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Author Topic: Teignbridge, Langstone & Holcombe- early '60s BR, 4x2 with multiple scenic areas  (Read 58374 times)

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Offline Newportnobby

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I agree with Paul. Cracking little layout with lots of thought going into it :thumbsup:
If you get yourself a yummy Tiramisu from Tesco for 2, the plastic tray will provide enough glazing for your Flying Banana ;)

N.B. Yummy Tiramisus maybe available from other stores, but I can't promise that :laugh:

Offline Sprintex

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That will be the Tesco tiramisu that famously states "do not turn upside down" . . .



Printed on the UNDERNEATH of the cardboard sleeve!!  :smiley-laughing:


Paul

Online Jerry Howlett

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That will be the Tesco tiramisu that famously states "do not turn upside down" . . .
Printed on the UNDERNEATH of the cardboard sleeve!!  :smiley-laughing:
Paul

Not only do I believe you I will be checking them out when I am over.
from the Home of the Tiramisu.. mmmmmmmmm :food: :food:
Some days its just not worth gnawing through the straps.

Offline E Pinniger

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Thanks again for the replies, and the suggestions for glazing the railcar (possibly something like banoffee pie would be more appropriate than tiramisu for glazing a Flying Banana, but it isn't actually a "Banana" - it's the later, less streamlined type, which doesn't seem to have a nickname).
I'll probably use "Kristal Kleer" for glazing the windows, which gives a very good flush-glazed effect - I've used it on the Mk1 coaches. It doesn't work on apertures that are too large, as it relies on the surface tension of the material (basically very thick PVA glue) to form a film, but I think the railcar windows are small enough. Failing that, I'll use thin clear plastic as suggested.

Offline E Pinniger

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Here's some photos of the scenery with the rest of the vegetation added. Most of the photos are rather uninspired partly due to poor lighting conditions, I'll take some more (with trains) soon!
I used a variety of different scatter materials, and referred to photos of the actual South Devon main line in an attempt to get the overgrowth on the cliffs looking right. The shrubs/bushes are made from the "foliage" material in Woodland Scenics OO/HO tree kits.




I also planted a few trees in the patch of open ground below the cliffs. I got these in an eBay lot of building/scenery bits; don't know who they're made by or what species they're intended to represent (the small one may be a silver birch) but they look quite convincing with the plastic trunks/branches repainted. There will be a few more trees on this side of the layout when it's finished, along with a fair number on the branch section.




The portals for the branch line tunnel are now installed. Like the concrete portal on the town side, they're resin castings, which I cut down a fair bit to get them to fit the scenery. The clearance for the portals is quite tight (since the tunnel's on a curve) so I checked the positioning very carefully before finally gluing them in place. I tested the clearance with a Minitrix Class 27 pulling a Mk1 suburban coach, which will just about make it, so anything smaller is OK (0-6-0 locos and non-bogie rolling stock are all that will be running on the branch most of the time).
The tunnel interior is inaccessible other than the portals, but is short enough that this doesn't cause any problems with cleaning track or retrieving derailed stock.



The other side of the tunnel (the branch section) is intended to represent a different geographical area (close to Dartmoor), hence the granite rather than sandstone rock face. Unlike the main line it's rather overgrown with weeds and shrubs encroaching on the track from both sides! I've only "landscaped" this small area of the branch section so far, as I haven't decided exactly what it's going to feature in the way of buildings, roads, scenery etc. The backdrop will also be cleaned up and repainted at some point.




The tunnel portal on the town side is also glued in place (since taking the photo I've repainted the scenery around it), after repainting for a more convincing "weathered concrete" effect (I painted a base coat of light grey-brown, then stippled various paler shades over this, finally adding a couple of washes to highlight the detail), and soot staining added using charcoal powder.

Offline Newportnobby

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Very good work, EP :thumbsup:
I'll be well pleased if mine comes out as good, so I hope you're pleased as well

Offline Lawrence

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Looks great EP, perhaps a little greenery around the top of that last tunnel mouth just to break up the sharp edges

Offline longbridge

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Very nice modelling, those cliff faces look A1  :thumbsup:
Keep on Smiling
Dave.

Offline E Pinniger

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I haven't posted an update for a while, but have been fairly busy over the last few months with additions to my N gauge layout (though rebuilding my small OO gauge layout - on a slightly larger baseboard to allow for a complete radius 1 oval - has been a distraction). I've mostly been building the platforms for the two main stations, along with painting and weathering some rolling stock. I've also been working on some kit buildings and the tunnel portals, which will be in the next update.

Firstly, here's how I made the station platforms - these are scratchbuilt from styrene sheet. Scratchbuilding allowed me to make platforms that exactly matched the track curvature - particularly necessary for the junction station.











First I worked out the shape of the platforms using a "brass rubbing" technique with a pencil to create an impression of the track alignment on a piece of paper. I then used these paper tracings to create templates for making the platforms in styrene. I first made a basic "box" structure out of plain styrene sheet, then after thoroughly checking this for clearance, added the overhang, brickwork and edge flagstones using Slaters textured sheet.








The platforms were then painted, the brickwork is Humbrol acrylic #62 whilst the surfaces are a base coat of Revell Gunship Grey subsequently drybrushed and stippled with at least 6-7 different shades of grey acrylic craft paint! I used a slightly different selection of paints for each of the two stations. Edge flagstones were drybrushed with lighter greys and off-whites, and finally I added an oil wash to highlight the edges and brickwork detail.
The junction station's platform layout is not very prototypical to be honest, but it should look reasonable once buildings, fences and platform furniture have been added. The station building will be at ground level accessing the two platforms via a footbridge; it'll be located where the awkward-looking (and not very practical) curved goods siding currently is, this will be relaid to run behind the platform, giving a longer siding which should be more practical as well as looking less odd!








Further weathering (such as soot) will be added later on once the station buildings, platform "furniture" and fences are in place. The town station's platforms are more conventional in arrangement, but are only modelled at half the length they should be. The "missing" sections will be hidden under the station's train shed and passenger walkway when completed.
Adding the platforms has made a surprisingly large difference to the overall look of the layout - it looks a lot less glaringly unfinished now passenger trains have somewhere to stop at.






This is the beginning of the train shed/overall roof for the main town station. It will be based on the one at Exeter Central station before its rebuild in the 1930s, with two separate peaked roofs, one slightly shorter. The roof section (currently just the frame) is removable to provide access (once the train shed is completed and fixed in place on the layout) for track cleaning + fixing the inevitable derailments - it's held in place with neodymium mini-magnets. The sides of the train shed will be built up into brick retaining walls (the angled one facing the camera is also based on the wall at Exeter Central), and there will be a covered passenger walkway at the scenic divide/tunnel end. (The track visible below is my very small OO gauge layout, stored on the shelf underneath the N gauge one)



I've also made a small start on some of the town buildings. I got a number of Dornaplas terraced house kits in a large lot of building/scenic modelling bits I bought on eBay, and built one into a "complete" model (which will have a fenced garden) and the others into a half-relief street. The other pair of houses on the right I built earlier, they'll go in a different location on the layout (probably at the branch terminus) but give an idea of what the others will look like when finished. The other town buildings will be scratchbuilt and will likely include a pub and some brick warehouses.








Some overall views of the town side. The Christmas trees I made as a joke for my O16.5 narrow gauge layout a couple of years ago - they make quite good large trees in N gauge. They won't be a permanent feature of the layout!



The Black 5 (purchased from forum member "Dr. Al") is my most reliable larger steam loco at the minute, my Minitrix Britannia and 9F still being in need of tweaking to run smoothly. It will be detailed (with handrails, lamp irons etc.), repainted in lined BR black livery, and weathered - eventually! For now it's in its box-stock late LMS livery.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2013, 05:28:22 pm by E Pinniger »

Offline Pengi

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Thanks for posting this - the layout is coming on a treat. Great picture of the Black 5 :thumbsup:
Just one Pendolino, give it to me, a beautiful train, from Italy

Offline Guy

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Looking really good, I enjoy looking at your updates, :)

Offline E Pinniger

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I decided I really needed to get round to assembling a basic set of reliable running and presentable coaches, having previously been running passenger trains made up of an assortment of tatty and derailment-prone stock including the chronically underscale Lima Mk1s! So I went through my box of second-hand coaches, sorted out all the Farish and Minitrix BR Mk.1 coaches in crimson livery, checked the bogies and couplers (replacing the wheels with new metal ones in a couple of cases) and gave them a repaint and weather. You can see the finished result in these photos.





There are three Minitrix, two old Farish (with separate clear insert for the windows) and one new Farish (with the body entirely made in clear plastic). The latter only needed the roof and underframe painting; the others also had their solebars and ends painted, along with detail painting such as stencils and door handles. The Minitrix coaches also had the plastic glazing removed and "flush glazing" added using Kristal Kleer.
The tatty (but a very good runner) Minitrix Ivatt 2-6-0 will also get a repaint and weathering in future!





Finally, all the coaches were weathered using oil washes, drybrushing (on the roof) and weathering powders. I was aiming for a well-used but regularly cleaned look, with the sides relatively devoid of weathering (other than a bit of dust on the lower edge and dirt around the door frames), but the underframes and bogies filthy with grime and brake dust, and the roofs with soot giving them a patchy grey look.



I now have six reliable running and reasonably decent-looking Mk1 coaches, including a GUV and two brake ends. They're not very consistent in colour (in particular, the old Farish ones are a much darker shade) but contemporary colour photos show a lot of colour variation in BR maroon coaches so it doesn't look to odd IMO. I hope to add some "blood and custard", WR brown + cream, and SR green coaches to my collection in the future - I already have a couple each of the first two sorts, not yet repainted/weathered.






Here's a very different coach - the first one I've completed for the light railway branch, painted in its LNWR-inspired livery. It's a Farish "Shredded Wheat" 4-wheel coach with replacement couplers and glazing added using the same "Kristal Kleer" method I used on the Mk1s. Added to this (eventually) will be another ex-Shredded Wheat 4-wheeler, a couple of bogie coaches cut down from old Farish generic suburban coaches, and some more prototypical 4-wheelers built from Ultima/Etched Pixels' kits (when I finally get round to ordering them!)




I've also been working on painting some wagons - here's what I've completed so far: an Insulfish van, standard 12t box van, two 16t steel-bodied mineral wagons and a 7-plank open wagon, all in BR colours. (The brake van is an earlier effort)



The two mineral wagons are Minitrix chassis with the rather overscale bodies replaced by smaller ones from my spares box (no idea where they came from; they were moulded in grey plastic with white stencils. Early Graham Farish?), all the others are Peco kits. They are all painted with acrylics and weathered, the two vans have vacuum pipes made from copper wire, but there's no other added detail.



The 16t mineral wagons are definitely on the shabby side - perhaps too much for the time period represented (late 50s to early 60s), but I was using them to practice weathering and rust painting techniques! I'm planning to make removable loads for these and other open wagons some time in the future.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2013, 05:29:29 pm by E Pinniger »

Offline Newportnobby

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Excellent update, E-P.
The layout is really starting to come to life now :thumbsup:

Offline E Pinniger

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I really need to get round to posting some more updates - I've made a lot of progress on the layout over the last few months, but haven't posted anything for ages. Here are a couple of small additions, I'll post some more interesting things (buildings etc.) once I've sorted out the photos.

>



The tunnels on the junction station side finally have portals - I scratchbuilt these from styrene sheet, using Slaters brick textured sheet on a base of thicker plain sheet. They're based on the portals at either end of Parson's Tunnel near Teignmouth and Dawlish - the somewhat Art Deco-looking one (to go on the right-hand tunnel) is based on the portal at the west end, whilst the more conventional left-hand portal is based on the one at the east end. One side of the right-hand portal had to be cut down a lot to allow it to fit up against the rock retaining wall.











Here are the portals installed and weathered, with scatter material added around the edges and base to blend them in with the scenery. The switches will eventually be hidden by a building!
The "Large Prairie" is a detailed + repainted old Farish loco, I'll post more photos of this soon (and a 94xx Pannier given similar treatment)




I've also done a bit of track relaying. Firstly, I relaid the main goods siding for the junction station. The original track layout was badly thought out - the siding was far too short, and even a single wagon in it would block trains from getting in or out of the engine shed and industry siding. I've now relaid it so that it runs behind the station platform. The latter will only have a small waiting room and a shelter/hut or two, the main station building being at ground level and connected to the platforms via a footbridge - so having a siding running behind it won't obstruct the placement of any buildings.




On the town station side, platform 3 is now a bay platform rather than a loop as originally designed. One of the points for the latter was very unreliable and its location in the "tunnel" made it hard to fix or replace, so I decided this was the best option. The new straight track has room to store a sizeable train without obstructing the main line, so it should be more useful than the original setup. I may extend the island platform as there's now no reason for it to be truncated.
At the same time, I replaced the very dodgy point at the entrance to the goods yard which was regularly causing problems (one of the blades had become detached from the switch moulding and refused to stay in for long when glued back!). I also completed laying the industry spur. Really the point should be the other way where it joins the goods shed line (as it is, only very short trains can use it and a train in the goods shed will block it entirely) but there's no other way it will fit on the baseboard. I probably should have made the industry spur separate from the main goods yard, with a point on the inner main line immediately before the platform 3/goods yard point. I still haven't decided exactly what the industry will be - a small gasworks or a carriage gas production plant (as at Exeter St. Davids) is the most likely possibility. The space between the main line and spur will be occupied by a signal box along with a brick-built water tower and pumping station based on the one at Axminster.



All of the relaid track (both sides!) has now been painted, weathered and ballasted. More photos soon, including some buildings and a couple of detailed + repainted steam locos.

Offline Newportnobby

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Nice work E-P. It's great to see how this is evolving :thumbsup:

 

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