to be demolished. Further examination of historical records reveals that, in fact, only 4 cottages had to be demolished – it is not known how this historical inaccuracy happened. The cottages were originally numbered 1 to 34 Railway Cuttings, with numbers 1 to 22 being the ones bombed or demolished. Numbers 23 to 34 remain and, whilst some of the cottages are still occupied by dairy workers, some have been sold to ‘incomers’. It is not known exactly how the name ‘Railway Cuttings’ came about, as there is no railway cutting in the vicinity. However, the cottages were built adjacent to some red brick terraced houses and shops which had been built to house workers at the nearby railway maintenance facility. There is a mainline station not too far away which had been built in anticipation of a burgeoning influx of workers although this never really materialised. The station does serve as a point for holiday makers to transfer to a train to take them to the nearby seaside. The original idea for the maintenance facility came about because the owners of the land, the South Tentdale, Exland And Marple Railway, wanted to have one of the most modern maintenance facilities in the country, hoping to attract work from other railway companies. Sadly, this was never fully realised. Part of the facility was later sold to a preserved railway trust.
The occupants of Railway Cuttings vary in age with an elderly couple, Eileen and Frederick Cadamarteri living at number 34. Eileen and Frederick are friendly with the Wakefield family, as Fred, as he is known, originally came from Italy. The occupant of 23 Railway Cuttings was an Anthony Hancock, who had worked at the railway maintenance depot. Tony as he was known could be a cantankerous person and always had something to complain about. It was only last week that Tony had been to a blood donor session in the nearby town, “Never again”, he proclaimed, after giving what he described as “very nearly an arm full”. Numbers 27 and 28 have recently had the roofs replaced. Having seen the results, the other occupants of Railway Cuttings are thinking of replacing their roofs, although Mr. Hancock is, as usual, moaning about what it will cost.


And here we  have some photographs of Railway Cuttings -

Looking from the Royal Mail depot
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191705-7531258.jpeg)

Looking over the wall at the end of Railway Cuttings
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191710-75316130.jpeg)

Looking towards 'The Mountain' from the main road side
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191706-75312803.jpeg)

And finally an aerial shot
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191713-753171186.jpeg)

As you can see, there are a couple of remedial works required on some of the cottages, (flippin' camera close ups  :doh:), and the pavement area is currently being repaired by the Council. These photographs are as taken, I did do a bit of cropping but for some reason, I have 'lost' them on the way to the gallery!   ???
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on March 24, 2019, 05:36:09 PM
 :hellosign:.  :greatpicturessign:
     Thanks David all looking good & thanks for the interesting back story
    regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 24, 2019, 05:40:29 PM
I presume you all got the reference to 'Hancocks Half Hour' and one of the best sketches ever?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: themadhippy on March 24, 2019, 05:50:10 PM
shouldn't  there should be an aerial mast on the chimney of no 23
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 24, 2019, 05:53:56 PM
The aerial will be erected when I find out where the nearest transmitter is and in what direction. (Well, that is my excuse anyway  :P).
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: themadhippy on March 24, 2019, 06:33:54 PM
Quote
The aerial will be erected when I find out where the nearest transmitter is and in what direction.
depends if you want tokyo weather, a game of cards or some bread pudding, but  10°32S 5°22'W might be a good start
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Milton Rail on March 25, 2019, 10:48:46 AM
Lovely work on the buildings, the details and the back story, like the characters you are weaving in :) 
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on March 25, 2019, 11:55:47 AM
Maybe Mr Hancock needs to launch “An Ecnomy Drive” in order to pay for his new roof.  :D
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on April 03, 2019, 04:12:49 PM
David,

From whence came the splendid semi detached houses, as shown in reply 33 on this thread?

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 03, 2019, 06:45:34 PM
@Invicta Alec (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=5868)
The semi-detached houses are 'Metcalfe' kits. I do not think I did any 'bashing' on these. Incidentally, since my previous report in reply #33, the semis have had the chimney pots replaced, so, okay, there has been some kit bashing.  :)

The next chapter, concerning the brick terrace houses, shop and pub, should be appearing over the weekend.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on April 03, 2019, 08:24:37 PM
@Invicta Alec (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=5868)
The semi-detached houses are 'Metcalfe' kits.


David,

Thank you. Unfortunately the Metcalfe semis have been discontinued and I thought you'd found an alternative! Didn't realise they were one and the same thing.

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 03, 2019, 08:35:15 PM
I had two pairs of the semis which I bought a long time ago. When I decided that I wanted a third pair, I had to spend nearly an hour on t'web looking for one as, as you say, they have been discontinued. I eventually found one marked as 'last one', so I actually rang the place in the UK to make sure they had it.   :)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Bealman on April 03, 2019, 08:41:07 PM
Just caught up with this, what with hospital and whatnot (I'm getting out this morning, by the way).

Looking great. I like the configuration of the terraced houses, which is very reminiscent of some not far from where I used to live.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 03, 2019, 08:44:19 PM
@Bealman (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=255)
Thanks for that. Just remember that when you 'get out', you leave the pretty nurses in the hospital.   ;D. I hope things are going well for you now.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Bealman on April 03, 2019, 09:01:53 PM
Cheers, David. It's not as if I'm itching to get out like....

Here I am wide awake and it's still dark!!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 06, 2019, 07:26:21 PM
Here is the next instalment -

Part IX
The four red brick houses, which had been built to accommodate some of the railway workers at the maintenance depot, were at the East end of the village, on a piece of land at the junction of Railway Road and Main Street. Also built at the same time was a corner shop and public house. The public house had, rather unimaginatively, been called ‘The Railway Tavern’ since being built in the late 19th century but this was to change in 1944.

In 1942, the Sir William Stanier designed ‘Duchess of Hamilton' railway engine returned from the United States Of America, having been one of the stars at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. The engine was to be painted in the wartime black colours in 1944, and had one last trip in her magnificent maroon and gold streamlined livery.  Due to bomb damage on the main West Coast line, the Duchess was diverted and had to pass through Averingcliffe. However, on approaching the station, the driver, Ted Harrison, realised that the safety valve was not functioning correctly. Knowing that there was a maintenance depot at Averingcliffe, he stopped in the station and after hasty consultation with the Station Master and a few hurried telephone calls, 'Duchess of Hamilton' was taken to the maintenance facilities and the problem quickly sorted. News of the arrival of the Duchess spread throughout the village and surrounding areas and a large crowd quickly grew in the vicinity of the tracks. Because of this, the local police constable, Edwin Cooke had to call for reinforcements to assist with crowd control.

The visit of the locomotive was the main topic of conversation for weeks and, with permission of the brewery, ‘The Railway Tavern’ became ‘The Duchess’. William Routledge, who lived at 24 Railway Cuttings with his Mother Elizabeth, next door to Anthony Hancock, offered to paint a new sign which he did, completing it a couple of months later. The public house was officially renamed on 1st November that year, shortly before the Duchess was painted in wartime black.

The corner shop was owned by Mr. Arkwright. All manner of things were sold, from bread to vegetables, clothes pegs to fork handles. They also sold milk, obtained from Wakefield Dairies of course. Mr. Arkwright had a reputation of being a bit of a skinflint and, when purchasing the shop from the previous owners, a Mr. and Mrs. Langley, he decided that there was no point in spending money on changing the name.


Here is the pub sign -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191232.jpeg)

Now two photographs showing the houses/pub and shop -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191455.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191423.jpeg)

And the final photo' shows the red brick houses in relation to Railway Cuttings -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191330.jpeg)

There are still some remedial roadworks to be done and one or two of the chimney stacks and pots also need some work.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on April 06, 2019, 07:31:38 PM
Very nice, David.

I now know where to come if I need rubber plugs.

And a pint or two of fine foaming ale afterwards.  I assume keg beer is banned in The 'Duchess'.

Great stuff.

John

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on April 06, 2019, 07:34:20 PM
Great stuff.
Please do keep those splendid updates coming.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 06, 2019, 07:34:35 PM
Keg beer! Away with you Sir!  ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Innovationgame on April 06, 2019, 07:38:32 PM
William Routledge, who lived at 24 Railway Cuttings with his Mother Elizabeth, next door to Anthony Hancock, offered to paint a new sign which he did, completing it a couple of months later.
Did Syd James, Bill Kerr and Hattie Jaques live with Mr Hancock?  :D
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 06, 2019, 07:46:09 PM
What are you suggesting Laurence? Actually, Hattie was the occasional housekeeper to Mr. Hancock.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: GreyWolf on April 07, 2019, 07:01:57 AM
In June 1947, John Le Mesurier went to the Players' Theatre in London, where among the performers was Hattie Jacques. They began to see each other regularly; Le Mesurier was still married, albeit estranged from his wife. In 1949, when his divorce came through, Jacques proposed to Le Mesurier, asking him, "Don't you think it's about time we got married?". The couple married in November 1949 and had two sons.

Jacques began an affair in 1962 with her driver, John Schofield. When she decided to move Schofield into the family home, Le Mesurier moved into a separate room. He later commented: "I could have walked out, but, whatever my feelings, I loved Hattie and the children and I was certain—I had to be certain—that we could repair the damage". The affair caused a downturn in his health; he collapsed on holiday in Tangier in 1963 and was hospitalised in Gibraltar. He returned to London to find the situation between his wife and her lover was unchanged, which caused a relapse.

During the final stages of the breakdown of his marriage, Le Mesurier met Joan Malin at the Establishment club in Soho in 1963. The following year he moved out of his marital house, and that day proposed to Joan, who accepted his offer. Le Mesurier allowed Jacques to bring a divorce suit on grounds of his own infidelity, to ensure that the press blamed him for the break-up, thus avoiding any negative publicity for Jacques. Le Mesurier and Malin married in March 1966. A few months after they were married, Joan began a relationship with Tony Hancock, and left Le Mesurier to move in with the comedian. Hancock was a self-confessed alcoholic and was verbally and physically abusive to Joan during their relationship. After a year together, with Hancock's violence towards her worsening, Joan attempted suicide; she subsequently realised that she could no longer live with Hancock and returned to her husband. Despite this, Le Mesurier remained friends with Hancock, calling him "a comic of true genius, capable of great warmth and generosity, but a tormented and unhappy man". Without Le Mesurier's knowledge, Joan resumed her affair with Hancock and, when the comic moved to Australia in 1968, she planned to follow him if he was able to overcome his alcoholism. She abandoned these plans and remained with Le Mesurier after Hancock committed suicide on 25 June 1968.
[source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Le_Mesurier]
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Innovationgame on April 07, 2019, 07:45:26 AM
Thank you for that informative and full account of 101 things I didn't know about Hattie Jacques. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on April 07, 2019, 09:59:45 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
     Looking really excellent David, very clever storyline   :thumbsup:
Thank you for that informative and full account of 101 things I didn't know about Hattie Jacques. :thumbsup:
  Seconded thanks Greywolf
       regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 27, 2019, 07:49:11 PM
Okay, time for the next instalment

Part X

Sir Andrew and Lady Cooke currently live in the Manor House, situated at the eastern end of the village. The Manor House has been in the Cooke family since the middle of the 19th century, although it has not always stood in its current position.  Sir William Herbert Cooke, (1830-1893), the Great Great Great Grandfather of Sir Andrew, built the original Manor House further south east than its current position. Sir William made his fortune from investing carefully, including a sizeable investment in the South Tentdale, Exland And Marple Railway and eventually became Chairman of the Board.  He was made a Baronet in 1875 mainly because of his philanthropic endeavours. His son, Sir Henry Hubert, carried on his father’s philanthropic way of living. When Sir Henry died in 1925, his son, Hubert Charles, inherited the title and the Manor House.  He had, over the years, invested the family fortune in various enterprises and increased the family wealth. However, nobody was to know that the Great Depression was round the corner. By 1935, the majority of the family fortune was wiped out. The Manor House fell into a state of disrepair and Sir Hubert Charles Cooke, his wife Lady Mary and son Daniel, (nicknamed ‘DC’), were forced to live in just four rooms of the Manor House. All the servants, with the exception of the butler, Parker and the cook, Penelope, (usually referred to as ‘Penny’), were let go. Sir Hubert died in 1938 and it is a long held belief that the Great Depression was the cause of his death.
Things were not as bad as they could have been though, as Sir Henry, the Grandfather of Daniel, with great foresight, had created a trust, (unbeknown to any members of the family), which was activated when his grandson, Daniel, reached 40 years of age. This trust was the saviour of the family. Sir Daniel, as he became when his father died in 1938, had married a lady called Jane and she was herself, from a wealthy family. It was decided in 1945 that, due to the rundown state of the Manor House and its sheer size, a new, smaller, Manor House would be built in the grounds and the original house demolished. Another reason for this decision was that the S.T.E.A.M. Railway wanted to expand their maintenance facility and had approached Sir Daniel with a view to purchasing some of the land adjoining the existing facility. Sir Daniel had carried on the affiliation with the railway company, being a member of the board. However, to allay any fears of a conflict of interest, Sir Daniel resigned his position on the board. A substantial parcel of land was subsequently sold to the railway company and a new maintenance facility was eventually built. Another, smaller parcel of land was sold to a Herbert Padley, a local man who had a reputation as a ‘fixer of mechanicals’ in the area. Herbert built himself a garage on the land and as well as being an excellent mechanic, he installed petrol pumps and sold a few cars and tractors.
Sir Daniel was a generous man and had donated a sizeable sum to the Directors at Wakefields Dairy, to be used for the benefit of the injured during the bombing in 1944. He also donated an amount of money to the local Council on the proviso that street lights were erected along the main street.

Sir Daniel and Lady Jane had one son, Donald Charles Cooke, (known as ‘DCC’) who themselves had one son, the current Sir Andrew. But, the observant reader may have noticed that every male heir, certainly from Sir William onwards, only ever had one son. It was thought that some long forgotten curse was to blame, but Sir Donald and his wife Lady Felicity, surprised everyone after the birth of their son Andrew in 1945, because, they also had a daughter, Susan, although she did take six years to arrive! Sir Donald, with the agreement of the whole family, decided to grow a maze at the rear of the Manor House in celebration. There have been some extensions to the Manor House since it was finally ready to occupy in 1947 and the maze still survives.


First we have some pictures of Mr. Padley's garage, 2 of the frontage and 1 of the rear -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191426-767021098.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191419-766902342.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191427-767021589.jpeg)

Now we have some pictures of the Manor House -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191435-76704517.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191446-767082324.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191440-767062102.jpeg)

An aerial view which shows the maze -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191434-767041804.jpeg)

And finally a night view -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191441-767061822.jpeg)

For those of you interested in the details, the Manor House is a 'bashed' Metcalfe Manor House Farm. The maze was constructed by cutting strips of household scourers, with a bit of scatter err .. 'scattered'. The fountain is also a Metcalfe kit. The lights in the gate posts are fibre optic cable fed by a bulb underneath the board.

There is a bit more history to come regarding the Manor House, but I thought that this post was getting to be a bit long!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on April 27, 2019, 08:39:35 PM
Excellent post David.

Enjoyed the story and the photos of the manor are great.

Thank you.

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on April 28, 2019, 08:57:11 AM
Excellent post David.

Enjoyed the story and the photos of the manor are great.

Thank you.

Alec.

I cannot express these sentiments better than Alec already has, so... seconded!

Many thanks and best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on April 29, 2019, 10:59:08 PM
Excellent post David.

Enjoyed the story and the photos of the manor are great.

Thank you.

Alec.

.
Yes totally agree
regards Derek
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on May 12, 2019, 12:27:10 PM
There is not much to report on the construction side of things, as I have been scratch building a 6 lane engine shed. It has been a bit awkward, as there are hardly any 90 degree angles involved!  :'(

Anyway, we have the next instalment of the history of 'Averingcliffe', followed by some updated pictures.

Part XI
Sir Andrew Cooke has finally taken delivery of his new Austin Princess and to say he is delighted is an understatement. When thinking of buying a new car, he was toying with the idea of getting a Rolls Royce, but decided that that might have been a bit too ostentatious. The car was actually collected a couple of days ago, from the main dealer, by Herbert Padley, who, you may recall, owns the garage in the village. Herbert has been checking over the car and as he said to Sir Andrew when he handed over the car this morning, “She is a real beauty Sir”. Sir Andrew is like a child with a new toy, being in and out of the car all morning and insisting that his wife, Lady Joan, put away her needlework and accompany him on the cars first proper outing. Lady Joan was quite impressed with the comfort and smoothness of the ride.

Whilst the general maintenance of the car will be done by Mr. Padley, the cleaning will be done by the handyman/gardener at the Manor House, Sydney James. Sydney lives in a nearby village and drives over to the Manor house in his Ford Anglia twice a week normally. Sydney is quite friendly with the housekeeper/cook at the Manor House, a widow called Alice McCarthy. Her late husband, Alfred was a fireman on the S.T.E.A.M. Railway who fell from the footplate of an engine when it was derailed following a collision with some cows on the line a number of years previously. Sadly he died from his injuries a few days later. It has been known for Alice to accompany Sydney on the occasional trip in his Anglia.

Sydney is also friendly with Anthony Hancock, who lives in Railway Cuttings and they quite often go for a drink in ‘The Duchess’.

Sir Andrew and Lady Joan do host the occasional dinner party at the Manor House and the Directors and their spouses at Wakefield Dairies can regularly be seen attending various do’s at the Manor house. Once a year, usually on the last Sunday in August, Sir Andrew and Lady Joan, along with the Directors at the dairy, host a street party for the whole village. Everybody is invited and, usually, the weather is kind. Various entertainments are provided, including a clown and Punch and Judy show for the children and, in the evening, the adults are invited to the Manor House for an informal party.


Now for some pictures. The first shows Sir Andrews new Austin princess parked outside the Manor House. The Ford Anglia owned by Syd can be seen at the side, (the building that can be seen at the rear of the Manor House is the new engine shed - more details in the next episode) -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120201.jpeg)

Now we have two photo's of the Royal Mail Depot in 'full swing', followed by the exhibits outside the Museum -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120340.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120310.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120233.jpeg)

Finally, we have a photo' of the garage, showing Mr. Padley attending to a customer -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120415.jpeg)

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on May 12, 2019, 12:35:26 PM
Thanks for the updates David.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on May 12, 2019, 08:40:06 PM
Excellent, David.

Many thanks.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on May 13, 2019, 06:49:21 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:. 
 Many thanks David
     regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on May 30, 2019, 08:18:52 PM
We now have the next chapter in the history of 'Averingcliffe.

Part XII
The new S.T.E.A.M. Railway maintenance facility was finally completed and as many people stated, it looked rather futuristic. The complex housed a 6 lane engine shed which was described as being “crescent shaped, with straight edges and no right angles”.  The shed had none of the usual roof vents, as a system for extracting air had been designed by Jack Allen, the Site Engineer at Wakefield Dairies. He had done this alongside his work at the dairy, although with the permission of the dairy directors as the S.T.E.A.M. Railway had agreed that, in lieu of payment, the shunter engine used by the dairy would be maintained, free of charge, by the staff at the facility.

The original brick built 2 lane engine shed was retained, along with two outside lines. A hoist over one of these lines had been removed many years previously, but it was decided that a new hoist would be erected in the not too distant future. The original shed had been built in 1899. The facility manager, Roy Grace, was an ex-engine driver, so had a lot of knowledge of the workings of steam engines. He was a strict boss with a sense of humour. Sometimes, the staff at the facility did not know whether to laugh or cry when he spoke to them! The staff at the facility included Derek Trotter, who was the Supervisor, (or Boss as he liked to think). Derek’s brother Rodney, Colin Ball, who was the unofficial ‘sweeper upper’, Aubrey Boyce, Mike Fisher, Michael Pearce and Denzil Tulser. Raquel Slater comes to the facility for a couple of hours each day to prepare a lunch for the workers. Derek Trotter is rather keen on Raquel and they have been known to have a drink together in ‘The Duchess’. The Security Officer at the site, Danny', resides at 32 Railway Cuttings, very handy for work!

When the maintenance facility was finally fully operational, Sir Andrew Cooke remarked to his wife, Lady Joan, that, even though he had been privy to the plans, he had not realised just how extensive – and bright - the site was and further added that he was glad that a condition of the planning consent was that, except in an emergency situation, work at the facility would be restricted to the hours between 8am and 8pm, Monday Friday, with work also allowed on Saturday mornings.


Now for some pictures. The first is the view on entering the facility from the main line -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154137-7792522.jpeg)

Then a couple of shots showing the old and new engine sheds -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154139-77925385.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154141-77927206.jpeg)

This photograph is taken from outside the facility, looking over the old shed towards the new shed -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154131-779241704.jpeg)

Now we have an overhead night photograph, taken by an aerial photographer -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154126-779221535.jpeg)

This photograph shows the compound at the entrance to the facility, shown Danny approaching the barrier -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154143-77928104.jpeg)

For those interested in the technical details, the 2 lane shed is a 'Metcalfe' kit and the 6 lane shed was designed and constructed by me! I made it from 1mm Plasticard sandwiched between  printed card, various bits of 'Plastruct' and paint. I have to admit that I am quite pleased with how it turned out, mainly because of its shape. The roof lifts off in case for when a loco' refuses to start.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Newportnobby on May 30, 2019, 08:56:05 PM
Nifty detailing and  :greatpicturessign:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on May 30, 2019, 09:20:55 PM
David,

Thanks for the photographs, the back story and the modelling information. Just giving a splendid post such as this a "like" doesn't seem anywhere near enough.

Well done all round from me!


Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 30, 2019, 09:57:14 PM
i like the contrasting steam shed and the modern TMD facility



thank you for your photos
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on May 31, 2019, 07:47:52 AM
Great modelling David.  :greatpicturessign:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on May 31, 2019, 08:14:03 AM
Great  stuff David.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on May 31, 2019, 04:43:15 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
   All looking really superb David   :thumbsup:
     regards Derek.