!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: Teignbridge, Langstone & Holcombe- early '60s BR, 4x2 with multiple scenic areas  (Read 58379 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline RikkiGTR

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 54
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • YouTube
    • Awards
Excellent work, great little layout  :claphappy:
"I hate vulgar realisms in literature. The man who could call a spade a spade should be compelled to use one..."

- Oscar Wilde

Offline E Pinniger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23704
  • Posts: 320
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • PhotoBucket
    • Awards
Next, a couple of detailed + repainted locos. Having painted + weathered a fair amount of rolling stock lately, I thought it was about time I made a start on giving some of my locomotive collection similar treatment. Whilst most newer N gauge locos have superb detailing, with features like separate handrails modelled far more finely and neatly than most modellers (certainly myself) could hope to manage, models from earlier generations (which make up most of my collection!) tend to be simple and chunky one-piece mouldings and benefit a lot from a bit of extra detailing work.
Up to now, my only "reworked" steamer was the Lima 4F which is an absolutely lousy runner despite my best efforts at improving it! So for my next project I picked one of my two Farish (Poole-era with metal chassis) 94xx pannier tanks. This loco type is perfectly suited to my layout's region and era, can be used for local freight, passenger trains and shunting, and is also a very smooth and reliable runner (at least, both of my examples are; maybe I'm lucky!) This one will be painted in BR black livery with late logo, to match my layout's early 1960s setting. My other 94xx will eventually get a similar detailing job and be repainted in post-war GWR livery, to allow me to occasionally run pre-BR trains.





Here's the detailed bodyshell. The tank side rails have been replaced with brass wire (no handrail knobs required, as the prototype rails didn't have them) and I've added various other small details, including the prominent handrail around the smokebox, number plates, lamp brackets (thin bits of etched brass scrap bent into L shapes), vacuum pipes (Langley Models castings), tank vents (tiny copper dome-headed rivets) and the smokebox door handle (which is a handrail knob and a small V-shaped bit of brass wire). Lamps will be added once the loco is painted, again using Langley castings.
I didn't attempt to add every missing detail or replace every handrail with wire - I might have added a few more wire handrails had it been a plastic bodyshell, but cutting off the metal ones is a real pain and, I thought, not worth the effort except for the largest and most visible rails on the tank sides.
A lot of the added detail here looks rather crude and lumpy compared to the likes of the Dapol 57xx, but it looks a lot better on the actual model.





Painted and decaled, with lamps in place. The base colours are Revell satin and matt black acrylic (matt on the smokebox and chimney). The satin black maybe looks a little too shiny but will be dulled down when it's weathered.  Buffer beams are Games Workshop/Citadel "Mephiston Red" which is a good scale colour for these - being slightly duller and darker than bright "post office" red. The chimney and safety valve are lightly drybrushed with copper and brass metallic paint to represent the underlying metal showing through worn/flaked black paint. I numbered it (though the numbers are barely legible!) as 8403, a Newton Abbot-based locomotive, and the lamp position is for a local freight train.
I didn't attempt to paint any of the wheels and chassis, but instead just blackened the wheel rims, coupling rod and exposed pickup sections using a black marker pen.







Finally, here's the completed, weathered loco on my layout. The lighting in these photos is not very flattering as it highlights all the flaws and doesn't show up the weathering well, but it looks better in person. Weathering was mainly done with powders, along with a dark silver pencil for paint chips on the steps + footplate and a black oil wash on the buffer beams. It could really do with crew figures, but the cab is already occupied by a motor!





The next in line for rebuilding was an old Farish 51xx "Large Prairie". This was detailed using exactly the same techniques and materials as I used on the Pannier, and similarly has a cast zinc alloy body which is a real pain to work with compared to plastic or white metal! Again, I have two of these locos, and the second will eventually end up in late GWR livery to haul my old Farish GWR coaches.



Painted and lined, ready for decals and weathering. The green paint isn't quite the right shade, I started painting it using Railmatch acrylics but found they covered poorly and left noticeable brush marks, so I stripped the paint off and used the closest Humbrol match I could find instead (would have used Revell, but none of their greens are anywhere near the right shade). Lining was added with a very fine brush - I've tried using a lining pen previously but haven't had much success, as acrylics dry too quickly for the very fine lines needed for N gauge.





On the layout with some Mk1 and Collett coaches (the latter in need of some weathering). Again, the closeups mercilessly show up any flaws in the paintwork, notably the poor finish of the green paint due to having to scrape + sand off the original Railmatch finish, but it looks better in real life and certainly a lot better than the unmodified RTR bodyshell! I also now realise that the early BR logo is wrong for the green paint scheme, I may fix this in future. I may as well have painted it the correct black in the first place and avoided the problems with the Railmatch green paint!

I'll post some more (and hopefully better) photos of these locos in future, along with some other repainted rolling stock. The next update should show some of the buildings I've been working on recently.

Offline Caz

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23044
  • Posts: 5254
  • Country: es
  • Gender: Female
  • Fairford Branch ticket 1958
    • Twitter
    • YouTube
    • Skype
    • Awards
Nicely done E-P, some really effective detail work, certainly makes the old Farish kettles a bit more life like.   :thumbsup:

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+63)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 29595
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Lubbly Jubbly :thumbsup:

Offline E Pinniger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23704
  • Posts: 320
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • PhotoBucket
    • Awards


Next, buildings!  Here are some kits I've completed over the last month - Ratio's GWR engine shed and signalbox, Dornaplas pagoda shelters, and Kestrel bungalow, all of which will be going on the junction side of the layout. I also have Ratio's cattle dock and GWR water tower, plus a few Kestrel and Dornaplas town buildings; the rest of the structures on the layout (mostly on the town/main station side and on the branch) will be scratchbuilt.




The bungalow/holiday cottage had a lot of small details added, to make it look a bit more like a house and less like a plain brick box! The coal bunker and some of the other bits were left over from the Ratio engine shed kit. It will go in the corner next to the branch line curve, and will have a small garden fenced off from the track.





The Ratio signalbox is apparently based on one at Exeter. The fine etched brass window frames look impressively "scale" compared to plastic mouldings.





Ratio's GWR engine shed is a common sight on N gauge layouts, but it's such a perfect fit - in both senses of the word - for the junction yard that I had to have one!  The window frames are printed clear plastic rather than etched brass, but they don't actually look too bad on the completed building.



The Dornaplas pagodas are tiny but quite finely moulded. I modified one (which will go on the island platform) with doors on both sides, and put a notice board on the other.

You might also notice that I've updated the thread title, as I've finally decided on names for the various locations (this was a while ago, but I didn't realise you could edit the title of the original thread post). All the names are based on real locations in the South Devon area; Teignbridge (the town) isn't the name of a settlement in real life, but used to be the name for the Teignmouth area district council; not sure if it's still in use but I remember often seeing "Teignbridge Council" or similar on signs in that area. It seemed like a good name for a fictional south/east Devon town!
 Coryton (the junction station) is an actual location on the line between Dawlish and Teignmouth, more or less where the station on my layout is supposed to be situated; and Holcome (the light railway terminus) is a village a short distance inland from the latter. The fictional Holcombe is supposed to be a lot further inland  (not too far from the edge of Dartmoor, hence the granite quarry) than the real one, but I thought it was a good name all the same!
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 04:31:25 pm by E Pinniger »

Offline E Pinniger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23704
  • Posts: 320
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • PhotoBucket
    • Awards



The signal box in place next to the RH tunnel portal on the junction side. It will eventually get a nameplate! You might also spot that I've started weathering the track, using a mixture of dark weathering powders applied with a stiff brush. I added more grime to the tracks at station platforms and in yards, with particularly dark sooty/oily staining in locations (such as at the ends of platforms) where locos are likely to sit, and dustings of light grey ash along the tracks outside the engine shed.





The engine shed has a removable roof in case of derailments! It needs the addition of scatter + weeds at the base to blend it in with the yard surface. The yard (along with the rest of the layout) needs the addition of fences, storage sheds, and other smaller details and general clutter, which will be added some time in the future! The empty space visible behind the shed will likely be occupied by a cattle dock (Ratio kit) in future.




The pagodas are now in place on the station platforms, but the station is still distinctly unfinished-looking! There will eventually be a stone-built station building (scratchbuilt) on the main platform, likely with a goods shed over the end of the siding behind it and adjoining the platform (as at Buckfastleigh on the South Devon Railway) and a footbridge (again probably scratch) connecting the two platforms and the access road at the back.




An overall view of this side of the layout - still very incomplete but starting to acquire some "life" with the addition of buildings as well as trees and scenery.
The Dapol 14xx was a Christmas present and is a rather better runner than the assortment of second-hand Minitrix and Farish locos which make up the rest of my collection. It will eventually be repainted in BR black (with early logo) and lightly weathered - no extra detailing should be needed though! I've since bought a Dapol Autocoach in carmine & cream livery, but in this photo it's pulling an old Farish suburban coach, a generic design but pretty close to GWR "B" stock in general appearance. This is also in definite need of some repainting and light weathering to tone down the bright white roof.







I've also been doing some work on the town buildings. One row of terraced houses and a shop/pub unit, kitbashed from Dornaplas and Kestrel kits, are nearly completed and ready or painting, and I've started work on another terraced row (scratchbuilt). There will be more buildings in future including a shallow-relief warehouse adjacent to the station yard. The card rectangle and chimney base show the footprint and approximate location of the yard water tower/pumping station building which will be another scratchbuilt based on one originally at Axminster. Another signal box will be sited next to it.






Finally, I've done a bit more work on the main station's train shed; the retaining walls and roof base have been lowered by 1cm, as I thought it really looked too high before (considering that it will eventually have a peaked roof adding another 30-40% to the overall height). I've also started adding the structural detail and brickwork to the retaining walls and the bridge which runs along the backscene behind the train shed. These will be shown in more detail in a later update. The whole assembly is not fixed in place at the moment, but eventually the walls, bridge and girders will be glued to the baseboard and the roof removable and held in place with magnets.

Offline Caz

  • Moderator
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23044
  • Posts: 5254
  • Country: es
  • Gender: Female
  • Fairford Branch ticket 1958
    • Twitter
    • YouTube
    • Skype
    • Awards
Coming on a treat E-P, the track weathering looks particularly effective, well done that man.  :thumbsup:

Offline E Pinniger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23704
  • Posts: 320
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • PhotoBucket
    • Awards
Since the last update I've revised the track plan for the town (Teignbridge) side of the layout - I've ended up relaying all the track for the station yard, other than the engine shed lines.
The original layout of the yard - in the photo above - made absolutely no sense either prototypically or operationally; goods trains had to run directly into the yard rather than reversing into it (so the engine ended up trapped at the end of the siding), the industry spur was, due to the location of its point) unusable by anything more than a small loco and single wagon (and even then only when the goods shed line was empty) and there was nowhere to store a shunter without preventing other trains from using the siding. To be honest I didn't really know what I was doing when I designed the original setup - I had little knowledge of either prototype practice or what would be most practical for operating the layout, and was trying (unsuccessfully!) to scale down a larger, more complex track plan to fit the space I had available.
I had been thinking of rebuilding the yard for a while, but wasn't sure how to do it without having to relay the main line as well (which I really didn't want). I eventually thought of a plan which would do what I wanted whilst needing minimal relaying of the main line track. Here's what I did (after painting, ballasting and weathering):



As you can see, I've also been working on the buildings for this area - more photos of these in the next update (hopefully!). Some of the houses for the town backscene are also complete, but weren't glued in place when these photos were taken, though some of the road surfaces have been painted. The train shed roof is also complete though absent in the photos.



Trains now have to reverse into the yard from the station's bay platform. The line to the goods shed and engine shed runs off from this line, there's enough room on the head shunt for 3-4 short wheelbase wagons, or a couple of larger ones, to be shunted at a time. Both the goods shed and head shunt lines have secondary sidings which can be used to store the yard shunter, brake vans detached from trains, or odd wagons (the head shunt's siding also doubles as the spur for the as yet undecided industrial building - possibly a carriage gas works as found at Exeter St. Davids - which will be located here)
I had to relay the section between the bay platform/yard point and the main line, including the point on the latter (which I replaced as the original one was unreliable) but otherwise the main line track is untouched. Relaying the yard track was a fair amount of work, but I'm very pleased with the results; as well as looking a lot better, the new yard is a huge improvement operationally on the old one. I can now run goods trains into the yard and detach the engine, and use a shunter to move stock into the goods shed or storage sidings.

Offline E Pinniger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23704
  • Posts: 320
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • PhotoBucket
    • Awards
I've also been doing some work on locos and rolling stock. I need to do a lot more of the latter as most of my wagon collection is in need of repainting and weathering!



The latest addition to my locomotive collection is a Type 14 diesel-hydraulic shunter/general purpose loco - a type very suited to my layout's location and era. It's based on a Parkwood resin body which was a chance bargain purchase on eBay. The Parkwood body is designed for the Minitrix DB V60 chassis but after carving out some of the resin inside the 14 body, I managed to fit it on an old Farish GP tank chassis, a much more affordable option (especially since I already had one!). This doesn't have the distinctive drive crank of the real 14 chassis, and the wheelbase and wheelsize are slightly different, but it looks close enough to me once painted, particularly since the drive crank's location is mostly hidden behind the cab steps.










To be honest I wasn't particularly impressed by the detail or casting quality of the Parkwood body, especially the solid cab windows, and the casting has a general lack of "crispness" and straight edges. To be fair to Parkwood, it's a fairly old product no longer in production and their newer loco bodyshells (such as the SR diesel shunter released recently) look a lot better.
I managed to drill + carve out the cab interior, and also added a number of additional details such as handrails and lamps from brass rod and styrene. The most noticeable addition is the cab steps which oddly are missing from the original casting. The buffers are metal castings from my spares box.










This is the completed + painted model. It's numbered as D9522 which was actually the station pilot at Reading, not far from where I live (not sure what it's doing in the West Country!). It doesn't exactly compare to the newer Farish model in terms of finish and detail, but looks good enough at the normal viewing distance of a foot or so (closeup photos really aren't kind to N gauge models, even some RTR commercial products look crude and chunky in closeup). The bodyshell also has a slight "banana" curve to it which I didn't spot until I took these photos - too late to fix it now, though had I spotted it first think I could have straightened the resin casting with hot water.







Some pictures of the 14 with a short train of mineral wagons (still empty - making some removable wagon loads is high on my priority list). I've painted and weathered one more 16t wagon, but still have some way to go till I can run a scale-length train of them!




Also here are 3 more completed wagons (the only ones I've done recently). On the left is a Lima ferry van (modified slightly to look more like the BR type than the continental one it actually is, repainted and weathered) and a Minitrix PO coal/coke wagon (underframe and interior painted, heavily weathered). The PO coal wagon on the right (repainted Peco) is based on a prototype operated by a namesake! - the coal merchants F.W. Pinniger of Calne, Wiltshire (possibly a distant relative as my grandfather's family lived in Ramsbury, Wiltshire, not too far from Calne). Dapol produced a limited-edition OO gauge model of this wagon a while ago (now fetching high prices on eBay alas) which inspired me to paint my own version in N gauge using an old unpainted Peco wagon I had in the spares box. This is the original:

It's actually a 6-plank wagon, whilst the Peco body I used is a 7-plank, so I gave it a different number (not that you can read it at normal viewing distances!). It also has a load of coal, made using a Peco moulding with finely ground real coal glued on top.

As mentioned earlier, painting more freight rolling stock is high on my priority list of things to do next.








Another new loco is this Class 35 Hymek (WIP in these photos, but now completed, painted and weathered - more photos in a future update) which I scratchbuilt to go on one of the numerous US diesel chassis I've picked up cheaply on eBay. In these photos it's on an old Bachmann GP38 but this has since been replaced by a newer (much smoother running and also the correct width for the body) split-frame Bachmann chassis.
The Hymek is a type I've always wanted for my layout, being a common sight in the West Country in the early 1960s, but the current Dapol model is way out of my budget (even the dummy version is 30+) so I decided to build my own. It's not the most accurate representation of a Hymek (in particular, the cab roofs aren't curved enough and the distinctive frame around the bufferbeam is missing) but is my first attempt at scratchbuilding a loco in N gauge, and doesn't look too bad now it's painted.

The main structure of the bodyshell is made from styrene sheet and based on the drawings in R S Carter's "British Railways Main Line Diesels". Grilles and frames are made from etched parts, other details from styrene strip/rod and spares box oddments.

Offline dodger112958

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 341
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
 :thankyousign:

Just read the whole thread and watched your layout evolve. Very impressive and inspirational.
Regards
Ian
Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+63)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 29595
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
What a great update, E-P.
Really enjoyed looking at your work :thumbsup:

Online EtchedPixels

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (+44)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 16353
  • 2mm Association Number: 4412
  • Posts: 8250
  • Country: wales
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • Google+
    • Twitter
    • YouTube
    • Etched Pixels
    • Awards
Looks superb from here.. definitely captures the feel of a Hymek.
"Knowledge has no value or use for the solitary owner: to be enjoyed it must be communicated" -- Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden

Offline Dock Shunter

  • Trade Count: (+10)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1757
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • YouTube
    • Awards
Looks superb from here.. definitely captures the feel of a Hymek.

Yep....have to agree....for a scratch built 35 you have done a fantastic job E-P...... :thumbsup:
The layout is coming along very nicely too.... :thumbsup:

Offline E Pinniger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23704
  • Posts: 320
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • PhotoBucket
    • Awards
I've finally got round to sorting out all the photos of the new buildings and writing up the posts for them, so here they are (starting with the terraced houses). I haven't done much work on the layout over the last month, having mainly been working on my OO  :-[ layout and other modelling projects, but over the last week I've built the station building (scratchbuilt) and water tower + cranes (Ratio kit) for Coryton station, as well as weathering a rake of green Mk1 coaches, so will post these next along with some photos of the finished Hymek (I already took some, but most ended up out of focus due to poor lighting)





This is one of the two (so far) rows of terraced houses in the town backscene. These ones are scratchbuilt from Slaters + Ratio textured sheet with commercial windows, doors, gutters etc.










Here are the painted and weathered houses, complete with pavement! The house on the end at right-angles is based on a Dornaplas kit with scratchbuilt roof.





In place on the layout, along with the other terrace (see below). They will eventually have (small!) fenced yards backing onto the railway line.





This is the other row of terraced houses, in this case half-relief and built from Dornaplas kits with scratchbuilt roofs/chimneys (I got a whole load of Dornaplas house kits, minus their roofs, in a lot of building spares bought on eBay). This row is painted with a stucco/rendering finish in various shades. I forgot to get a photo of them in unpainted condition!

Weathering for both models was done using diluted oil washes, mostly black and dark brown, with some spots of green on the roof to represent algae/moss growth. I then used weathering powders to add soot/grime staining, mainly on the roof.

Offline E Pinniger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23704
  • Posts: 320
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Ebay
    • PhotoBucket
    • Awards






Now onto railway buildings: this is the water tower, with pumping station (hence the chimney) for Teignbridge. It's modelled on the one formerly at Axminster, an article on this building with scale drawings was published in an old copy of Railway Modeller I picked up at a show. The chimney is from the Ratio kit, the rest is scratchbuilt, using some OO arched window mouldings as I couldn't find any N ones of the right size/shape. The roof access ladder has been left off at this stage to prevent damage.










The structure painted in SR regional colours, and weathered (still missing the roof ladder). The green paint is Revell acrylic "Sea Green". Not a perfect match for SR green, but not far off especially once weathered.










Here's the water tower installed between the main line and yard headshunt. Like the prototype at Axminster it's very close to the track (the prototype is actually even closer but is on a straight rather than a curve).

 

Please Support Us!
October Goal: £55.00
Due Date: Oct 31
Total Receipts: £55.00
Below Goal: £0.00
Site Currency: GBP
100% 
October Donations


Advertise Here