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Your Layout and Models => Layout Construction => Topic started by: dannyboy on January 07, 2019, 07:56:17 PM

Title: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 07, 2019, 07:56:17 PM
I have mentioned in a few posts my layout 'Averingcliffe', so I thought it was about time I gave some information.

The layout is approximately 12 feet in length by 2' 6", with the last 2 feet at either end extending to 4 feet. Basically there are two loops and each of the 4 feet pieces at the ends will have a length of track that goes....er....nowhere really. Actually, the one at the left goes to a little seaside halt, whilst the one at the right goes to a harbour, but I have that side set up so I can attach cassettes.  Inside the two loops to the front, there will be lines to a station with two, (three?), platforms, a head shunt to the left and a line to a turntable and workshops etc to the right. To the rear, there will be a line from the inner loop which will feed a 'Royal Mail' depot and a dairy. Before you all ask, no there is no track plan, although this was what I originally envisaged.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/8/main_34834.jpg)

Things have changed a lot since then! That is one big advantage of using Kato Unitrack - I have changed the layout quite a bit since the plan was first formed about 2 years ago.  :o. One of the biggest changes is that there are no tunnels in the corners. There is a large mountain at the rear, just over 4 feet in length, which rises between 2 roads, with two single track tunnels. Travelling clockwise, both loops rise and the outer loop stays at that level through the mountain, whilst the inner loop drops to road level when it exits from the mountain. Talking of roads, they have been changed a lot as well!

What I intend doing is showing my layout 'in bits', together with a bit of history of the area, which is set 'somewhere in England', in an indeterminate, (Rule 1), era.  :-\

The first bit is as follows, ( with some poetic licence) -

This is a photograph of the original dairy on my layout ‘Averingcliffe’. The photo’ was taken in 1909, a few years after the dairy was opened by the two brothers Daniel and Edward Wakefield, in 1903. As you can see, the building is in need of some repairs, including the re-covering of the roof. The brothers were just about managing to run the dairy, with milk being brought in by horse and cart from local farmers and by rail from some of the outlying stations – many of which were nothing more than little halts on the line. Cheese and butter were the mainstays of production. However, within five years, things were to change big time.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/72/4209-070119184747.jpeg)

Prior to the outbreak of WW1, Daniel and Edward met two sisters who had come to the UK at the turn of the century as teenagers. The sisters, Maria and Sofia were from Italy and met the two brothers at the home of a mutual friend.  Maria and Sofia had worked on the family farm near Naples, so had some knowledge of the dairy industry, although Maria had more business acumen than Sofia, who was always ‘hands on’ on the farm. Daniel married Maria in 1912, whilst Edward married Sofia a year later.

Because of the First World War, there was a huge increase in the demand for condensed milk which increased the Wakefield Dairies cash input enormously.  In 1915, the British Government started issuing condensed milk to troops as part of their emergency rations. This further helped to increase revenue at Wakefield Dairies, with the Government awarding a lucrative contract. Due to the Government contract, the workforce was increased with some workers being brought in by train to a nearby small station, with the Wakefield’s paying for a tunnel to be constructed, connecting the station to the dairy. The Wakefield’s had to fight off a strong challenge from the American company Nestlé, who tried to buy them out, having acquired numerous companies and who also had a supply agreement with companies in Australia.

Due to the profits made by the Wakefield Dairy, plans were drawn up for a new dairy and production facility to be built a short distance away. Work started on the new buildings in 1919.


I will release part 2 of the 'Wakefield Dairies' story shortly, when the electrician has done some more work, (I am awaiting some fibre optic cable!). Thank you to those who have read to the end.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on January 07, 2019, 08:02:20 PM
I really like the story and the building. The rickety roof is really good.
So......is the layout finished or is it still under construction?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 07, 2019, 08:07:07 PM
I really like the story and the building. The rickety roof is really good.
So......is the layout finished or is it still under construction?

Thank you for those comments.  :thumbsup:
Q: "is the layout finished or is it still under construction?"
A: Why do you think you are getting the story in bits?  :smiley-laughing: :no:. Now that I am retired, hopefully the progress will be, (a bit), quicker than it has been these last two years.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on January 07, 2019, 09:22:07 PM
Very interesting story and a good picture.

Many thanks.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on January 08, 2019, 10:45:08 PM
 :hellosign: Really like the story, love the old dairy building & looking forward to your next update
    regards Derek
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 14, 2019, 03:15:29 PM

Part II
The new dairy buildings were completed in 1923. The two following photographs were taken a couple of weeks before the official opening, which occurred on 30th June. The weather was fine and dry, with temperatures reaching 73° Fahrenheit according to the local newspaper report. Numerous dignitaries from the county attended, along with the workers, who were given a days wage. Many people from the surrounding villages were invited and travelled in charabancs provided by Daniel and Edward. The new buildings were officially opened by the Lord Lieutenant of the county Sir Theodore Saurus, known to his friends as ‘Theo’. Sir Theodore was a man of many words; in fact, it took him nearly half an hour to officially declare the buildings open! Unfortunately, no photographs of the official opening survive due to bomb damage during World War II, (more details to follow in a later episode).

The new buildings were much larger than was required for the current workload and work force, but the Wakefield’s rationale was that this course of action would allow them to expand the business at a later date, without incurring too much expense. This was to prove an astute move, as later events will show. The loading bay on the side of the building facing the old dairy building, was used for loading horse drawn carts with produce and, increasingly, by the relatively new motorised vehicles. Daniel and Edward decided that it would be more prudent to run a second private siding, between the original siding and the loading bay, to facilitate extra movements. This was finally built in 1929 and as no service was provided by any railway company, they were informed by their lawyers that the provisions of the Railway Act 1921 did not apply.

Edward and Sofia had a son, Robert, exactly nine months to the day after their wedding, which did cause a few raised eyebrows, although Robert was a true ‘honeymoon baby’. Daniel and Maria’s first child, also a son, who they called John, was born three months later. This pleased both sets of parents, as it meant the cousins could grow up together. Daniel and Maria had another child, a daughter, Mary in 1917, whilst Edward and Sofia had a daughter, Margaret, in 1920. It was a real family occasion at the official opening, although the children were in the care of their respective Nanny’s while the parents mingled with the visitors.


The two surviving photographs -


(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-140119144243.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=73166)



(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-140119144331.jpeg) (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=73168)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on January 14, 2019, 07:11:21 PM
Great photographs - being B&W really creates the period feel.
And I love the back story which helps to build a believable picture.
Keep up the good work.
Thanks
Martin


Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on January 15, 2019, 12:18:23 AM
Hi by by
Great photographs - being B&W really creates the period feel.
And I love the back story which helps to build a believable picture.
Keep up the good work.
Thanks
Martin




:hellosign: Totally seconded   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 29, 2019, 08:04:03 PM
Here is what I plan to be the penultimate chapter in the history of Wakefield Dairies. (It is a bit long winded!).

Part III
Shortly after the new buildings were completed in 1923, it was noticed that the re-roofing of the old dairy was looking a bit worse for wear. The Wakefield brothers were quite astute businessmen but as Daniel remarked to Edward one day,
“Well we did employ Messrs R. Rogers and W. Earp along with their young helper Billy. We should have known better”. It was decided that the builders who had been responsible for the new buildings, Messrs Taylor Woodrow and George Wimpey, would be called back and asked to re-roof the old dairy building.

Daniel and Edward were good employers and apart from generous wages, the workers were given paid holidays and an extra payment for any work done on a weekend. The brothers basic business premise was i) the welfare of the workers, ii) make high quality affordable dairy products and iii) where possible, make a profit. This was in direct contrast to a lot of employers who put profits before workers. In 1935, John, the son of Daniel and Maria, along with Robert, the son of Edward and Sofia, joined the company.  In 1937, at John’s behest as Estates manager, Wakefield Dairies built 28 cottages near to the dairy, to be rented out to the dairy workers at very reasonable rents. A playground for the children of the workers was also provided.

Shortly after the new dairy buildings were completed, the Wakefield brothers decided to concentrate solely on milk products and production of cheese and butter ceased. In 1939, war broke out in Europe. Wakefield Dairies was again tasked with providing increased supplies of milk products. However, fresh dairy milk was rationed as from November 1941. This did not unduly worry the brothers, as they had, again, received a Government contract, this time to provide ‘Dried Machine Skimmed Milk’, which was for general consumption, along with ‘National Dried Milk’, which was intended for babies.

It was mentioned in Part II that there were no photographs of the official opening of the new buildings by The Lord Lieutenant, Theo Saurus, a man of many words. During the spring of 1944, the Office Manager, Sylvia Overend, was asked by Robert Wakefield, who had been given the job of Accounts Manager, to compile a history of the company. One evening in April, Sylvia took a number of photographs and negatives home – she lived in one of the workers cottages, along with her husband Thomas. The following day, a German bomber pilot, for some unexplained reason, jettisoned his load of bombs whilst flying over the dairy. It was thought that the dairy may have been a target, but this has never been confirmed. Fortunately, in one sense, the dairy, which was running at full capacity, was totally unscathed by the bombing. Unfortunately, many of the bombs fell on and around the workers cottages, totally destroying 18 of them and causing enough damage to necessitate the demolition of another 6. There were no fatalities, as most of the occupants were working in the dairy, but 8 persons, including 4 children, received injuries. The occupants were found new accommodation in nearby villages and the original ‘workers train’, which had stopped running when the cottages were built, was reintroduced.


Picture of the new roof on the old dairy.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192153.jpeg)

The new playground

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192558.jpeg)

Boiler just fired up

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192632.jpeg)

Aerial shot of the site

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-290119192659.jpeg)

The final chapter and photographs will be along in a few days. Thanks for reading.

Addit: The tarmac is grey - honestly. It looks blue because of the light I was using.


Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Newportnobby on January 30, 2019, 09:48:13 AM
That's looking really good, David. Did you Photoshop the smoke or have you fitted a smoke unit in the chimney?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: weave on January 30, 2019, 10:04:39 AM
Hi,

Great pics and story. Looking forward to more.

Cheers weave  :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on January 30, 2019, 10:07:31 AM
Lovely pictures and I like the backstory which helps to paint a picture.
Oh and great modelling too.
This is coming along really nicely.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 30, 2019, 10:26:42 AM
Thanks for the comments Gents, the final (?) Wakefield Dairies chapter will be along soon when I have done a bit more research.
@Newportnobby (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=264) the chimney has a small smoke unit inside Mick. Part of the rim of the unit can just be seen in the last picture.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Milton Rail on January 30, 2019, 11:25:32 AM
Great set of pics and great back story :)  my list of threads to follow keeps getting longer!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on January 30, 2019, 12:53:05 PM
Okay, the final part, (for now). Must get on and do some more modelling.  :)

Part IV
At the end of the war, nobody in the dairy management team could decide what to do with the bombed workers cottages site, so the site was levelled and a garden area created. Before too long, the workers themselves were asked to vote on proposals for the site and it was agreed that things would remain as they were – the workers were settled in their current locations and many did not have to travel too far to get to the dairy.

Wakefield Dairies came to an agreement with Express Dairies to lease a number of milk tankers for easier and quicker collection of milk. Whilst this was satisfactory, Daniel, Edward, John and Robert decided that, in the long term, it would be cheaper to buy their own wagons. This was agreed and three tankers were subsequently ordered. The tankers are currently with a sign writer having the required painting done.

Edward and Sofia’s daughter, Margaret, married Jack Allen in 1939, just before the declaration of war. Jack served in the Royal Engineers and rose to the rank of Captain. At the end of hostilities, Jack was asked to join the dairy in a post that was loosely called ‘Site Engineer’. He agreed to this, on the condition that a great friend of his, Patrick O’Shaugnessy, (he was from Ireland!), who was also an engineer, could come with him. Jack was brilliant as an engineer and designed a system whereby milk could be pumped from the tankers into the old dairy, which was now basically a holding area. After a while, Jack remarked to his father-in-law that there was so much milk in the old dairy that it was “past your eyes”.  Jack then devised a system so that milk could be pumped direct from the old dairy into the new building which saved time and effort as, prior to this, small vats were manhandled across to the new building. Eventually, the dairy was receiving so much milk from outlying suppliers that an agreement was made with Express Dairies for them to buy milk from Wakefield Dairies at cost, plus a tiny premium. Everybody gained by this arrangement, the milk suppliers were still able to sell all their milk, Express Dairies were saved the cost of collecting the milk and Wakefield Dairies were not making a loss. Jack altered his pumping system so that milk could be pumped into, as well as from, the tankers.

Wakefield Dairies continues to be a family run business to this day, with every single generation being represented.


The last selection of photographs. There is very little life shown, as the photographs were taken on a sunny Sunday afternoon, (apart from the night shots of course).

This shows Jack's pipework

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122508.jpeg)

Jack doing some welding, watched by Patrick

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122606.jpeg)

Night photo'

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122645.jpeg)

Overhead night photo'

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119124356.jpeg)

Looking over car park to play area

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-300119122756.jpeg)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on January 31, 2019, 09:21:01 PM
 :hellosign:.  :greatpicturessign:
  Looking good David & love
the back story  :thumbsup:
    regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on February 01, 2019, 08:31:51 AM
:hellosign:.  :greatpicturessign:
  Looking good David & love
the back story  :thumbsup:
    regards Derek.

Seconded!

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 01, 2019, 08:49:12 AM
Thirded.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 01, 2019, 07:02:19 PM
Lovely photos.
Did you buy those plants in the beds in the car park?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 01, 2019, 07:16:32 PM
@port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230)  Some time ago I bought some cheap plastic trees from China, (or somewhere like that!), and when they arrived I finked to myself "they look cheap and plasticky"  :). When I was looking for something to make the bushes out of -  :idea:. What I did was cut the tops off the trees, 'planted' them using PVA and used little 'blobs' of acrylic paints to look like flowers.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 01, 2019, 07:23:05 PM
@port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230)  Some time ago I bought some cheap plastic trees from China, (or somewhere like that!), and when they arrived I finked to myself "they look cheap and plasticky"  :). When I was looking for something to make the bushes out of -  :idea:. What I did was cut the tops off the trees, 'planted' them using PVA and used little 'blobs' of acrylic paints to look like flowers.
Cunning  -  mefinks.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 04, 2019, 03:56:04 PM
Just a small update.

The three tankers ordered by the Wakefield Dairies management team arrived at the dairy today. Needless to say, everybody is delighted with them.  :) :thumbsup:

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-040219155203.jpeg)

(With thanks to 'Robbies Rolling Stock').
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on February 04, 2019, 04:17:01 PM
Many thanks for the great photograph, David.

These tank wagons look simply spiffing!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on February 04, 2019, 04:38:30 PM
Many thanks for the great photograph, David.

These tank wagons look simply spiffing!

Best wishes.

John
  :hellosign: Gotta agree looking superb
       regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 06, 2019, 07:37:16 PM
Right, we now move away from the Wakefield Dairies story and move to the next stage, a good few years further forward, and concentrate on the Royal Mail site.

Part V

Sadly, Daniel passed away in 1956 and Edward in 1959, although Maria and Sofia, who still take an active part in the running of the dairy, survive. The Directors of Wakefield Dairies were Brian and Michael, sons of John and Ellen, along with Ian, the son of Robert and Louisa. Jane, the daughter of Margaret and Jack, was also a Director. Between them, they decided that the area that had been bombed in 1944, should be sold.

Prior to this, it had been agreed that a small part of the land would be sold to a local builder, Lawrie Barrett, who would be building a few houses. After protracted negotiations, it was agreed that the Royal Mail should be the purchaser, as they were looking for a suitable location for a new depot. The Directors did stipulate a few conditions though. One was that, whilst Royal Mail would have the larger part of the site, some further workers cottages would be built. Royal Mail needed extra sidings to facilitate the loading and unloading of carriages as there was only one line from the mainline to the Wakefield Dairies private sidings – this single line had always been maintained by the dairy. It was therefore, agreed that extra sidings would be laid, with the proviso that Wakefield Dairies could use them, subject to the exigencies of Royal Mail. The extra track was laid first, which would assist in the delivery of materials for the new Royal Mail building. One final stipulation made was that, as the garden area on the site was to go, Royal Mail was to provide some amenity that would benefit the public. It was eventually agreed that a small museum, showing the working practises and vehicles of a bygone age would be created.


Two aerial shots, showing the new sidings, which will be between the Royal Mail depot and the original line to Wakefield Dairies -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-060219155706.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/73/4209-060219155640.jpeg)

Incidentally, the original line to the dairy is the one adjacent to what is locally called 'The Mountain'.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 06, 2019, 08:38:58 PM
Great stuff. Keep the little back stories coming.
Do yu have an N gauge collection of RM vehicles to display in the museum?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 06, 2019, 08:50:36 PM
@port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230) . I have always known that Averingcliffe would involve the Royal Mail in some way, so I have most if not all of the Oxford Diecast models. I also have some, (unknown make), artics.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 17, 2019, 01:34:27 PM
Here is the next chapter in the history of 'Averingcliffe'.  I mention in the first paragraph about photographs - they will follow. I am waiting on glue drying - whoops!  :))

Part VI
The Royal Mail loading and unloading dock was finally finished, the remainder of the safety railings being delivered, by rail of course, from the suppliers. All of the dock lighting was completed along with most of the yard lighting, by the contractor Mr N. G. Bailey. At the time the following photographs were taken, the access roads and the remainder of the yard lighting was still to be completed, as well as the fitting out of the depot. An old post office and tearoom had been demolished, stone by stone, from a village some 50 miles away, transported to the site by rail and rebuilt on the Royal Mail site.

Mr. Stanley Hamilton, who had worked for the Post Office since completing his National Service in 1953, was asked to run the depot. Stanley had started with the Post office as a postman, getting up at 4am each morning to walk to the sorting office which was about 4 miles from his home. Once there, he sorted his mail for what was called his ‘walk’, had a cup of tea and then set off. Irrespective of the weather, he always got his mail delivered by lunchtime, even though he stopped occasionally to have a word with some of the people on his walk. After delivering the post for a number of years, Stanley was promoted and eventually, as stated, was asked to run the new depot. Stanley discussed the promotion with his wife Anne and, whilst the depot was some 10 miles from their home, it was agreed that Stanley would accept the promotion. He had arranged with Michael Wakefield, the son of John and Ellen that he could be picked up en route each morning. Stanley and Anne were friendly with the Wakefield’s as Anne was a talented dressmaker and had made numerous dresses and the like for the Wakefield ladies. Before the Royal Mail depot was ready to begin operations, the Directors of Wakefield Dairies offered one of the workers cottages to Stanley and Anne who gladly accepted and duly moved in with their 4 children.

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on February 17, 2019, 04:51:56 PM
As promised, here are some photographs of the Royal Mail depot, showing the new loading dock in place. First we have two general shots of the depot. Two carriages and an articulated lorry have been brought to the site to check that everything fits okay, (there are some very tight tolerances  :sweat:).

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162417-741742355.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162417-741742097.jpeg)

This third shot was taken from the rear of the new museum and tea room, (which still requires work doing to the roof) -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162422-742181310.jpeg)

This shot is an aerial view showing the position of the loading dock in relation to the depot and sidings -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162421-7421877.jpeg)

Then we have two night shots. At the time the photo's were taken, the safety lighting on the loading dock had not been connected to the mains -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162425-742201521.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-170219162426-7422052.jpeg)

There is plenty more work to do with the depot and its environs, including final works on the roadways and more lighting to install, along with gardens and access to the museum and exhibits for the public. It has also been noted that a piece of safety rail on the loading dock has 'gone missing'  ???. The 'elf and safety people have insisted that this be replaced before any more work can be done by the loading dock.   :censored:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on February 17, 2019, 06:27:35 PM
Thanks for these latest photographs David.
It’s looking good and a Royal Mail depot is certainly a change from the usual breweries, milk depots and china clay dries (I’m guilty of all of those).

And I’m so pleased that Stanley didn’t end up walking 10 miles every day!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on February 17, 2019, 06:36:06 PM
Very interesting photographs, David.  Thank you very much.

I agree with the Health and Safety Officer!

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Phoenix on February 17, 2019, 07:34:36 PM
Lovely photos David,

The Mail depot is a great build.

All best wishes
Kevin

 :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on February 18, 2019, 09:43:06 PM
Lovely photos David,

The Mail depot is a great build.

All best wishes
Kevin

 :beers:
:hellosign:  seconded  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 10, 2019, 03:29:25 PM
Some more work done, so here is the next instalment -

Part VII

The Royal Mail depot has finally been opened and is now fully functioning. There was no ‘official’ opening, but the ribbon cutting ceremony was performed by Stanley and Anne’s two young daughters, Lynne and Diane. The Royal Mail Area Manager, Frank Barrens, along with Brian, Michael and Ian Wakefield and their wives and children were also invited. Some of the villagers were also in attendance. The museum has now been completed and, whilst there are still some more exhibits to be brought to the site, the museum, which is free to enter, (although donations are invited), is now open to the public. There are still some road markings to be laid in and around the depot but it was only last week that the road was resurfaced. It is understood that new street lights will be fitted soon.

Mail and parcels are brought in to the depot usually overnight, with the occasional train load being brought in during the morning. The arrangements made with Wakefield Dairies regarding the milk deliveries by tanker are now working well. There was a little bit of confusion to start with regarding  which line the tankers would be stored on whilst the mail train was brought in, as, of course, everything had to be clear of the main line. However, with the help of a ‘04’ shunter, owned by the dairy, this was soon sorted and the Royal Mail and Wakefield Dairies work happily alongside each other.

The three pairs of semi-detached houses, built on the old bomb site are all fully occupied, with a young family, Michael and Sue Sagar, in the process of moving into number two, the houses defying normal convention being numbered one to six, rather than have alternate numbers. Michael Sagar is having to do some urgent repairs on his car in the garage. (You can see his feet sticking out from under the front of his car).The houses were given the postcode DA5 1DS.
(Think about it!).

Albert and Mary Haigh run two little huts on a spare patch of land which is between the bridge and railway line at the west end of the village. Originally there was just the food hut run by Albert, (Bert), which mainly provided bacon butties for passing trade. It was not the most profitable of businesses and, eventually, Albert and Mary opened the second hut in order for Mary to sell fresh flowers and her dried flower arrangements, which she was extremely good at. Between them, they make enough to have a comfortable living. If you look very carefully, you can see Bert behind his counter.

The first picture is of Bert and Mary's huts
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145657.jpeg)

The next photo's are of the semi-detached houses
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319144605-748001195.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145816.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145858.jpeg)

Then we have an overhead of the Royal Mail depot and Museum by night
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319150155.jpeg)

and in daylight
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319150028.jpeg)

and finally, one of the depot entrance
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/74/4209-100319145937.jpeg)

Now the more observant amongst you will have noticed that there are no chimney pots on the houses, there is a good reason for that .................... erm ......................... oh yes, a local builder is replacing them all.  ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on March 10, 2019, 03:32:54 PM
Excellent David and thanks for the latest instalment of the back story.
Chimney pots are a nuisance if you are as ham fisted as me. I keep knocking them off!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 10, 2019, 03:35:46 PM

Chimney pots are a nuisance if you are as ham fisted as me. I keep knocking them off!

I admit it, I am as ham fisted as you!  :D. If the layout had been set in the modern era, everybody could have had central heating - no need for chimney pots.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on March 10, 2019, 08:28:12 PM
Many thanks, DA5 1D, for that fascinating post and super photographs.

I really like these Metcalfe 1930s 'semis' and maybe we'll see some on Poppingham.  If I make half as good a job of them as you have, I'll be well pleased.  Amazed, in fact!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 10, 2019, 08:34:20 PM
@Train Waiting (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=6222) Thanks for that John. I must admit that I really like the Metcalfe kits, most of the buildings on Averingcliffe are Metcalfe, although I can think of three that I will try scratch building - the two tram sheds and the six lane engine shed. Glad you have worked the postcode out.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Rowlie on March 10, 2019, 09:14:12 PM
Hi David, enjoying the backstory, bringing your layout to life. Royal Mail depot is very good.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on March 11, 2019, 07:54:19 AM
Just caught up with your thread David. Great stuff!  :thankyousign:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on March 11, 2019, 09:53:45 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
    Many thanks for the updates David, all looking really good & just as an aside many moons ago I worked in the old Royal Mail parcels depot in Leeds with a chap called David Wakefield
     regards Derek
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 11, 2019, 10:16:16 PM
@cornish yorkie (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=4216)  I don't think my late father ever worked at Leeds, but he was at Valley Road Sorting Office, Bradford for a few years.  I wonder if David Wakefield is related to the Wakefield's of the dairy?  ??? ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on March 13, 2019, 10:15:00 PM
  :hellosign: David, yes small world, my mother who was born in Bradford worked at Leeds MLO
    regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 23, 2019, 07:42:00 PM
The next part of the Averingcliffe story is as follows -

Part VIII
In part III it was stated that 18 workers cottages were destroyed in the bombing of 1944 and that another 6 cottages had to be demolished. Further examination of historical records reveals that, in fact, only 4 cottages had to be demolished – it is not known how this historical inaccuracy happened. The cottages were originally numbered 1 to 34 Railway Cuttings, with numbers 1 to 22 being the ones bombed or demolished. Numbers 23 to 34 remain and, whilst some of the cottages are still occupied by dairy workers, some have been sold to ‘incomers’. It is not known exactly how the name ‘Railway Cuttings’ came about, as there is no railway cutting in the vicinity. However, the cottages were built adjacent to some red brick terraced houses and shops which had been built to house workers at the nearby railway maintenance facility. There is a mainline station not too far away which had been built in anticipation of a burgeoning influx of workers although this never really materialised. The station does serve as a point for holiday makers to transfer to a train to take them to the nearby seaside. The original idea for the maintenance facility came about because the owners of the land, the South Tentdale, Exland And Marple Railway, wanted to have one of the most modern maintenance facilities in the country, hoping to attract work from other railway companies. Sadly, this was never fully realised. Part of the facility was later sold to a preserved railway trust.
The occupants of Railway Cuttings vary in age with an elderly couple, Eileen and Frederick Cadamarteri living at number 34. Eileen and Frederick are friendly with the Wakefield family, as Fred, as he is known, originally came from Italy. The occupant of 23 Railway Cuttings was an Anthony Hancock, who had worked at the railway maintenance depot. Tony as he was known could be a cantankerous person and always had something to complain about. It was only last week that Tony had been to a blood donor session in the nearby town, “Never again”, he proclaimed, after giving what he described as “very nearly an arm full”. Numbers 27 and 28 have recently had the roofs replaced. Having seen the results, the other occupants of Railway Cuttings are thinking of replacing their roofs, although Mr. Hancock is, as usual, moaning about what it will cost.


And here we  have some photographs of Railway Cuttings -

Looking from the Royal Mail depot
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191705-7531258.jpeg)

Looking over the wall at the end of Railway Cuttings
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191710-75316130.jpeg)

Looking towards 'The Mountain' from the main road side
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191706-75312803.jpeg)

And finally an aerial shot
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-230319191713-753171186.jpeg)

As you can see, there are a couple of remedial works required on some of the cottages, (flippin' camera close ups  :doh:), and the pavement area is currently being repaired by the Council. These photographs are as taken, I did do a bit of cropping but for some reason, I have 'lost' them on the way to the gallery!   ???
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on March 24, 2019, 05:36:09 PM
 :hellosign:.  :greatpicturessign:
     Thanks David all looking good & thanks for the interesting back story
    regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 24, 2019, 05:40:29 PM
I presume you all got the reference to 'Hancocks Half Hour' and one of the best sketches ever?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: themadhippy on March 24, 2019, 05:50:10 PM
shouldn't  there should be an aerial mast on the chimney of no 23
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on March 24, 2019, 05:53:56 PM
The aerial will be erected when I find out where the nearest transmitter is and in what direction. (Well, that is my excuse anyway  :P).
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: themadhippy on March 24, 2019, 06:33:54 PM
Quote
The aerial will be erected when I find out where the nearest transmitter is and in what direction.
depends if you want tokyo weather, a game of cards or some bread pudding, but  10°32S 5°22'W might be a good start
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Milton Rail on March 25, 2019, 10:48:46 AM
Lovely work on the buildings, the details and the back story, like the characters you are weaving in :) 
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on March 25, 2019, 11:55:47 AM
Maybe Mr Hancock needs to launch “An Ecnomy Drive” in order to pay for his new roof.  :D
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on April 03, 2019, 04:12:49 PM
David,

From whence came the splendid semi detached houses, as shown in reply 33 on this thread?

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 03, 2019, 06:45:34 PM
@Invicta Alec (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=5868)
The semi-detached houses are 'Metcalfe' kits. I do not think I did any 'bashing' on these. Incidentally, since my previous report in reply #33, the semis have had the chimney pots replaced, so, okay, there has been some kit bashing.  :)

The next chapter, concerning the brick terrace houses, shop and pub, should be appearing over the weekend.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on April 03, 2019, 08:24:37 PM
@Invicta Alec (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=5868)
The semi-detached houses are 'Metcalfe' kits.


David,

Thank you. Unfortunately the Metcalfe semis have been discontinued and I thought you'd found an alternative! Didn't realise they were one and the same thing.

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 03, 2019, 08:35:15 PM
I had two pairs of the semis which I bought a long time ago. When I decided that I wanted a third pair, I had to spend nearly an hour on t'web looking for one as, as you say, they have been discontinued. I eventually found one marked as 'last one', so I actually rang the place in the UK to make sure they had it.   :)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Bealman on April 03, 2019, 08:41:07 PM
Just caught up with this, what with hospital and whatnot (I'm getting out this morning, by the way).

Looking great. I like the configuration of the terraced houses, which is very reminiscent of some not far from where I used to live.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 03, 2019, 08:44:19 PM
@Bealman (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=255)
Thanks for that. Just remember that when you 'get out', you leave the pretty nurses in the hospital.   ;D. I hope things are going well for you now.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Bealman on April 03, 2019, 09:01:53 PM
Cheers, David. It's not as if I'm itching to get out like....

Here I am wide awake and it's still dark!!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 06, 2019, 07:26:21 PM
Here is the next instalment -

Part IX
The four red brick houses, which had been built to accommodate some of the railway workers at the maintenance depot, were at the East end of the village, on a piece of land at the junction of Railway Road and Main Street. Also built at the same time was a corner shop and public house. The public house had, rather unimaginatively, been called ‘The Railway Tavern’ since being built in the late 19th century but this was to change in 1944.

In 1942, the Sir William Stanier designed ‘Duchess of Hamilton' railway engine returned from the United States Of America, having been one of the stars at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. The engine was to be painted in the wartime black colours in 1944, and had one last trip in her magnificent maroon and gold streamlined livery.  Due to bomb damage on the main West Coast line, the Duchess was diverted and had to pass through Averingcliffe. However, on approaching the station, the driver, Ted Harrison, realised that the safety valve was not functioning correctly. Knowing that there was a maintenance depot at Averingcliffe, he stopped in the station and after hasty consultation with the Station Master and a few hurried telephone calls, 'Duchess of Hamilton' was taken to the maintenance facilities and the problem quickly sorted. News of the arrival of the Duchess spread throughout the village and surrounding areas and a large crowd quickly grew in the vicinity of the tracks. Because of this, the local police constable, Edwin Cooke had to call for reinforcements to assist with crowd control.

The visit of the locomotive was the main topic of conversation for weeks and, with permission of the brewery, ‘The Railway Tavern’ became ‘The Duchess’. William Routledge, who lived at 24 Railway Cuttings with his Mother Elizabeth, next door to Anthony Hancock, offered to paint a new sign which he did, completing it a couple of months later. The public house was officially renamed on 1st November that year, shortly before the Duchess was painted in wartime black.

The corner shop was owned by Mr. Arkwright. All manner of things were sold, from bread to vegetables, clothes pegs to fork handles. They also sold milk, obtained from Wakefield Dairies of course. Mr. Arkwright had a reputation of being a bit of a skinflint and, when purchasing the shop from the previous owners, a Mr. and Mrs. Langley, he decided that there was no point in spending money on changing the name.


Here is the pub sign -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191232.jpeg)

Now two photographs showing the houses/pub and shop -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191455.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191423.jpeg)

And the final photo' shows the red brick houses in relation to Railway Cuttings -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/75/4209-060419191330.jpeg)

There are still some remedial roadworks to be done and one or two of the chimney stacks and pots also need some work.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on April 06, 2019, 07:31:38 PM
Very nice, David.

I now know where to come if I need rubber plugs.

And a pint or two of fine foaming ale afterwards.  I assume keg beer is banned in The 'Duchess'.

Great stuff.

John

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on April 06, 2019, 07:34:20 PM
Great stuff.
Please do keep those splendid updates coming.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 06, 2019, 07:34:35 PM
Keg beer! Away with you Sir!  ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Innovationgame on April 06, 2019, 07:38:32 PM
William Routledge, who lived at 24 Railway Cuttings with his Mother Elizabeth, next door to Anthony Hancock, offered to paint a new sign which he did, completing it a couple of months later.
Did Syd James, Bill Kerr and Hattie Jaques live with Mr Hancock?  :D
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 06, 2019, 07:46:09 PM
What are you suggesting Laurence? Actually, Hattie was the occasional housekeeper to Mr. Hancock.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: GreyWolf on April 07, 2019, 07:01:57 AM
In June 1947, John Le Mesurier went to the Players' Theatre in London, where among the performers was Hattie Jacques. They began to see each other regularly; Le Mesurier was still married, albeit estranged from his wife. In 1949, when his divorce came through, Jacques proposed to Le Mesurier, asking him, "Don't you think it's about time we got married?". The couple married in November 1949 and had two sons.

Jacques began an affair in 1962 with her driver, John Schofield. When she decided to move Schofield into the family home, Le Mesurier moved into a separate room. He later commented: "I could have walked out, but, whatever my feelings, I loved Hattie and the children and I was certain—I had to be certain—that we could repair the damage". The affair caused a downturn in his health; he collapsed on holiday in Tangier in 1963 and was hospitalised in Gibraltar. He returned to London to find the situation between his wife and her lover was unchanged, which caused a relapse.

During the final stages of the breakdown of his marriage, Le Mesurier met Joan Malin at the Establishment club in Soho in 1963. The following year he moved out of his marital house, and that day proposed to Joan, who accepted his offer. Le Mesurier allowed Jacques to bring a divorce suit on grounds of his own infidelity, to ensure that the press blamed him for the break-up, thus avoiding any negative publicity for Jacques. Le Mesurier and Malin married in March 1966. A few months after they were married, Joan began a relationship with Tony Hancock, and left Le Mesurier to move in with the comedian. Hancock was a self-confessed alcoholic and was verbally and physically abusive to Joan during their relationship. After a year together, with Hancock's violence towards her worsening, Joan attempted suicide; she subsequently realised that she could no longer live with Hancock and returned to her husband. Despite this, Le Mesurier remained friends with Hancock, calling him "a comic of true genius, capable of great warmth and generosity, but a tormented and unhappy man". Without Le Mesurier's knowledge, Joan resumed her affair with Hancock and, when the comic moved to Australia in 1968, she planned to follow him if he was able to overcome his alcoholism. She abandoned these plans and remained with Le Mesurier after Hancock committed suicide on 25 June 1968.
[source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Le_Mesurier]
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Innovationgame on April 07, 2019, 07:45:26 AM
Thank you for that informative and full account of 101 things I didn't know about Hattie Jacques. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on April 07, 2019, 09:59:45 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
     Looking really excellent David, very clever storyline   :thumbsup:
Thank you for that informative and full account of 101 things I didn't know about Hattie Jacques. :thumbsup:
  Seconded thanks Greywolf
       regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on April 27, 2019, 07:49:11 PM
Okay, time for the next instalment

Part X

Sir Andrew and Lady Cooke currently live in the Manor House, situated at the eastern end of the village. The Manor House has been in the Cooke family since the middle of the 19th century, although it has not always stood in its current position.  Sir William Herbert Cooke, (1830-1893), the Great Great Great Grandfather of Sir Andrew, built the original Manor House further south east than its current position. Sir William made his fortune from investing carefully, including a sizeable investment in the South Tentdale, Exland And Marple Railway and eventually became Chairman of the Board.  He was made a Baronet in 1875 mainly because of his philanthropic endeavours. His son, Sir Henry Hubert, carried on his father’s philanthropic way of living. When Sir Henry died in 1925, his son, Hubert Charles, inherited the title and the Manor House.  He had, over the years, invested the family fortune in various enterprises and increased the family wealth. However, nobody was to know that the Great Depression was round the corner. By 1935, the majority of the family fortune was wiped out. The Manor House fell into a state of disrepair and Sir Hubert Charles Cooke, his wife Lady Mary and son Daniel, (nicknamed ‘DC’), were forced to live in just four rooms of the Manor House. All the servants, with the exception of the butler, Parker and the cook, Penelope, (usually referred to as ‘Penny’), were let go. Sir Hubert died in 1938 and it is a long held belief that the Great Depression was the cause of his death.
Things were not as bad as they could have been though, as Sir Henry, the Grandfather of Daniel, with great foresight, had created a trust, (unbeknown to any members of the family), which was activated when his grandson, Daniel, reached 40 years of age. This trust was the saviour of the family. Sir Daniel, as he became when his father died in 1938, had married a lady called Jane and she was herself, from a wealthy family. It was decided in 1945 that, due to the rundown state of the Manor House and its sheer size, a new, smaller, Manor House would be built in the grounds and the original house demolished. Another reason for this decision was that the S.T.E.A.M. Railway wanted to expand their maintenance facility and had approached Sir Daniel with a view to purchasing some of the land adjoining the existing facility. Sir Daniel had carried on the affiliation with the railway company, being a member of the board. However, to allay any fears of a conflict of interest, Sir Daniel resigned his position on the board. A substantial parcel of land was subsequently sold to the railway company and a new maintenance facility was eventually built. Another, smaller parcel of land was sold to a Herbert Padley, a local man who had a reputation as a ‘fixer of mechanicals’ in the area. Herbert built himself a garage on the land and as well as being an excellent mechanic, he installed petrol pumps and sold a few cars and tractors.
Sir Daniel was a generous man and had donated a sizeable sum to the Directors at Wakefields Dairy, to be used for the benefit of the injured during the bombing in 1944. He also donated an amount of money to the local Council on the proviso that street lights were erected along the main street.

Sir Daniel and Lady Jane had one son, Donald Charles Cooke, (known as ‘DCC’) who themselves had one son, the current Sir Andrew. But, the observant reader may have noticed that every male heir, certainly from Sir William onwards, only ever had one son. It was thought that some long forgotten curse was to blame, but Sir Donald and his wife Lady Felicity, surprised everyone after the birth of their son Andrew in 1945, because, they also had a daughter, Susan, although she did take six years to arrive! Sir Donald, with the agreement of the whole family, decided to grow a maze at the rear of the Manor House in celebration. There have been some extensions to the Manor House since it was finally ready to occupy in 1947 and the maze still survives.


First we have some pictures of Mr. Padley's garage, 2 of the frontage and 1 of the rear -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191426-767021098.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191419-766902342.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191427-767021589.jpeg)

Now we have some pictures of the Manor House -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191435-76704517.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191446-767082324.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191440-767062102.jpeg)

An aerial view which shows the maze -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191434-767041804.jpeg)

And finally a night view -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/76/4209-270419191441-767061822.jpeg)

For those of you interested in the details, the Manor House is a 'bashed' Metcalfe Manor House Farm. The maze was constructed by cutting strips of household scourers, with a bit of scatter err .. 'scattered'. The fountain is also a Metcalfe kit. The lights in the gate posts are fibre optic cable fed by a bulb underneath the board.

There is a bit more history to come regarding the Manor House, but I thought that this post was getting to be a bit long!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on April 27, 2019, 08:39:35 PM
Excellent post David.

Enjoyed the story and the photos of the manor are great.

Thank you.

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on April 28, 2019, 08:57:11 AM
Excellent post David.

Enjoyed the story and the photos of the manor are great.

Thank you.

Alec.

I cannot express these sentiments better than Alec already has, so... seconded!

Many thanks and best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on April 29, 2019, 10:59:08 PM
Excellent post David.

Enjoyed the story and the photos of the manor are great.

Thank you.

Alec.

.
Yes totally agree
regards Derek
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on May 12, 2019, 12:27:10 PM
There is not much to report on the construction side of things, as I have been scratch building a 6 lane engine shed. It has been a bit awkward, as there are hardly any 90 degree angles involved!  :'(

Anyway, we have the next instalment of the history of 'Averingcliffe', followed by some updated pictures.

Part XI
Sir Andrew Cooke has finally taken delivery of his new Austin Princess and to say he is delighted is an understatement. When thinking of buying a new car, he was toying with the idea of getting a Rolls Royce, but decided that that might have been a bit too ostentatious. The car was actually collected a couple of days ago, from the main dealer, by Herbert Padley, who, you may recall, owns the garage in the village. Herbert has been checking over the car and as he said to Sir Andrew when he handed over the car this morning, “She is a real beauty Sir”. Sir Andrew is like a child with a new toy, being in and out of the car all morning and insisting that his wife, Lady Joan, put away her needlework and accompany him on the cars first proper outing. Lady Joan was quite impressed with the comfort and smoothness of the ride.

Whilst the general maintenance of the car will be done by Mr. Padley, the cleaning will be done by the handyman/gardener at the Manor House, Sydney James. Sydney lives in a nearby village and drives over to the Manor house in his Ford Anglia twice a week normally. Sydney is quite friendly with the housekeeper/cook at the Manor House, a widow called Alice McCarthy. Her late husband, Alfred was a fireman on the S.T.E.A.M. Railway who fell from the footplate of an engine when it was derailed following a collision with some cows on the line a number of years previously. Sadly he died from his injuries a few days later. It has been known for Alice to accompany Sydney on the occasional trip in his Anglia.

Sydney is also friendly with Anthony Hancock, who lives in Railway Cuttings and they quite often go for a drink in ‘The Duchess’.

Sir Andrew and Lady Joan do host the occasional dinner party at the Manor House and the Directors and their spouses at Wakefield Dairies can regularly be seen attending various do’s at the Manor house. Once a year, usually on the last Sunday in August, Sir Andrew and Lady Joan, along with the Directors at the dairy, host a street party for the whole village. Everybody is invited and, usually, the weather is kind. Various entertainments are provided, including a clown and Punch and Judy show for the children and, in the evening, the adults are invited to the Manor House for an informal party.


Now for some pictures. The first shows Sir Andrews new Austin princess parked outside the Manor House. The Ford Anglia owned by Syd can be seen at the side, (the building that can be seen at the rear of the Manor House is the new engine shed - more details in the next episode) -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120201.jpeg)

Now we have two photo's of the Royal Mail Depot in 'full swing', followed by the exhibits outside the Museum -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120340.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120310.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120233.jpeg)

Finally, we have a photo' of the garage, showing Mr. Padley attending to a customer -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-120519120415.jpeg)

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on May 12, 2019, 12:35:26 PM
Thanks for the updates David.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on May 12, 2019, 08:40:06 PM
Excellent, David.

Many thanks.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on May 13, 2019, 06:49:21 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:. 
 Many thanks David
     regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on May 30, 2019, 08:18:52 PM
We now have the next chapter in the history of 'Averingcliffe.

Part XII
The new S.T.E.A.M. Railway maintenance facility was finally completed and as many people stated, it looked rather futuristic. The complex housed a 6 lane engine shed which was described as being “crescent shaped, with straight edges and no right angles”.  The shed had none of the usual roof vents, as a system for extracting air had been designed by Jack Allen, the Site Engineer at Wakefield Dairies. He had done this alongside his work at the dairy, although with the permission of the dairy directors as the S.T.E.A.M. Railway had agreed that, in lieu of payment, the shunter engine used by the dairy would be maintained, free of charge, by the staff at the facility.

The original brick built 2 lane engine shed was retained, along with two outside lines. A hoist over one of these lines had been removed many years previously, but it was decided that a new hoist would be erected in the not too distant future. The original shed had been built in 1899. The facility manager, Roy Grace, was an ex-engine driver, so had a lot of knowledge of the workings of steam engines. He was a strict boss with a sense of humour. Sometimes, the staff at the facility did not know whether to laugh or cry when he spoke to them! The staff at the facility included Derek Trotter, who was the Supervisor, (or Boss as he liked to think). Derek’s brother Rodney, Colin Ball, who was the unofficial ‘sweeper upper’, Aubrey Boyce, Mike Fisher, Michael Pearce and Denzil Tulser. Raquel Slater comes to the facility for a couple of hours each day to prepare a lunch for the workers. Derek Trotter is rather keen on Raquel and they have been known to have a drink together in ‘The Duchess’. The Security Officer at the site, Danny', resides at 32 Railway Cuttings, very handy for work!

When the maintenance facility was finally fully operational, Sir Andrew Cooke remarked to his wife, Lady Joan, that, even though he had been privy to the plans, he had not realised just how extensive – and bright - the site was and further added that he was glad that a condition of the planning consent was that, except in an emergency situation, work at the facility would be restricted to the hours between 8am and 8pm, Monday Friday, with work also allowed on Saturday mornings.


Now for some pictures. The first is the view on entering the facility from the main line -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154137-7792522.jpeg)

Then a couple of shots showing the old and new engine sheds -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154139-77925385.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154141-77927206.jpeg)

This photograph is taken from outside the facility, looking over the old shed towards the new shed -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154131-779241704.jpeg)

Now we have an overhead night photograph, taken by an aerial photographer -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154126-779221535.jpeg)

This photograph shows the compound at the entrance to the facility, shown Danny approaching the barrier -

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154143-77928104.jpeg)

For those interested in the technical details, the 2 lane shed is a 'Metcalfe' kit and the 6 lane shed was designed and constructed by me! I made it from 1mm Plasticard sandwiched between  printed card, various bits of 'Plastruct' and paint. I have to admit that I am quite pleased with how it turned out, mainly because of its shape. The roof lifts off in case for when a loco' refuses to start.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Newportnobby on May 30, 2019, 08:56:05 PM
Nifty detailing and  :greatpicturessign:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on May 30, 2019, 09:20:55 PM
David,

Thanks for the photographs, the back story and the modelling information. Just giving a splendid post such as this a "like" doesn't seem anywhere near enough.

Well done all round from me!


Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: crewearpley40 on May 30, 2019, 09:57:14 PM
i like the contrasting steam shed and the modern TMD facility



thank you for your photos
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on May 31, 2019, 07:47:52 AM
Great modelling David.  :greatpicturessign:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on May 31, 2019, 08:14:03 AM
Great  stuff David.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on May 31, 2019, 04:43:15 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
   All looking really superb David   :thumbsup:
     regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on July 22, 2019, 10:15:21 PM
Here is the next chapter in the story of Averingcliffe.

Part XIII

Sir Andrew was sitting in the lounge in the Manor House one evening, nursing a glass of his favourite malt, Jurra, when he remarked to Lady Joan how the modern diesel engines did not seem to have the character of the old steam engines which had been withdrawn a decade or so earlier. Lady Joan replied that her husband spent enough time leaning on the fence watching the comings and goings at the maintenance facility, he might as well work there. Sir Andrew had an idea – could steam trains be returned? He discussed his idea with Lady Joan and as she said, “You only spend a few days a month in the City, you have plenty of free time”.

Over the course of the next few days, Sir Andrew made a few telephone calls to his friends and colleagues, including some titled and monied people. A meeting was arranged to be held in a private room at ‘The Duchess’ public house a few weeks later, with Sir Andrew being nominated as the Chairman.

At this meeting, all the people present agreed that something on the lines of a heritage railway would be a great attraction for the area and could, eventually, be turned into a profitable business. Of the prominent people at the meeting, there were two Americans, a Thomas Hanks who did a bit of acting and a Warren Buffett, a business magnate who was a shareholder of the American railway company ‘Burlington Northern and Santa Fe' (BNSF). There were also two men who had made their money from music – Philip Collins, who liked to play drums and sing and Richard Starkey, who also was a sometime drummer. There was also an Italian gentleman, Riccardo Patrese, who liked to drive fast cars. These five gentlemen all had their own model railway layouts and earned the nickname ‘The Famous Five’. Also present were four prominent business associates of Sir Andrew. After a lot of discussion about how the enterprise would be set up and run and, more importantly, financed, it was agreed that all the ten people mentioned would set up a limited company to run the new venture. Also present at the meeting were the maintenance facility Manager Roy Grace, who, being an ex-engine driver, was extremely keen on the idea, along with the local Member of Parliament Theresa Corbyn and the local council chairman, Ernest Marples. Mr. Marples, after some heated exchanges, was eventually persuaded to give his backing to the idea, as very little change would be needed at the site and no Council funds would be required. Also present was Ian Wakefield, as representative of Wakefield Dairies, who were keen on the idea of a Heritage Railway.

A few weeks after this meeting, Warren Buffet contacted Sir Andrew and informed him that a Burlington Northern locomotive, in a special livery, would be touring various heritage railway sites in the U.K. during the following month and could Sir Andrew get things moving enough for the locomotive to appear at the maintenance facility. Sir Andrew certainly got things moving! In the space of four weeks, he had secured the co-operation of both the council and Roy Grace and his staff. He had also arranged for advance publicity, the appearance of three other locomotives, insurance, press coverage and tickets for the event.


Here is a picture of the locomotive, in its special livery, sitting on the turntable at the maintenance facility. A fuller report will follow later.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/79/4209-220719121547.jpeg)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on July 23, 2019, 07:00:49 AM
Excellent looking loco.  :thumbsup:

Love the main characters!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on July 23, 2019, 10:26:50 PM
 :hellosign: Excellent story & superb photo,  :thumbsup: looking forward to more
       regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 01, 2019, 01:03:23 PM
Following on from my post regarding the 'BN Bicentennial' purchase  (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=19985.msg580088#msg580088 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=19985.msg580088#msg580088)) here is the next instalment

PART XIV   

   
The open day turned out to be a huge success, much better than anyone could have hoped for. A number of prominent local people, including the Directors of Wakefield Dairies and Stanley Hamilton, the Royal Mail depot manager and his family were invited. Sir Andrew had heard that a much larger number of people were likely to arrive than had been anticipated. Sir Andrew spoke to the local farmer, Angus McDonald, who was getting on in years and it was agreed that Angus would allow a field he owned at the foot of ‘the mountain’ to be used as a car park. The weather had been fine and dry for the previous few weeks, so the ground was hard. Sir Andrew arranged with a local bus operator, a Mr. Wallace Arnold, to provide a coach which would ferry people from the improvised car park to the maintenance depot and back again. Mr. Arnold remarked that they could call it a ‘park and ride’ service.

Everybody was primed as to their duties on the day. Derek Trotter, the depot foreman, along with his brother Rodney and the rest of the depot staff would be on hand to take visitors around the facility and explain what exactly happened there. Roy Grace, the depot manager, was in overall charge. Alice McCarthy, the housekeeper/cook at the Manor House and Raquel Slater, who ran the canteen at the depot, along with a girl from the village, would provide tea, coffee and light refreshments for the visitors, at a modest charge. Mr. Arkwright initially thought that it would be very inconvenient if there were to be a lot of people about as his regular customers would have difficulty getting to him. However, when he thought about it a bit more, a rare smile was seen.

With the agreement of the railway company, visitors to the depot could avail of a ride in an old six wheel carriage, pulled by the depot shunter, along a short stretch of line from the depot to the nearby station.

Apart from the ‘Burlington Northern’ special locomotive, 46236 ‘City Of Bradford’ in her splendid black livery, had been lent for the occasion on one of her last public displays before being scrapped. Rodney Trotter, who was a bit of a ‘plonker’ when it came to steam engines, (and was therefore, on very friendly terms with Roy Grace, who had been a steam engine driver in his earlier days, although Roy maintained a strict boss/worker relationship whilst at work), explained to the visitors how the engine was designed by William Stanier and was what was called a 4-6-2.  Also present representing the steam era was a 2-6-2 GWR locomotive 8108, which was alleged to have been scrapped in December 1960, yet here it was at the depot a few years later, albeit in a non-working condition. There was also a 0-6-0 locomotive, which had earned the nickname ‘Cauliflower’. Representing the diesel locomotives was a Class 33 33046 in what was called ‘Dutch’ livery. A number of freight vehicles were brought to the site, including the three ‘Wakefield Dairies’ milk tankers. Jack Allen, the engineer at the dairies, was on hand to explain how milk was taken from and added to the tankers.

Due to the volume of people attending the event, Stanley Hamilton, the manager at the Royal Mail depot, after a quick telephone call to the Area manager, Frank Barrens, suggested to Sir Andrew that word be put out that some of the visitors may like a conducted tour of the nearby Royal Mail facilities. This was availed of by many of the visitors.

It was a very auspicious start to the venture. Warren Buffett was the only one of the original backers who was able to attend, (Sir Andrew remarked to Lady Joan, with a twinkle in his eye, that he was only there to keep an eye on his newly liveried locomotive). A favourable report would be sent to the other backers once all the income and expenses had been worked out.

Later that evening, when the last of the visitors had been persuaded to go home, Sir Andrew and Lady Joan invited everybody back to the Manor House for drinks and a bite to eat – Mrs. McCarthy and Raquel Slater had more work to do, although they did receive a generous bonus for their efforts.

Following a number of telephone calls later the following week, it was agreed that a Heritage Railway would become a reality.


Here are a few pictures taken on the day -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-010819123853-8011673.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-010819123855-80116394.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-010819123859-801182079.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-010819123903-80118589.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-010819123903-801192218.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-010819123909-801211625.jpeg)
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-010819123911-801221559.jpeg)

I am sorry there are so many many photographs, but it was such a lovely day, in every respect, that scores of photo's were taken - I have chosen some of the more representative ones.


Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Bealman on August 01, 2019, 01:09:48 PM
Cool  :thumbsup:

Third pic down reminds me of home, for some reason.  :confused1:

Anyway, my addled brain aside, cool pics.  :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on August 01, 2019, 01:57:49 PM
Open Day was obviously a great success. I've really enjoyed reading through this post David.

Thanks also for the photos. I really must try to paint a few more figures from my little bag of naked people.

Excellent!

Alec.

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 01, 2019, 02:40:07 PM
Just between you and me Alec, those people were bought already painted.  :zippedmouth: One of these days. I will have a go at painting some people - but they are small!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on August 01, 2019, 03:08:31 PM
Just between you and me Alec, those people were bought already painted.  :zippedmouth: One of these days. I will have a go at painting some people - but they are small!

I don't know what it is, but I just can't bring myself to shell out £10 or £11 for half a dozen painted figures. I did receive two packs of the Gaugemaster ones last Christmas as gifts and in fairness they are quite splendidly detailed. The alternative seems to be a bag of about a hundred naked Chinese ones for tuppence ha'ppeny, but they look crude in comparison.

I bought a packet of two dozen better formed ones for about £3 and managed to paint one chappy reasonably well but it took ages and I got bored doing it! Maybe one of the forum members has a stash of unwanted painted people!  :-\

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 01, 2019, 03:18:04 PM
Ah ..... I am in agreement with you there Alec. Unless it is something specific that I want to look good, (like train crew), I go for the cheap ones. Most of the ones in the last lot of photo's came from a little bag that contains, at a guess, about 100 little people. If I remember correctly, they came in a job lot of bits and pieces I bought for a fiver on ebay.  Well I am a Yorkshire man but I have no idea why people think we are tight with money.  :no: ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on August 01, 2019, 08:47:57 PM
Super-duper posts; thank you, David.

Mr Buffet is a splendid chap.  Berkshire Hathaway simply turned up and bought BNSF.  Mr Buffet said it was a bet on the future of America.  I wonder if he'll arrange to buy CSX or NS and create a US 'Transcon' railroad/railway.  By the way, I think his home layout is Lionel - great fun.

Anyway; thanks again for your posts.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on August 02, 2019, 07:17:21 AM
 :greatpicturessign: David. Good storyline too, with very realistic characters.  ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on August 02, 2019, 07:26:05 PM
 :hellosign:   :greatpicturessign:
   Thanks again David really enjoying the super story, very clever characters.
         regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: railsquid on August 03, 2019, 01:12:22 AM
Somehow I seem to have missed this excellent thread  :thumbsup:

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/77/4209-300519154141-77927206.jpeg)

Is that an EF64-0 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JNR_Class_EF64) series lurking in that thar shed?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Bealman on August 03, 2019, 02:39:18 AM
Looks Japanese to me!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 03, 2019, 11:32:47 AM
@railsquid (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=3832) @Bealman (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=255)
You are not wrong. I have it listed on my stock sheet as an EF64 by Tomix, ref 2108. Do either of you gentlemen know when it was released? (Thanks for the link Squiddy).
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: chorleysteve on August 03, 2019, 11:59:59 AM
 :hellosign:

just caught up with this terrific thread; great story-telling, and great modelling
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Bealman on August 03, 2019, 12:20:05 PM
Squiddy will sort it!  :thumbsup: :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: railsquid on August 03, 2019, 12:48:21 PM
@railsquid (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=3832) @Bealman (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=255)
You are not wrong. I have it listed on my stock sheet as an EF64 by Tomix, ref 2108. Do either of you gentlemen know when it was released? (Thanks for the link Squiddy).

2108 is indeed a Tomix E64-0 series, one of their "classics". I'm not sure exactly when these were released, most likely in the 1980s; it is certainly listed in my 1991 Tomix catalogue. This will most likely have the "classic" Tomix "springworm" drive, if you pop one of the end bogies off (they're designed for that, though at your own risk please) you'll see a spring in place of the traditional worm gear.

If you still have the original box, the address and telephone number will be shown on the underside and may narrow down the approximate era when this one was produced. If the postal code (the series of numbers next to what looks like a T with an extra bar on top, i.e. 〒) has 3 or 5 digits, it was produced in 1997 or earlier, because that was when the postal code system changed to 7 digits. If the telephone number has 9 digits (format "03 (123) 4567") it will be from 1991 or earlier, as that's when an extra digit was added.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 03, 2019, 01:29:51 PM
@railsquid (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=3832)
What a font of knowledge you are.  :thankyousign: The 〒 is followed by 124-71 but the telephone number is shown as 03(3693)1031, (10 digits not 9).  So, if I am understanding you correctly, my model is 1991 or earlier?.  ???

The box includes the full sprue of 'EF' numbers which obviously fit on the sides of the loco'. It also includes a sprue of 8 smaller bits which look to fit underneath the 'EF' bits - without getting the magnifying glass out, can you tell me what these signify please?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: railsquid on August 03, 2019, 01:52:16 PM
@railsquid (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=3832)
What a font of knowledge you are.  :thankyousign: The 〒 is followed by 124-71 but the telephone number is shown as 03(3693)1031, (10 digits not 9).  So, if I am understanding you correctly, my model is 1991 or earlier?.  ???

Ah, other way round, the 10-digit telephone number is 1991 and later, so as the postal code is pre-1997 that puts the approximate production date somewhere between those two years.

The box includes the full sprue of 'EF' numbers which obviously fit on the sides of the loco'. It also includes a sprue of 8 smaller bits which look to fit underneath the 'EF' bits - without getting the magnifying glass out, can you tell me what these signify please?

The smaller parts are the manufacturers' plates, which are fitted beneath the numbers on the sides.

If you remove the polystyrene insert, there should be an instruction sheet (or more likely with earlier models the instructions printed directly onto the cardboard insert) matching number to manufacturer (JNR locomotives tended to be built to a design supplied by JNR and farmed out among multiple manufacturers). If you really care that much, as they really are hard to make out from normal viewing distances.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 03, 2019, 02:20:26 PM
@railsquid (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=3832)
The  details are printed directly onto the cardboard insert. I have said it before and will no doubt say it again - the amount of knowledge available from members of the forum, in matters not directly connected to n gauge, is amazing.  :beers: and  :thankyousign:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: railsquid on August 03, 2019, 02:45:29 PM
I actually didn't know when exactly the phone numbers changed until I looked it up, I knew it must have been before I first came to Japan in the mid-1990s and I was only aware of their existence because you still see them around printed on old shop signs etc.

Anyway glad the obscure knowledge cluttering up the inside of my head is of use to someone  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 16, 2019, 09:45:59 PM
Inspired by the success of Leon, I have created a Google Photo folder of some of the pictures showing the development of Averingcliffe.

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipN1Hmnu8Vhs8ZkI6dtNNQo8qwEgRLeSuOC1Nan168RUE2Mu2Sts0U2gNDlZafVg3w?key=Qi1RclhoTXh5QlVZQVdPVmQxbzY0RzBSQU5sQU5R
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on August 16, 2019, 09:51:37 PM
Excellent.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: weave on August 16, 2019, 11:44:47 PM
Hi David,

Great stuff although I hate it when people have lights on their layout because it looks so good and I haven't got any and I want some but don't know how to do it and I've probably left it too late now to install them without destroying things already stuck down and even the toys I'm throwing out of my pram at the moment aren't lit up  :'(  ;)  :D.

Seriously, great stuff.

Cheers weave  :beers:

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Leon on August 17, 2019, 01:31:47 AM
I have created a Google Photo folder of some of the pictures showing the development of Averingcliffe.

David, I like it! I hope I can emulate the clarity of your images, eventually. Putting parts (pictures) together makes a lot of sense and helps with the visualization of the entire project. I suspect you've used Google Photos before. I have dozens of albums there and need to create a few more, including one to show the progression of my layout from baseboard to the final (?) finished product. Photo albums are a much more manageable way to pass on photographs than the shoe box my mother left me (though less emotional). As with my family tree, if my children aren't interested it doesn't matter. I've had the pleasure of creating them and learned a lot along the way!

Leon
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 17, 2019, 08:54:51 AM
@weave (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=735) If I had realised the profound effect some of my pictures would have on you, I would not have included them. I can only apologise and hope that you soon get over your upset  :). Seriously though, whilst it would be difficult to retrofit lights in buildings and the like, it might be easier to fit street or yard lights. Depending what is under the baseboard, a hole drilled through and a lamppost glued in place might be easy enough. If you used 12v lights, they could be connected to a simple battery.

@Leon (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=6724) Whilst I had heard of Google Photos, I had never used it until yesterday when I looked at your album.  :thankyousign: A good idea to keep photographs in one place where others can see them. I agree with your comments about a shoe box full of old photographs. I have a lot of old photo's scanned into the computer - another album?
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on August 17, 2019, 09:05:09 AM
Excellent idea, David.

I really enjoyed looking through your album; thank you.

I just wish that I could take photographs as well as you (not to mention modelling to your high standard).

Inspirational stuff.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 17, 2019, 05:58:27 PM
@Train Waiting (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=6222)  Okay John, I can take credit for the modelling, (although I have picked up plenty of tips on this 'ere forum  ;)), but the photographs are mainly down to the camera. I have a Canon 720 and usually just have it on 'Auto', although following yet more tips from the forum, I am starting to experiment with Aperture Priority.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on August 18, 2019, 10:07:00 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
  Many thanks David, all looking superb.   
     regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 23, 2019, 03:28:10 PM
It seems a while since I updated the thread, mainly because the farmhouse was scratch built and the barn was a kit that I altered, but here goes -

We now come to the next chapter, which mainly concerns the Farm –

PART XV

Angus McDonald, (his Great Grandfather originally came from Scotland), now owns the farm. He has always been known as ‘Young McDonald’ as his Father, Finlay, was always known as ‘Old McDonald’ for some reason. The current farmhouse was built by Fraser McDonald, the Grandfather of  Angus,  in the early 1900’s and subsequently extended.

Fraser McDonald, at one time, owned hundreds of acres in the area and the main crops were wheat and barley. Most of the farmland was on the other side of ‘the mountain’. He also had a number of beef cattle although, strangely enough, given the fact that ‘Wakefield Dairies’ were not that far away, he never went in for dairy farming.  Daniel and Edward Wakefield offered to help set him up with a dairy herd and the requisite equipment, but Fraser could never be persuaded. Between the two World Wars a lot of the land on the other side of ‘the mountain’ was sold, the majority of it being for houses.

Angus McDonald sold a small parcel of land, adjoining the Manor House on the other side of the two main rail lines, to facilitate the building of the new railway maintenance depot. Angus, who lives with his wife Mary, now just owns the land between the main rail lines and the harbour, along with three fields on the other side of ‘the mountain’. These three fields are used only to grow fodder, although, following the success of the recent open day at the S.T.E.A.M. railway, it had already been agreed between Angus and Sir Andrew Cooke that one of the fields would be used for parking, when the heritage railway was fully under way, (for a suitable remuneration!).

In the 1920’s, Finlay McDonald bought a few Highland Cattle from another farmer who had decided to retire, as both his sons had been killed in what was called ‘The Great War’. Finlay looked after his animals and within a decade, the quality of the beef from his cattle was known far and wide. One day, Finlay was visited by Sir Donald Cooke,  who had a proposition. Following a few meetings, Finlay had one of his cattle taken to a local abattoir and the meat was whisked off to London by the first available train. A few weeks later, Finlay was visited by a lawyer from London, who had in his possession a contract to supply two Highland Cattle per month to an abattoir in London. Finlay immediately contacted Sir Donald and a meeting was arranged in a private room at ‘The Duchess’ public house that very evening. Following the meeting, it was agreed  that Finlay would sign the contract and the Solicitor agreed that the contract would become effective in 60 days time. A private spur line would be constructed from the goods line that served the harbour, with the help of Sir Donald, who would take a small percentage of any profits. The Solicitor had been acting on behalf of the Directors of Fortnum, Mason and Harrod, a rather exclusive store in London that catered for the wealthy and titled. It was said that no matter how much something cost, if a customer was prepared to pay, anything could be provided.

Angus now concentrates on the Highland Cattle and receives a healthy cheque every quarter. He also has a few sheep and pigs which, when necessary, are sent to the local abattoir. There is also a small field in which strawberries are grown and Mary McDonald sells them to the local residents and occasionally she has a small stall at the roadside. She makes jam with some of the fruit which she gives to some of the people in the village, much to the chagrin of Mr. Arkwright, the local shopkeeper. Mary has been heard to say, on more than one occasion, "I am going to have Strawberry Fields Forever".

The farm is run just by Angus and Mary, although Sydney James, the handyman/gardener and sometimes chauffeur at the Manor House, does help out a couple of times a week.


Here are a few photographs showing the farm and these, along with some others, have been added to my album on Google https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipN1Hmnu8Vhs8ZkI6dtNNQo8qwEgRLeSuOC1Nan168RUE2Mu2Sts0U2gNDlZafVg3w?key=Qi1RclhoTXh5QlVZQVdPVmQxbzY0RzBSQU5sQU5R (https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipN1Hmnu8Vhs8ZkI6dtNNQo8qwEgRLeSuOC1Nan168RUE2Mu2Sts0U2gNDlZafVg3w?key=Qi1RclhoTXh5QlVZQVdPVmQxbzY0RzBSQU5sQU5R)

This first picture shows most of the farm and how it lies in relation to the maintenance depot on the left and the harbour on the right -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-230819135236.jpeg)

This second picture shows Angus moving a bale of hay passing the strawberry fields -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-230819135201.jpeg)

This picture shows the barn, with bales of hay outside that are waiting to be taken under cover -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-230819135122.jpeg)

This picture shows the prized Highland Cattle -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-230819135050.jpeg)

And finally we have another view of the layout of the farm -
(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/80/4209-230819134931.jpeg)

This link takes you to my thread on constructing the farmhouse -
https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=46039.msg581413#msg581413 (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=46039.msg581413#msg581413) )
The barn in the farmyard is a ‘Scale Model Scenery’ kit https://www.scalemodelscenery.co.uk/laser-cut-open-sided-barn-n2mm1148-437-p.asp (https://www.scalemodelscenery.co.uk/laser-cut-open-sided-barn-n2mm1148-437-p.asp) that I have altered a bit by adding walls and reducing the size of the base. The walls are made of ‘Vollmer’ embossed card glued back to back, topped off with grey painted 1.5mm x 2mm plastic strip.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on August 23, 2019, 05:47:44 PM
 :greatpicturessign: and excellent modelling David.  :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on August 23, 2019, 06:40:39 PM
:greatpicturessign: and excellent modelling David.  :beers:

Seconded!

And very fine Hielan' coos.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on August 23, 2019, 07:05:30 PM
Great story and lovely pictures David.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Invicta Alec on August 24, 2019, 05:02:40 PM
Fab photos, great modelling.

Alec.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on August 25, 2019, 08:15:48 PM
 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
 Superb story David, really like the farmyard, all looking excellent.  :thumbsup:  :thumbsup:
    regards Derek
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Phoenix on August 26, 2019, 01:41:44 PM
Hi David,

Sorry I've been out of touch for a bit, hope you're enjoying the Bank Holiday

I'm loving the pics you have been putting up. the modelling is excellent, and the detailing round the farm is great.

Also loving the Manor House. I'm not a great fan of card kits, what you have done however is fab. Adding the ivy and other details really makes it look good, and the maze in the grounds is a great touch. I'm glad Averingcliffe is nowhere near Windmill Hill, as the patrons of my pub would spend days wandering round and round in there while trying to find their way home  :D

All best wishes

Kevin

 :beers:

PS, Will send you a PM about Mr Padley's Garage in a bit  ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 26, 2019, 02:22:24 PM
@Phoenix (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=5755) Hi Kevin, many thanks for those comments, which, coming from the man who has created Windmill Hill, is really appreciated.  The Manor House is as you say, a card kit, being the 'Manor House Farm' house from Metcalfe. I extended it a bit and added another bit that came with the kit. - my first full 'kit bash'.  The patrons of the pub on Windmill Hill are welcome for a tour round my village, finishing off with a pint or two in 'The Duchess'?  :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: grumbeast on August 27, 2019, 04:00:36 PM
Great pics!

  The barn in particular looks fantastic I can almost erm smell it :)

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 29, 2019, 01:46:56 PM
Please find attached a copy of a notice which is, as we speak, being circulated to all residents of 'Averingcliffe' and widely throughout the surrounding area. The notice will also appear in tomorrows edition of the local paper. I urge all local residents to read the notice, as it concerns the future of 'Averingcliffe' and the surrounding area.

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on August 29, 2019, 02:02:20 PM
I’ve a feeling that the public meeting will be particularly well attended.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 29, 2019, 02:43:03 PM
It is to be hoped so. Sir Daniel has arranged to buy quite a large quantity of beer and wine from Mike, the landlord of the 'Duchess' and has also authorised Alice McCarthy, the cook/housekeeper to buy the necessary provisions to feed, as Mrs. McCarthy put it, "the five thousand"!  :)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on August 29, 2019, 03:14:45 PM
It is to be hoped so. Sir Daniel has arranged to buy quite a large quantity of beer and wine from Mike, the landlord of the 'Duchess' and has also authorised Alice McCarthy, the cook/housekeeper to buy the necessary provisions to feed, as Mrs. McCarthy put it, "the five thousand"!  :)
I shall consult the relevant timetables to see if I can catch a train from Trepol Bay.
Beer, wine and food sounds tempting  :beers:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on August 29, 2019, 03:35:48 PM
You would be more than welcome. Having just liaised with Sir Andrew, he agrees wholeheartedly with me, saying that it would be interesting to get an 'outsiders' view. However, he does have one caveat. It would be appreciated if you did not make your intentions widely known. As Sir Andrew puts it, "The Manor House is nowhere as big as the old one".  ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on August 29, 2019, 07:33:02 PM

Beer, wine and food sounds tempting  :beers:

Beer before wine; fine:
Wine before beer; oh dear!
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on September 02, 2019, 12:32:14 PM
This chapter is a bit long winded, but it is important, being an almost verbatim account of the meeting that formed the committee.

Chapter XVI

Details re Public Meeting held on 6th September

The meeting was held in the Dining Room at The Manor house as, due to the fact that the great table had been taken away for a minor repair and French Polishing, this was the largest space, apart from the garden, available to hold the meeting.

A long table had been placed at one end of the room, with Sir Andrew Cooke and a number other people sat there. At precisely 7.30 pm, Sir Andrew rose and said, “I would like to thank you all for attending this meeting tonight. I thought that twenty chairs would be more than adequate, but, with apologies, as a large number of you have noticed, a lot of you have to stand. However, I will be as brief as I can so you can all get out into the garden and enjoy the refreshments on this lovely evening. The main point of this meeting is to form a committee who will have two main aims - to manage the not inconsiderable monies that have been accumulated since the opening of the S.T.E.A.M. Heritage Railway and Royal Mail museum. The monies are currently held in an account at the National Midland Bank in Upper Broadford, suitably supervised by Mr. George Mainwaring, the Manager, whom a lot of you will know.” Sir Andrew indicated the man seated on his left, who promptly rose and gave a slight bow. Sir Andrew then drank from a glass of water in front of him on the table and went on to say “The second aim of the committee will be to ensure that the success of the attractions so far enjoyed by us all will continue”.

Sir Andrew then said, “First of all, we need the committee – do we have any nominations for the position of Chairman?” Somebody seated in the middle of the room said, “You do it”. Sir Andrew smiled and said, “Whilst we do not have any formal rules as yet, I suggest that names for the Chairman, Vice Chairman, Treasurer and Secretary be put forward, does anyone have any objections to that?” Anthony Hancock, who lived in Railway Cuttings then said from his seat near the front, “The sun goes down in a couple of hours, can we get on with it?” This brought a few laughs from some of the attendees, whilst one or two others were heard to say, “Don’t be a misery guts” and other similar entreaties. Sir Andrew himself smiled and then said, “I would be honoured to serve as the Chairman. As most of you are aware, I do have some influence in the area and wider afield so feel I could serve the committee well.  As for the position of Vice Chairman, I would like to ask Mr. Michael Wakefield, who as you know, is a Director at Wakefield Dairies, to accept the position”. Sir Andrew then turned to his left and addressed the man sat beside Mr. Mainwaring, “Michael”.

Michael Wakefield stood and said, “Like Sir Andrew, I too would be honoured to serve on the committee. We have had some discussions at the dairy and will have some exciting news to impart to the committee in the not too distant future, which I am sure, will be of great benefit to residents and visitors to Averingcliffe”. “Thank you Michael” said Sir Andrew. “To save time, I would like to propose that Mr. Mainwaring accept the position of Treasurer, seeing as how he already has our money”. This brought quite a few laughs and smiles from the people in the room. Mr. Mainwaring stood and said, “As you say Sir Andrew, I already have the money, we might as well make it official”.   "Now as to the Secretary, I wonder if you Sarah”, who was sat on Sir Andrews right, “would accept the position. I know of the work you do at the dairy and, as Michaels wife, I feel that you would be more than capable of doing the job”. Sarah Wakefield stood and, blushing, said that she would accept the job.

Sir Andrew then said, "Now, as we have representatives of the Royal Mail and local Council present and sat at the table, I would like to ask if you Stanley, as the Royal Mail representative and you, Claude, as the Council representative, would like to serve on the committee – Stanley?” Stanley Hamilton stood and said, “Well, yes, yes I could do that. Thank you”. As Stanley sat down, Sir Andrew looked at Claude and said, “Claude, how about you?”. Claude Greengrass stood and said, “Whilst obviously I could not unduly influence any decisions the Council may make in relation to what the Committee may decide, I do feel that I could be a valuable member of the committee, so yes, I would like to accept”. He then sat down.

“Right”, said Sir Andrew, “we now need just a few more members. I would like to suggest that some residents of Averingcliffe and the surrounding area put themselves forward – any volunteers?” There were a few murmurings from the people present. “Oh come on people, surely some of you would like to represent your community, how about you Nora”. He indicated a lady sat to the left of the room. “You do not stand on ceremony and, if you do not mind me saying, are known as being down to earth and to the point, just the type of person we need”. Nora Batty replied, “Nay lad, I now knowt about committees, I’ve never bin on one before”. Sir Andrew then said, with a smile on his face, “Nora, as I said, your directness would be a help to the committee. You have lived in Broadford for over forty years, so you know the area and the people. Please consider it”. “Well lad, I suppose I could, but me legs aren’t what they used to be you know”. “Nora, once we get the committee established, the meetings would probably be only about one a month and I am sure we could arrange transport for you” replied Sir Andrew. Nora replied, “Oh go on then, it might be fun”. Sir Andrew told her that he appreciated her agreement and then said, “We need another member. With respect to the majority of you, how about somebody from the younger generation”. Again, there were murmurs from the attendees, but nobody seemed to be forthcoming. Stanley Hamilton whispered something to Sir Andrew who said, “Excellent suggestion”. He then looked at Michael Sagar, who was stood at the right hand side of the room with his wife, Sue. “Michael, would you consider sitting on the committee”. Sue nudged Michaels arm and said something to him. “Err, well, I could do I suppose” replied Michael. “Excellent” came the reply from Sir Andrew.

“Before I draw this meeting to a close, I would like to suggest that we have one further member on the committee. The South Tentdale, Exdale And Marple Railway have been mainly responsible for the burgeoning fortunes of the area and I am sure that  everyone here, including Mr. Arkwright would be in full agreement with me there”. This brought howls of laughter from the people present. Even Mr. Arkwright, sat at the back of the room, was seen to smile. When the laughter had died down, Sir Andrew continued, “I therefore propose that Roy Grace, the manager at the facility, join the committee. Sir Andrew turned to his left and addressed the man at the far end of the table, “How about it Roy?” Roy Grace stood and replied, “Thank you Sir Andrew, it would be a privilege to serve on the committee”.

Sir Andrew turned to the audience and said, “Would anyone else like to add anything”. A lone voice was heard to say, “Can we have the refreshments now?” This brought forward more laughter. Sir Andrew then said, “Ladies and Gentlemen, thank you for your time and patience. I am sure that the members of the committee, on your behalf, will do an excellent job in bringing even more prosperity to the area. Can I ask that the committee members stay behind for a few minutes whilst the rest of you retire to the garden and enjoy the refreshments? Once the committee members were on their own, Sir Andrew said to them, “Firstly, may I thank you wholeheartedly for agreeing to form the new committee. I am sure that, between us, we can make a very successful job of looking after the amenities in Averingcliffe and go from strength to strength. I have an idea for the committee name, what do you all feel about Averingcliffe and Surrounds Development Area. All agreed that A.S.D.A. had a certain ring to it.


Sorry that you could not make it @port perran (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230)  ;)

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on September 02, 2019, 05:18:03 PM
Sorry, did someone say free wine and food? :thumbsup:

Am I too late?  :confused2:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on September 02, 2019, 06:05:06 PM
Well it was available, but unfortunately there was not even enough left for Sir Andrew and Lady Joan's supper! 
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on September 02, 2019, 06:19:44 PM
Well it was available, but unfortunately there was not even enough left for Sir Andrew and Lady Joan's supper!

I missed out too  :'(
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on September 02, 2019, 06:37:55 PM
I am sorry that some people missed the inaugural meeting of A.S.D.A., but I can say that there are some exciting developments to come which will transform Averingcliffe and the surrounding area. I am not at liberty to disclose any details at this stage, as there are a number of meetings to come, involving the Council, Bank and the local business community. As soon as I can, I will reveal those details.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: port perran on September 02, 2019, 06:46:51 PM
Exciting stuff
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on September 10, 2019, 11:49:22 AM
We now have a rough transcript of the first official A.S.D.A. committee meeting. It is another rather long winded report, but, hopefully, the next chapter will not be as long and will include some photographs of building work.

CHAPTER XVII

The first official meeting of the A.S.D.A. committee was held on the following Thursday evening in a private room at ‘The Duchess’. I will not bore you with the opening formal comments and discussions, but it was agreed that, should a committee member have a suggestion, it would be put to a vote and if at least five members agreed, that suggestion would be acted upon.

Sir Andrew then said, “An account has now been opened at the National Midland Bank. In theory, anyone can put money into the account, but for a withdrawal, the signatures of two committee members will be required, one of which must be that of Mr. Mainwaring or myself”. Everybody agreed to this. Continuing, Sir Andrew said, “Now I can report that over the last week, a lot of discussions have been taking place and, rather than steal anybodys thunder, I would like to ask various members of the committee to give you the details. Can I start with you Michael?”

Michael Wakefield stood up and said, “Thank you Sir Andrew. What I can say to start with, is that the directors of Wakefield Dairies have agreed to create a museum at the dairy. A part of the ground floor of the main building has been set aside for this purpose and we have already started work on this. We hope it will be another fine attraction to the area”.

“Excuse me Mr. Wakefield,” interrupted Nora Batty, “but the dairy is a bit of a trek from the other end of the village. My legs are not what they used to be you know and a lot of people are in the same boat”.

Michael Wakefield replied, “That is an excellent point to raise Nora. The directors have thought about this and, once the museum is up and running, which should only take a matter of weeks, we have arranged with Mr. Wallace Arnold to provide a bus service from one end of Averingcliffe to the other, so visitors do not have to walk if they would rather ride, just like he did on the occasion of the S.T.E.A.M. Railway opening day. However, we are currently in discussions with the Council, Mr. Greengrass will fill you in shortly, about starting a tram service from one end of the village to the other. We are prepared to purchase a tram, with the possibility of acquiring a second one, if A.S.D.A. paid the running costs.”  There were a few murmurs from the people present and then Sir Andrew said, “I think at this point, we should hear from Mr. Greengrass”.

Claude Greengrass stood and said, “Ladies and Gentlemen, I can say that the Council, using some of the local amenities fund and general improvements money, are prepared to fund the laying of a tram track alongside the main road through the village. An application has been made to the relevant people for a grant that will allow the council to create a paved area at either end of the station which, as I am sure you will all agree, is a bit of an eyesore at the moment. I am confident that the grant will be forthcoming”. Claude then sat down.

Sir Andrew then stood and said to the members, “I am sure you will all agree that the information provided by Mr. Greengrass is highly encouraging”. There was general agreement amongst the committee members. Michael Sagar stood and said, “I can not agree more, but I am a bit troubled by any possible noise issues, what with trams running all day and what could be a large influx of visitors”. Michael Wakefield stood and replied, “I hear what you are saying Michael. The trams are electrically operated and so are almost silent in operation. As regards the visitor influx, I believe Sir Andrew can comment on that”. Michael Wakefield sat down as Sir Andrew rose. “Indeed I can Michael. Sir Bob Peel, the Chief Constable, was at the Manor House for a few drinks last weekend, along with his wife Emma. I have asked Sir Peel, that, in the interests of public safety and order, if we could have a constable permanently stationed in the village. Whilst Sir Peel could not agree to this, due to budgetary constraints, he has agreed that an officer will be in the area, whenever possible, whilst the attractions are open to the public. I do not think we can ask for more”. “That’s fair enough” replied Michael Sagar.

Sir Andrew then said, “Now for a final piece of good news. Along with Michael Wakefield, I have been in negotiation with a firm of builders. For the trams to be protected from the elements and serviced when necessary, we need some sort of building. The builders, Taylor, Woodrow and Wimpey, are prepared to build a tram shed and shops at either end of the tramway. They are already contracted to build a shopping centre in Broadford for the Council and this will be a sort of ‘job on the side’. They obviously will want paying for the work, but I have got them to agree to taking much less than they would normally charge, in exchange for a percentage of the rents from the shops”. Nora Batty then said, “Who will own the shops though and who will occupy them?” “The shops will be owned by us and hopefully, there will be no shortage of businesses wanting to locate here” replied Sir Andrew. Stanley Hamilton then asked “How exactly will that work Sir Andrew?” to which Sir Andrew replied, “Ah, what I have not yet said, is that A.S.D.A. is to receive charity status. It means a lot of paperwork and red tape, but that can be sorted out. Can I ask George to explain a bit more?”

George Mainwaring then stood and said, “I have spoken to my superiors at head office and, if A.S.D.A. were to become a charity, they can provide a loan on extremely favourable terms. With this loan, we can pay the builders for the work and the rents from the shops, apart from the proportion given to the builders, will come to A.S.D.A. Along with monies received from the railway, Post Office and dairy, we should be able to maintain a reasonably healthy position.”

Sir Andrew then said, “Stanley, what is the position of Royal Mail?” to which Stanley replied, “Well I have spoken to the Area Manager, Frank Barrens, who has been in contact with his bosses. They have agreed that they are happy to keep the status quo. Apparently they said “what you’re proposing” is fine and “whatever you want” is okay providing there is no interruption to the running of the depot. They are happy for any monies to go to A.S.D.A. providing it does not cost the Royal Mail anything”.

Sir Andrew then suggested that the meeting came to a close and that a further meeting be held the following week and that they should all retire to the bar.

Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: railsquid on September 10, 2019, 12:12:02 PM
Looks good  :thumbsup:

I can't see any German locos though ;)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on September 10, 2019, 12:19:12 PM

I can't see any German locos though ;)

Give it time, give it time.  :)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: Train Waiting on September 10, 2019, 08:49:11 PM
Thank you very much indeed, David, for introducing Mrs Peel into the proceedings.

I so look forward to the forthcoming photographs.

Best Wishes.

John
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on September 11, 2019, 09:32:01 PM
 :hellosign:
  Many thanks David all very clever & extremely entertaining back story, looking forward to more with pictures
       regards Derek.
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on September 11, 2019, 09:38:29 PM
@cornish yorkie (https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=4216)
 :thankyousign: Derek. Most of the people in the back story, (right back to Chapter 1), are the names of my ancestors jumbled up. As you can tell, I 'borrow' from real life, (and the television), as well.  I just hope that I don't get a solicitors letter one day!  :)

Addit: Depending on the builders, there may be some pictures this weekend. If not, it will be at least a week or so, as I, unfortunately, ( ;)), have to go over to the UK next week to visit a few model shops.  ;D
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: dannyboy on September 16, 2019, 05:25:24 PM
Just a quick update this time folks.

Due to the annual holiday period, all work has stopped in Averingcliffe. However, I am happy to report that work has been taking place at quite a fast pace and the two engine shed and shops blocks are virtually complete. The tram tracks are laid and the council have also been busy creating pedestrian areas and laying new pavements. In general, everybody is happy with the progress. I will report further after the holiday but in the meantime, here are a couple of photographs of the tram shed and shops building situated at the western end of Averingcliffe.

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/4209-160919172001.jpeg)

(https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/81/4209-160919171922.jpeg)
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: keithbythe sea on September 17, 2019, 06:55:32 AM
Looking good!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: chorleysteve on September 17, 2019, 09:38:20 AM
as Keith said.... "looking good"
Title: Re: Averingcliffe
Post by: cornish yorkie on September 17, 2019, 09:52:45 PM
 :hellosign:.  :greatpicturessign:
   Of course looking good
        regards Derek.