The Angels’ Share

Started by port perran, September 04, 2023, 04:47:25 PM

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cornish yorkie

ONLY ONE RULE ENJOY

Chris in Prague


port perran

Apologies for the delay in posting.
I'm still up country and extremely busy. Plus, of course, I had a very enjoyable evening at the football last evening.
I'm travelling home tomorrow but for now here's the latest update.
First though, a photograph :


Part Nineteen

Jimmy Johnstone was enjoying a final pint before bed.
So much had happened today that it was virtually impossible to come to any decisions so he would sleep on it. However, at the back of his mind he had a suspicion that things weren't going to be easy.
Sandy Murdoch's name suddenly sprung into his mind. Jimmy wondered if the big policeman had heard about his move South. News travelled fast around Glasgow and Sandy Murdoch always had his nose close to the ground.

Daniel Brodie, over in the Penny Farthing pub in Wadebridge was in deep conversation with Big Bert and it wasn't long at all before he had agreed to help Bert to obtain some whisky from the warehouses in Tregonning. Daniel had told Beet all about his involvement with stealing barrels of spirit in Scotland which was music to the big man's ears.

At the same time Joe, the taxi driver collecting Sandy Murdoch and his wife Doris had some important news to impart. "I'm so sorry Sir but I've been told by the manager at the Station Hotel here in Trepol Bay that they have somehow double booked and so unfortunately have no room available for you. However he has arranged for you to stay in a suite at their sister hotel The Cedars in St Agnes which is about ten miles away. It's a lovely village close to the sea and a beautiful hotel".

Sandy and Doris were tired after a long journey down from Scotland but were perfectly happy to accept the alternative accommodation.
On the journey the taxi driver was extremely chatty so Sandy took the opportunity to ask if he knew anything about Cornish whisky.
"Oh certainly I do", replied the driver, "In fact the distillery is situated just outside of St Agnes where you are staying. It's run by the Rundle family headed by Sir William and his wife Lady Annabelle. They are a charming couple but hate formality. If you bump into them which you may well do as Sir William is a regular in the bar at The Cedars you'll find him so easy to talk to and by the way they much prefer to be called Bill and Annie".

A few minutes later Sandy and Doris were booking into their hotel just as Jimmy Johnstone was making his way upstairs to his room. As Jimmy looked over his shoulder he was, to say the very least, dumfounded. In fact he couldn't believe his eyes but a second glance confirmed his worst fears.

Meanwhile up in the Crown Hotel, Silliness young PC Bob Peel was enjoying a pint at the bar. He had finished his shift some twenty minutes previously and, it being a warm day, felt he had earned his pint of fine, frothing ale.
Just as he had taken his first sip old Joe McDonald, a local farmer, sidled up to PC Peel. "Just thought you might be interested. I've been offered some cheap whisky by an acquaintance of  mine. Now you know I don't agree with anything illegal so I'm just mentioning it to you so you know. A couple of names were mentioned. I've written those names on a slip of paper but, if anyone asks, I didn't tell you".

PC Peel looked at the slip of dog eared paper. Written on it were the names Jimmy Johnstone and Dan Brodie – Glasgow.
The young PC was mystified. He knew the name Jimmy Johnstone of course. He is the well respected Celtic and Scotland footballer.
Then, a few minutes later, Sandy Murdoch came to mind. "Of course", thought the PC, "Jimmy Johnstone. Sandy mentioned a sad story about him when we were on our fishing trip".

Jimmy Johnstone, for once in his life, didn't know what to do. Of all the people in the world Sandy Murdoch was here in the same hotel.........


I'll get round to fixing it drekkly me 'ansome.

crewearpley40

It's ok. Martin we love your posts and that's a super photo

Evocative

Chris in Prague

Quote from: crewearpley40 on September 20, 2023, 05:35:38 PMIt's ok. Martin we love your posts and that's a super photo

Evocative

Seconded! Many thanks, Martin. We appreciate you finding the time even though you're very busy.

Train Waiting

#65
Very clever; very clever indeed.

SuperSpiffing picture as well.  I so love these GWR 0-4-2T engines.  And I like 'T9s' as well.

Four of the Mr Collet's 0-4-2T engines survive.  I recommend highly a visit to the Tiverton Museum of Mid-Devon Life (I hope I got that right!) to enjoy the gorgeous pedantry of its name.  The lovely ladies on duty were amazed when Mrs Poppingham and I visited a few years ago.  The idea of people from between the Forth and the Tweed being interested in mid-Devon life fascinated them.  Suffice it to say, No. 1442 was made available for our inspection.  Very detailed, in my case!

I suppose few enthusiasts bother going to see this engine, but I think it is well worth a trip to Tiverton to introduce oneself to her.  Tiverton is a nice town as well.

By the way, I noticed your double reference to Association Football which is, of course, as alien a concept to me as comparative cosmology.  But PC Murdoch is based on a real-life chap... who was a Fifer.  They will be dancing on the streets of Raith tonight!

Thank you for a splendid story.

With all good wishes

John
Please visit us at www.poppingham.com

'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

port perran

Are we talking Roath Ravers here  :D  :D
I'll get round to fixing it drekkly me 'ansome.

Train Waiting

Quote from: port perran on September 20, 2023, 09:04:17 PMAre we talking Roath Ravers here  :D  :D

Yes indeed.  The Kingdom of Fife's finest.  Allegedly!

Their salubrious stadium is close to the former NBR part of the East Coast Route to Aberdeen.  I've seen it from the train many, many times.  Never been inside... fortunately.

Toodle-oo

John
Please visit us at www.poppingham.com

'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

port perran

Part Twenty

Next morning Daniel Brodie and Marie were enjoying their Cornish breakfast in the rather scruffy accommodation that was recommended by Big Bert.
Money was in very short supply which meant that Daniel would do literally anything to raise some cash. He and Marie had just about enough money to last perhaps two more days so something had to be done.

Last evening Bert had promised Daniel twenty five pounds if he could get his hands on a barrel of whisky from the St Agnes Distillery warehouse in Tregonning.
Daniel was, of course, well used to handling whisky barrels from his time in Glasgow so agreed to Beet's proposition on the understanding that he be provided with a burly assistant, a pick up truck and a driver.
The "job" was arranged for two days later  leaving plenty of  time for Daniel to visit the warehouse and devise a plan of action.

As far as Bert was concerned, whisky was whisky. He cared not whether Daniel got his hands on a newly laid down cask or one of the rarer vintage whiskies. Bert's idea was simply to bottle the stuff and sell it on.
Daniel, on the other hand, was much better informed. He soon realised that there was much more money to be made than the twenty five pounds promised. He determined to visit the warehouse that very afternoon to see for himself what was in there.

In the Cedars Hotel, Sandy and Doris had enjoyed a most relaxing sleep. They were now in the dining room, seated at the best table next to the huge window offering a panoramic view over Trevaunance Cove.
Sandy had chosen the full Cornish breakfast whilst Doris enjoyed poached eggs on white bread toast.

Jimmy Johnstone, of course, had taken the precaution of taking breakfast as soon as the dining room opened at seven o'clock. He was long gone by the time that Sandy and Doris took their seats sometime after eight thirty.

"Let's take a train down to St Ives today love", said Sandy, "It's beautiful down there and I have two days to myself before I do any police work".

Finishing their breakfast Doris suggested they take their time before catching a mid morning train to St Ives giving Sandy time to peruse the railway timetable.
He eventually settled on the 10-35 service to St Erth where they would change trains at 11-10 for the St Ives train.

Eventually the couple were aboard their train which departed St Agnes station right time.
As the ex Great Western small prarie tank pulled gently away from the platform Sandy caught sight of a very familiar figure sitting on a wooden bench on the opposite platform.
"It can't be", he said turning to his wife, "I can't believe my eyes. That man on the platform over there, it's Jimmy Johnstone".

Jimmy had decided to catch a train himself but to Newquay from where he would take a clifftop walk along the North Cornish coast. He did his best thinking whilst walking and he had some big decisions to make.

At 11-50 Jimmy's train departed. Jimmy was completely unaware that Sandy Murdoch had spotted him.


The train that willtake Sandy and Doris as far as St Erth approaches St Agnes station across the level crossing.
I'll get round to fixing it drekkly me 'ansome.

crewearpley40

Another lovely story and great photo whilst eating my breakfast

cornish yorkie

 :hellosign:  :greatpicturessign:
  Many thanks Martin, it's getting more and more intriguing  :thumbsup:
   stay safe regards Derek
ONLY ONE RULE ENJOY

keithbythe sea

Great stuff Martin. Very pleased to see that the simultaneous translation machine is up and working well.  :thumbsup:  :D

port perran

#72
Part Twenty One


For a lad from the Gorbals in Glasgow used to high rise tenement blocks, vandalised houses and partly boarded up shops the North Cornish coastline was, to Jimmy, just breathtaking.
He was enjoying the solitude as he walked East from Newquay. People strolling in the opposite direction all passed the time of day and the Autumnal sun was just warm enough without being overbearingly hot.

Jimmy was, in a way,  one  of the lucky ones living in the Gorbals, accepted by his fellow Glaswegians and able to walk into and drink in the pubs and clubs without comment. He was actually a fairly popular lad.
However, this popularity came at a price. Jimmy had been led astray virtually since he started school, not that he attended that often. His was a life of gangs, petty crime, drinking and intimidation of those who didn't fit in.
As he grew into his later teenage years Jimmy had become involved in more organised crime which brought him to the attention of the local police and a certain Sandy Murdoch in particular.

Even when he was working, assisting his Uncle Tom  at the Aichentoshan distillery, Jimmy was still tempted to stray into the darker side of life if and when the opportunity presented itself.

It was the lad's remarkable palate, allowing him to recognise and comment upon the various whiskies that abounded in Scotland which set him apart from others and could, perhaps, lead to his salvation.

Sandy Murdoch was well aware of young Jimmy Johnstone but began to recognise that perhaps the young laddie could be persuaded to follow the straight and narrow if given the opportunity.
Sandy was great friends with Walter McTavish the general manager at the Auchentoshan distillery and, over a game of golf one afternoon, the subject of Jimmy Johnstone came up.
Sandy was persuaded by his golfing partner that Jimmy was worth a second chance. He was highly regarded at the distillery.

Sandy, of course, also had his job to consider. Jimmy was a wanted man whom he had been tracking for several months. He had been assigned to track him as an under cover officer wherever Jimmy went. Hence Sandy found himself in Cornwall, but what should he do about the situation in which he found himself?

Jimmy continued to ramble, stopping every now and again to take in the view. Before long he had been walking for some two hours, finding himself at Watergate Bay.

Jimmy had come to a decision. He would enjoy a pint or two at a local hotel before retracing his steps.
With any luck he could be back at St Agnes in time to pop over to the distillery for a chat with Sir William.
It was, Jimmy felt, only fair to tell the distillery owner face to face.

Meanwhile, up in Silliness PC Peel had been doing a bit of investigation into the claims of the availability of illicit whisky made by Joe McDonald.
It seemed, from what Bob Peel had discovered that the whisky had originated from Daniel Brodie who had helped himself to several cases of Stratchclyde 10 year old. It seems that Daniel, in his hurry to make a few pounds, had not bothered to re-bottle the whisky and had left the batch numbers on the cases.
It was this slip up which led PC Peel to the name Daniel Brodie. He could make no connection however to Jimmy Johnstone as far as this particular incident was concerned.

PC Peel made a call to Glasgow police station who gave him a contact number for the Cedars Hotel in St Agnes, Cornwall.

Back in Cornwall Daniel Brodie had decided to visit the Tregonning warehouse fir himself the next afternoon. He wanted to be absolutely sure he knew what he was getting himself into and not leave it  entirely in the hands of Big Bert and his friends whom he didn't entirely trust.

Later that evening Sandy and Doris, having enjoyed a lovely day out in St Ives, returned to their hotel where they planned an early evening meal to round off the day.
The couple made their way to reception to collect their room key to be met with a smiling assistant "I have a message for you Sir from a PC Peel in a place called Silliness. I've never heard of it myself but the call sounded genuine"
"Ah, yes, PC Peel", replied Sandy, "I know him well. Thank you"

Sandy studied the sheet of paper with the message from the young constable.

I'll get round to fixing it drekkly me 'ansome.

Ed

Gosh, every episode ends with a cliffhanger  :)



Ed

dannyboy

Quote from: Ed on September 22, 2023, 10:27:09 AMGosh, every episode ends with a cliffhanger  :)

Ruddy annoying ain't it?  ;)
(But keep them coming Martin).
David.
I used to be indecisive - now I'm not - I don't think.
If a friend seems distant, catch up with them.

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