A Coarse Guide to the Steam Locomotive for ‘N’ Gauge Modellers

Started by Train Waiting, December 08, 2023, 09:15:27 AM

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Nbodger


Ed

Quote from: Nbodger on December 14, 2023, 12:39:34 PMMy guess is it is the link in post #39 causing the problem

I though that, but it's back to normal now  :confused1:

martyn

It seemed to be only that page.

I've now removed the link, and it seems OK again.......sorry!

The Wikipedia entry is more or less the same.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whyte_notation

Other sites have the names as well, but the first one I quoted was handy as it showed the wheels as well.

Interestingly, this history of the Mogul says the first UK example was a tank for the Garstang and Knott end railway circa 1870. This is the first time I've heard of this, the GER example is usually quoted as being first. Perhaps the GER was just the first tender engine in the UK of this type.

https://locomotive.fandom.com/wiki/2-6-0


Martyn

Ed


Graham

I may be a modern image modeller, but am really enjoying this fascinating thread. Thanks so much for going to all the effort John.

cheers

Firstone18

John, My thanks to you for taking the time and making a super effort with this series, I am enjoying reading it very much. As with many things like this, I am always prompted to delve into things I have read further to find out more!
Cheers :beers:
Finally, after waiting over 55 years I am building a permanent layout in a purpose built shed!

chrism

Quote from: Newportnobby on December 14, 2023, 12:32:54 PMI noticed that earlier and had to reduce the size to 80% but that made the text small, of course.
From what I can see it's @chrism reply #30 that didn't wrap

There was nothing in that post that wouldn't have wrapped - no long URLs or wide pics - and it looks properly wrapped to me.

grumbeast

A fascinating guide, its interesting now that I live on this side of the Atlantic, that while I used to think of Pacific's being the biggest thing out there, I now consider them as small secondary line locomotives! We didn't really have any of the huge articulated locos here in Canada, but we did have CPRs big 2-10-4 Selkirks and CN's main power at the end of steam were 4-8-4 Northerns.  There we still plenty of smaller types of course, but the distances involved also really dictated that locomotives got bigger and bigger.  What I was ignorant of when I first moved here, was realizing that is wasn't all long slow freight trains on rubbish trackwork. Much of the roadbed was exceptional and passenger speeds we often very high (the Canadian steam speed record was 112mph albeit with a smaller CPR 4-4-4)

Hope this isn't a hijack, just thought there are interesting comparisons to make

Graham

Newportnobby

Quote from: chrism on December 15, 2023, 01:35:42 PM
Quote from: Newportnobby on December 14, 2023, 12:32:54 PMI noticed that earlier and had to reduce the size to 80% but that made the text small, of course.
From what I can see it's @chrism reply #30 that didn't wrap

There was nothing in that post that wouldn't have wrapped - no long URLs or wide pics - and it looks properly wrapped to me.

Apologies. It was someone else but it's been corrected by the removal of a long link so all is well.

icairns

Quote from: martyn on December 14, 2023, 10:48:43 AMOn the GER, the experimental 0-10-0 tank engine designed by James Holden was always known as the Decapod.

Martyn

Apologies for yet another one of my thread drifts but Martyn's note reminded me of one of my favorite picture postcards - the Holden Decapod ("The Most Powerful Engine in the World").

Ian


Train Waiting

Hello Chums


The next postington in this never-ending series is delayed due to foreseen circumstances (going to the theatre, visiting a chum in hospital and that sort of stuff).

I'd like to thank you for all your fascinating, kind and helpful contributions - I returned home both yesterday and today to a queue of 'Alerts' which was just about as long as the queue at the motor omnibus stop after the theatre.

Thank you for your ideas about the first British 2-6-0, one of which has resulted in a frantic session in my library.  It even caused me to look at the internet, which is something I avoid when writing these postingtons.

Your excellent discussion points will inform some later posts.  I'll do my best to mention your post at the apposite time.  Thank you so much - all your comments are greatly appreciated.

Thanks again and all good wishes.

Toodle-oo

John
Please visit us at www.poppingham.com

'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)

The Table-Top Railway is an attempt to create, in British 'N' gauge,  a 'semi-scenic' railway in the old-fashioned style, reminiscent of the layouts of the 1930s to the 1950s.

For the made-up background to the railway and list of characters, please see here: https://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=38281.msg607991#msg607991

nickk

Morning John

What an absolutely fascinating and well written feature I absolutely love it. Just wanted to say thank you and keep up the good work   :thumbsup:

martyn

 :offtopicsign:  :offtopicsign:

Quote from: icairns on December 15, 2023, 04:10:53 PM
Quote from: martyn on December 14, 2023, 10:48:43 AMOn the GER, the experimental 0-10-0 tank engine designed by James Holden was always known as the Decapod.

Martyn

Apologies for yet another one of my thread drifts but Martyn's note reminded me of one of my favorite picture postcards - the Holden Decapod ("The Most Powerful Engine in the World").

Ian



All the more amazing as the GER suburban services at the time were worked by J69s with a few 2-42T and G4 0-4-4s.

The K77/LNER  N7s were still twelve years away, or so, and then only two of them.

Martyn

chrism

Quote from: martyn on December 16, 2023, 01:15:38 PMAll the more amazing as the GER suburban services at the time were worked by J69s.
The K77/LNER  N7s were still twelve years away, or so, and then only two of them.

According to the Wikipedia article about it, the Decapod was only built for political purposes in order to block the passage through Parliament of a new rival scheme for an electric railway by demonstrating that steam could accelerate passenger trains at a rate comparable to electric traction.

It achieved that purpose but was otherwise impractical for regular use, or for more to be built, since the short wheelbase and high weight would have required many bridges to be rebuilt or strengthened. Accordingly, after only 4 years, it was rebuilt as an 0-8-0 tender loco assigned to coal train workings in the March district, but proved no more capable than the G58s. It was scrapped in 1913 as nonstandard after a short working life.



martyn

:offtopicsign:  :offtopicsign:

Quote from: chrism on December 16, 2023, 01:58:35 PM
Quote from: martyn on December 16, 2023, 01:15:38 PMAll the more amazing as the GER suburban services at the time were worked by J69s.
The K77/LNER  N7s were still twelve years away, or so, and then only two of them.

According to the Wikipedia article about it, the Decapod was only built for political purposes in order to block the passage through Parliament of a new rival scheme for an electric railway by demonstrating that steam could accelerate passenger trains at a rate comparable to electric traction.

It achieved that purpose but was otherwise impractical for regular use, or for more to be built, since the short wheelbase and high weight would have required many bridges to be rebuilt or strengthened. Accordingly, after only 4 years, it was rebuilt as an 0-8-0 tender loco assigned to coal train workings in the March district, but proved no more capable than the G58s. It was scrapped in 1913 as nonstandard after a short working life.




Agreed, I was trying to keep the post short, or encourage others such as yourself to dig deeper if interested. I've several GER based books which quote aspects of the design and reason for building.

Decapod in the USA was a 2-10-0, but this was only 0-10-0.

The tender actually survived and was used behind, mainly, I think, B12s.

Martyn


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