Is it daft to buy rolling stock nearly 20 years old?

Started by keiron99, December 03, 2023, 07:11:43 PM

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keiron99

I'm getting back into the hobby after 4 decades!

Anyway, poking around on ebay and in the used sections at dealer's websites, I see a lot of stuff I quite fancy.

One item in particular on ebay is a set of Kato coaches, boxed, and while the boxy is scruffy the coaches themselves look spot on.

Thing is, I can work out that they are possibly as old as 2004.

Would I be taking a risk? What can really go wrong? Maybe the colours have faded?

Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks.

dannyboy

I have quite a few pieces of Kato rolling stock, locomotives, wagons and carriages. From research, I know that some of the pieces are from 20+ years ago and I do not think I have had a single problem with any of them, apart from one locomotive which I bought as a non-runner. (It is still a non-runner!). If the price is reasonable, go for it.  :thumbsup:
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with them.

Train Waiting

2004 - positively young!  Barely run in.

Kato-manufactured products are absolutely fabulous and will stand the test of time with ease.

Nothing wrong with a bit of colour fading - that's what happens to 1:1 scale stock.

As ever, approach e-bay with care, though.

I am buying ProperlyPoole Graham Farish rolling stock that is 20-40 years old and having such fun refurbishing it.

If in doubt, buy rolling stock second-hand and locomotives new.  That minimises risk.

Best wishes

John
Please visit us at www.poppingham.com

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Jeff_W

Quote from: keiron99 on December 03, 2023, 07:11:43 PMI'm getting back into the hobby after 4 decades!

Anyway, poking around on ebay and in the used sections at dealer's websites, I see a lot of stuff I quite fancy.

One item in particular on ebay is a set of Kato coaches, boxed, and while the boxy is scruffy the coaches themselves look spot on.

Thing is, I can work out that they are possibly as old as 2004.

Would I be taking a risk? What can really go wrong? Maybe the colours have faded?

Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks.

I have American rolling stock by Atlas dating back to the early 90s. Looks fine to me. I'm not sure about my UK outline though, but I think I have a few that would fall into the same time frame.

Jim Easterbrook

#4
It's not easy to put an exact date on some of my second (or more) hand stock, but one railbus was only made from 1979 to 1985! It had one small bit of damage which I was able to repair but is otherwise fine. Another was made from 1969 to 1985. I like refurbishing old models.
Jim Easterbrook
"I'm an engineer, not an artist!"
"Amoro, emptio, utiliso!"
Personal website. / Photos on Flickr. / Blog.

Firstone18

I've got Graham Farish and Hornby Minitrix from the 80s, Union Mills form 2005 to last year, and many items of rolling stock from the 80s through to the early 2000s; if you like it apply Rule 1 and enjoy it!!
Finally, after waiting over 55 years I am building a permanent layout in a purpose built shed!

PLD

Age alone should not be the guiding factor in whether something is worth buying, providing it is at the right price!
Some stock of that age will be to current standards but others may have been superseded by a newer version of the same, so need to be careful not to pay the 'newer' price for the 'older' model...
If in doubt, for on-line sales, post a photo or link here and I'm sure many would be happy to advise.

Graham

Like others I have kit bought in the 80's all the way to now. it's your railway/train set, do what you like.

Gordon

It is not the age, but the standard of build and realism, that matters. I have a few items that date from the 1960s but I rarely run them because they do not look nearly as realistic as their modern equivalents. However, I also regularly run several items of stock that date from as early as 1971 because they are accurate models.

There was a layout at Warley the other weekend where I noticed the owner was running 'shorty' under scale length German coaches - these are models that date from the 1960s. I personally would not run them on my own layout as I am not happy with incorrect scale length, but that is just a personal preference - and all railway modelling is down to personal preference.
Sometime Publicity Officer, N Gauge Society

Swiss Railways Consultant
French Railways Consultant
European railway expert

First British N loco (in 1972): Farish GER Holden tank!
Modelling French N gauge since 1975
Modelling Swiss and German N gauge since 1971

Bealman

Answering the original question, it's not daft at all. Running on my layout, maroon mk1 coach, circa 1990.

Loco: repainted Peco Jubilee, 1986.

Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Roy L S

Definitely a case of "Rule 1" it is your trainset, and it is entirely your choice, in terms of British stuff, there are sure to be plenty of Farish locos going right back to the 80s with plenty of life left in them and as long as you run Code 80 track, pretty much any stock even with "pizza cutter" wheels should be fine.

The Peco Jubilee (made by Rivarossi) in the picture above is a case in point, with it's origin in the late 60s, it was for a long time by common consensus the best RTR British steam loco out there, and it wasn't until the latest generation Farish models started arriving (Ironically the first being a Jubilee) that it began to look more dated.

The most important thing is that the models you buy give you enjoyment, but as others have said, exercise a little caution purchasing from eBay, scrutinise pictures carefully, ask for more if needed, if unsure walk away - there will usually be more.

Regards

Roy

Newportnobby

It's maybe true to say more modern stock is more detailed but with very little effort/outlay older stuff can be improved. Sometimes a simple rewheeling can hugely improve old pizza cutter wheeled stock, for example

Bigmac

the only daft thing about the old stuff is if you pay the prices some rip off artists ask.
i used to be indecisive...but now i'm not so sure.

elmo

My 1980's Farish locos all still work. Some of them must have been to the moon and back. They also have far more pulling power that most modern locos. Add to this the number of modern bits that have failed. I still await a replacement motor for my Dapol class 22.

Rolling stock - bomb proof! Lost count of the trucks that have bounced off the floor and remained intact. I have seen coal truck brake gear sitting at the bottom of the box on model shop displays. I mush prefer the old stuff. If I want extra detail I can add as much as I like.

Elmo

Chris in Prague

Quote from: Firstone18 on December 03, 2023, 10:10:56 PMI've got Graham Farish and Hornby Minitrix from the 80s, Union Mills form 2005 to last year, and many items of rolling stock from the 80s through to the early 2000s; if you like it apply Rule 1 and enjoy it!!

Seconded! As have I and the locos. have all been successfully converted to DCC.

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