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Author Topic: Teignbridge, Langstone & Holcombe- early '60s BR, 4x2 with multiple scenic areas  (Read 58676 times)

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Offline Caz

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Nicely done E-P, very unusual building and looks great in position, well done that boy.   :thumbsup:

Offline dodger112958

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 :greatpicturessign:

Looks superb in situ.
Ian
Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

Offline E Pinniger

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Teignbridge main signal box is actually the first structure I started work on, nearly a year ago (in fact I started it before I'd even built the baseboard, to see if I could manage scratchbuilding in 2mm scale). However I never got round to finishing it and until last month it was a bare shell with no windows or fine detail (see above). It's based on one of the boxes at Exeter St. Davids (from a plan in a book) but is not a particularly typical GWR design, so should hopefully blend into its ex-SR surroundings with the right paint scheme!









Here's the finally finished, but unpainted, signalbox. Window frames are from the Ratio etched set. The arrangement of framing is a bit weird and probably bears no resemblance to that on any real signalbox, as I didn't build the window apertures to match the frames (not having any of the latter at the time!) so when I eventually added the frames I had to fit them in as best I could. With hindsight I should have adapted the signalbox plan so a symmetrical arrangement of frames could be fitted, but as the front of the box faces away from the viewer when installed on the layout, it's not a huge issue.
The steps and their handrails are adapted from plastic kit parts, the other details are scratchbuilt (roof finials are the heads of brass pins!)








Painted in SR regional colours and weathered. I'm fairly pleased with the signalbox's final appearance, though it still would probably have been better to start again from scratch! The windows are glazed using "Kristal Klear" as I wasn't able to install clear sheet for glazing as usual (having glued the roof on before fitting the window frames!). It works quite well for glazing etched windows, as the small panes/apertures mean it dries very quickly.










In place on the layout. The signals themselves, along with other small details (coal bunkers, PW huts etc.) and "clutter" are among the many, many things still to be added!

Next are pics of the main station train shed + roof, then I'll have to sort out some photos of the new buildings for the junction station (now weathered and ready to install)

Offline E Pinniger

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The train shed/overall roof for Teignbridge station, with its retaining walls, road overbridge and (eventually) passenger footbridge, is by far the biggest structure on the whole layout. I made the basic "shell" of the train shed a while ago, so I could get an idea of its footprint and visual impact; however, it took me a while to get round to finishing it! As I previously mentioned, it's inspired by/loosely based on the one at Exeter Central station, which had a wooden train shed until the station's 1930s rebuild, as well as substantial brick retaining walls which remain to this day.










This is the retaining wall and bridge structure, painted and weathered. It's made from Slaters textured sheet over a core of thick styrene sheet, painted with various acrylic paints (Humbrol #62 for the brick retaining walls), then heavily weathered with drybrushing, oil washes and powders. The wall structure is somewhat simplified (no arches, for example), as it isn't particularly visible on the completed model (the sloping retaining wall faces away from the viewer, and the wall on the other side is mostly hidden under the roof).  All the completely hidden surfaces, and those facing the viewer, are simply painted in satin black, matching the baseboard sides. To get at the inevitable derailed trains, there's a large cutout in the near side and the roof is completely removable, being held in place by mini (neodymium) magnets.




This is the train shed roof before repainting. Its general shape is based on the old Exeter Central roof, but not having any photos of the roof's top surface I had to rely on guesswork (and again some simplification). I decided to use paint and varnish to represent the roof glazing, rather than clear plastic; since the rear two-thirds of the station isn't modelled, there isn't much to see under the roof!



The road overbridge conceals the entrance to the "tunnel". A covered footbridge/walkway will eventually go between it and the train shed. The station building is (again like Exeter Central) supposed to be at street level somewhere off to the right, and connected to the platforms via the walkway.












Finally here is the completed and painted train shed. The "glazing" was drybrushed with various sooty grey and brownish colours before receiving several coats of gloss varnish, to give the effect of grimy skylights badly in need of cleaning! The truncated platforms are evident in some of the photos but don't show up from normal viewing angles. There's still a lot to add (lighting, seats, signage, adverts etc.) but it now at least looks like a station!



The space on the far side of the supporting wall will eventually house an assortment of structures and clutter relating to the adjacent (low-relief) engine shed - water crane, coal staithes, tool sheds etc. But I need to build the engine shed first! I still haven't decided on a prototype to base it on; any suggestions?









Here are some overall views of Teignbridge side as it is now (including a couple with trains). Still a lot of work to do and a lot of empty spaces, but it is definitely making some progress now. Overall I'm quite pleased with how the buildings and scenery are going - I wish I could say the same about the running quality of some of my locos and stock, but that's another story!


The next update should show some additions to the junction station (Coryton) as well as pics of the Hymek and other rolling stock. I'm also hoping to make a start on landscaping the branch section (currently 95% bare plywood)
« Last Edit: May 09, 2013, 06:41:39 pm by E Pinniger »

Offline Pengi

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 Terrific work :claphappy:
Just one Pendolino, give it to me, a beautiful train, from Italy

Offline E Pinniger

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Here's the finished Hymek! As previously mentioned, it isn't the most accurate model around (the shape of the cab roofs in particular isn't right) but does look like a Hymek from a distance, and runs very smoothly with its new-ish Bachmann chassis. I also found that I'd painted the lower body the wrong shade of green (should be more of a bright lime green than olive) but being heavily weathered this isn't too evident. The BR crests are from Fox Transfers, other markings are hand painted.

I'm hoping to make a start on landscaping the branch section soon. Currently I'm working on painting and weathering an assortment of box vans.

Offline E Pinniger

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I forgot to post these pics with the last update - these are the 3 Southern Region green Mk1 coaches I've weathered so far (I have three more as yet unweathered). They're all a mixture of Farish products from various periods, from the earliest Poole issues to BachFar - the weathering and partial repainting gives them more consistency of appearance, as well as hopefully more realism.








As with the maroon Mk1s I've already done, I repainted the roofs, underframes, bogies and ends, leaving the sides untouched other than painting the door handles in brass on the older models (handles on the newer ones are already painted). They're then weathered with oil washes, drybrushing and powders.
The train is hauled by a Battle of Britain class "Spitfire" (old Poole Farish model as usual, but not a bad runner) which will eventually get some additional detailing, a partial repaint, and etched nameplates/crest if I can find any! (now that Fox Transfers are no longer producing etched plates in N, are there any alternative sources?)







I now have a total of 10 painted and weathered mineral wagons (including standard BR 16-tonners) - not exactly a huge train but still looks quite impressive on my small layout! The loco is a Minitrix Ivatt 2MT which will likely be the next one to get detailed, repainted and weathered; the plastic bodyshell will make this much easier than with a metal-bodied Farish model. Though this particular Minitrix product is notorious for its lack of traction and pulling power, my example isn't too bad - it slips a bit on curves but will pull a 10-15 wagon train with no problems, and with pickup on every wheel is a totally reliable runner even at very low speeds.



On the subject of freight trains, I recently picked up a bargain lot of second-hand Peco wagon loads on eBay - once these have been painted (in the case of the brick, wood + crate loads) or covered with coal or stone scatter (the mineral loads) there will be no excuse for running 90% of my open wagons empty as seen above! I did try making my own wagon loads using strips and blocks of wood, but never succeeded in getting them the right size/shape to fit neatly in the wagon at the right height.


Currently I'm working on the scenery for the branch section of the layout (mostly done now, only the final layer of scatter material plus trees and bushes to add) as well as putting the finishing touches on the box vans I mentioned in the last post. Photos of these soon hopefully.

Offline daveg

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Just run through the more recent posts to catch up.

Fantastic stuff!  :thumbsup:

Dave G


Offline Newportnobby

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Very nice, E-P.
Everything looks toned down really well :thumbsup:

Offline E Pinniger

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Haven't posted an update in a while but I've still been busy working on the layout. Whilst I've now finished most of the scenic modelling and am making steady progress populating the layout with buildings, the most significant change I've made recently isn't immediately visible - I've relaid all of the main line track in the "tunnel" area underneath the branch line, which has massively improved the layout's running reliability.
This was the worst bit of track on the whole layout, with diabolical reverse curves, uneven Flexitrack curves (some unneccessarily sub-radius 1) and a non-functioning insulfrog point. Anything other than diesels hauling bogie stock was prone to derail, stall or both; larger steam locos with pony trucks and tenders were particularly bad. I laid this track about a year ago when I was too inexperienced (my only previous N gauge tracklaying being a simple Setrack test circuit) to realise that things like reverse curves, points in tunnels and uneven Flexitrack were very bad news for reliable running!
All of my earlier amateurish tracklaying efforts had been subsequently relaid or (the main station yard for example) entirely redone from scratch, but the "tunnel" was left untouched as I (unwisely) built the upper level baseboard on top at an early stage of the layout's construction. Recently I was getting increasingly frustrated with the poor running caused by the track, and as I couldn't see any way to fix it short of temporarily removing the upper level, I was seriously contemplating rebuilding the entire layout from scratch. However, I eventually managed to relay it using pre-assembled lengths of Setrack R1 curves, with the track pins very carefully pushed in with a long-handled screwdriver. This has made a massive difference - with even curves and the elimination of the reverse curves and redundant point, the track in the tunnel is now completely reliable; anything will run through it, on either line or direction, with no more stalling or derailment than anywhere else on the layout. Being able to run trains reliably all around the main line circuit has made the layout a lot more enjoyable to operate - constantly having to retrieve derailed trains of wagons from the tunnel or re-rail locos with jammed pony trucks tends to take the fun out of things!

I don't have any photos of the new track, but here are the buildings I've recently completed:










This is the station building for the GWR junction station (Coryton). This is based on a plan (in a book on GWR country station) for Culkerton station on the Tetbury branch in Gloucester. It caught my eye as a distinctive and attractive design, and being narrow and overhanging the back of the platform is ideal for Holcombe with its narrow platforms (Culkerton station was actually built on an embankment, hence the narrow building and lightweight wooden construction).
I built the model from styrene sheet + strip with Ratio roof tiles and doors + windows from the spares box; The roof finials are brass pins.










Here's the building in place on the platform. The station is still looking very bare and incomplete without fences, lamps, signs etc., but the building has given a lot more character to this corner of the layout. The pagoda shelters (mentioned in an earlier update) are slightly modified plastic kits.






This Dapol 45xx "Small Prairie" was a recent eBay bargain (35 inc. postage). It's doubled the number of "new" steam locos in my collection (the other being a Dapol 14xx!) and given me a completely reliable and smooth running (if a bit high-geared, like the 14xx) engine for running local passenger trains on the main line. At some point (soon hopefully) I'll replace the "BRITISH RAILWAYS" lettering (not really suited to my layout's late 50s/early 60s setting) with early BR crests, and add some weathering.

Offline E Pinniger

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This is Coryton water tower, which is yet another Ratio kit. I do like the Ratio building kits though as they're very finely detailed, go together easily and are very suited to my layout's region and era - hence it's hard to pass them up when I see cheap second-hand ones at shows! I've modified the cranes slightly with metal wire framing instead of thin styrene rod as suggested (which looked far too fragile) and hoses made from thin-walled styrene tube squashed slightly with a pair of pliers.



And the water cranes included in the Ratio kit. One (with the base) will go on the station platform, the other in the yard by the engine shed. I also scratchbuilt a drain funnel for the crane on the platform - this is made from scrap plastic parts carved to shape + hollowed out at the top.












The tower and cranes in place in the station yard (and another shot of the 45xx)








Finally, some overall views of Coryton station area which with the new buildings is looking a lot less bare and unfinished, though it still has a long way to go. I really need to get round to re-surfacing the "backscene" as I've done on the other side, as those visible woodwork joints don't really add to the appearance! The Bedford bus in BR livery is the only painted road vehicle I currently have, but I've got numerous metal kits for lorries, buses and cars which will be completed in future. The area behind where it's parked is the station's rather minimal goods yard and will eventually have a yard crane, corrugated stores hut and wooden coal staithes. The cattle dock (Ratio kit) will go on the other siding.
You can also catch a glimpse of part of the newly added scenery in the branch section - this will be shown in the next update or two.

Offline Newportnobby

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Superb buildings E-P :thumbsup:
How do the passengers get from/to the platforms though :confused2:

Offline E Pinniger

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Superb buildings E-P :thumbsup:
How do the passengers get from/to the platforms though :confused2:

Forgot to mention that - there will be a footbridge connecting the two platforms and the station yard where the bus is parked. This is something I've been meaning to add for ages, but I haven't found any suitable scale drawings of GWR footbridges to base it on (plenty of photos, but I want to get the proportions of the steps right). I may end up buying a Ratio or similar kit and scratchbuilding the sides/roof.

Offline Jerry Howlett

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Have to give this a BIG WOW !!!!
Some days its just not worth gnawing through the straps.

Offline daveg

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Nice work E-P

 :greatpicturessign:

Dave G

 

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