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Author Topic: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout  (Read 733 times)

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Online Globi

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Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« on: October 06, 2018, 08:48:48 am »
Hi all,

Rather than keep posting new threads, I thought I'd just keep updating this thread as my layout progresses.

Proposed scenario: a present day scene in a small town in a hilly part of central/southern Germany, focused around the newly built station on the outskirts. There will be a mix of countryside and town elements. Being a local travel hub, the station has a decent sized bus station adjacent. There will probably be an abandoned signal box from a previous phase of the station's history. After leaving the station, the line enters a short ICE-style tunnel under the town's nearby hill. The station is accessed from a main road (Bahnhoffstrasse) which crosses the layout from left to right, crossing the tracks with bridges.

Track: dead simple, it's just two seperate loops. It's the first time I've done this, so I've a lot to learn! Ballast either grey or light brown. Raised on 2mm cork with shoulder.

Scenery: I want to make the tunnel portals, platforms, fir trees (I've already been busy making these - see pic :)) and deciduous trees by myself from scratch. Will probably use a mix of kits and scratch built for buildings, depending on how things go. I'd love to see some lighting, however that may need to be done as a phase 2 operation.

Measurements: the baseboard is 865mm x 1380mm (9mm ply braced underneath). It's going to be raised up to about 90cm on two pedestals on castors (see attached doodle).

Next thing on the 'to do' list is varnishing the baseboard underside. Not sure if I should do the top? Then I need to construct the pedestals. Wish me luck!  :wave:








Offline Bealman

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2018, 09:07:00 am »
Looking good!  :thumbsup:

Personally, I don't see any point in varnishing either side of the board, unless it's going on a boat!

Just watching trains going round is going to pall pretty quickly though. Some sidings are required to add interest.  :beers:
« Last Edit: October 06, 2018, 09:09:41 am by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Online port perran

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2018, 09:09:59 am »
I’d paint the top surface.
I generally paint grey under the track and green/brown elsewhere. That way any gaps in ballasting won’t show and similarly any gaps in scenery (eg fields etc) won’t show through as bare wood.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Online daffy

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2018, 01:14:56 pm »
You have a nice idea of what you want to acheive scenics wise, but like Bealman I have concerns about you sticking to just two unlinked track loops.
Of course it all depends on whether the scenics are more important to you than the running of trains, but my advice, for what it’s worth, would be to run trains on your current track set up for a while, perhaps placing some temporary scenics like tunnels, stations etc, and see if it holds your interest just to have two trains going round in never decreasing circles.

It would be sad if you built up all the finished quality scenics on the existing track plan only to find the layout of limited pleasure usage.

I’m short, think about ‘playability’. Crossovers, sidings, passing loops, raised track sections and all manner of other possibilities can make for an exciting and interesting layout that I don’t believe two single unconnected loops will have in the long term.

There any many fine small layouts illustrated throughout this forum that show the enormous possibilities. Look at many, take your time in planning, and enjoy the overall experience. And don’t forget to ask a million questions of the many here who have previously tried the path you are on and learnt by their mistakes and experience.

But whatever you build, remember that if you like it then that’s all that matters.

Best of luck with whatever you build, and I look forward to seeing your progress.

 :beers:
Mike

Sufferin' succotash!

Online ntpntpntp

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2018, 02:23:14 pm »
I'm inclined to agree with the comments that perhaps you will get more "fun" out of the end result if you consider just a little more than two separate ovals. Adding a siding or two or a small passing loop just gives you that little bit more to do.  Have a look at the track plan for Noch's "Staufen" preformed layout, a similar size to yours.   Yes it is a bit "train-set" style and uses small points and tight curves, but they've given it some operational interest.

https://media.noch.de/filestore/2/4/6/4_98dcc6132d211e2/2464_6b75ef366baf44a.pdf

Regarding painting/varnishing the board:  don't bother varnishing the top,  better to leave a surface that willl take glue and paint better.  Consider painting the underside white, it makes it much easier to see and work with any wiring etc. 
« Last Edit: October 06, 2018, 05:24:24 pm by ntpntpntp, Reason: typo »
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2018, 03:16:38 pm »
I’m short

Aha - something else we learn about you, Mike :D

Online daffy

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2018, 03:45:24 pm »
I’m short

Aha - something else we learn about you, Mike :D

Typos make the world a better place! :D
Mike

Sufferin' succotash!

Online Globi

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2018, 05:09:10 pm »
You have a nice idea of what you want to acheive scenics wise, but like Bealman I have concerns about you sticking to just two unlinked track loops.
Of course it all depends on whether the scenics are more important to you than the running of trains, but my advice, for what it’s worth, would be to run trains on your current track set up for a while, perhaps placing some temporary scenics like tunnels, stations etc, and see if it holds your interest just to have two trains going round in never decreasing circles.

It would be sad if you built up all the finished quality scenics on the existing track plan only to find the layout of limited pleasure usage.

I’m short, think about ‘playability’. Crossovers, sidings, passing loops, raised track sections and all manner of other possibilities can make for an exciting and interesting layout that I don’t believe two single unconnected loops will have in the long term.

There any many fine small layouts illustrated throughout this forum that show the enormous possibilities. Look at many, take your time in planning, and enjoy the overall experience. And don’t forget to ask a million questions of the many here who have previously tried the path you are on and learnt by their mistakes and experience.

But whatever you build, remember that if you like it then that’s all that matters.

Best of luck with whatever you build, and I look forward to seeing your progress.

 :beers:

I'm so glad I joined this forum! I agree I should set up basic elements and play for a while before gluing anything down. I like the suggested Noch layout, I might make some improvements based on that and similar plans. I love the problem solving aspect in the layout planning, really gets the grey matter activated like nothing else!  :hmmm:

Online Globi

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2018, 08:15:26 pm »
I modified this concept from a Kato layout example - would this work? (I've already purchased the R3 and R3A curves, would prefer to use them).


Online ntpntpntp

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2018, 08:43:40 pm »
Gradients might be a bit steep? 

On the right hand side you're basically expecting the gradient to rise from ground level at the start of the curve and be high enough to cross the other ground level track after little more than a semi circle of track.  What sort of length will that curve be - use a piece a string to roughly measure it, and assume you need to rise by a least 4cm. That will allow you to calculate the gradient. If it's getting more severe than say 1 in 30 then you may struggle. Also remember that a gradient on a curve makes matters worse in terms of drag that the loco will have to overcome.

The gradient on the left is likely to be similar, but the curve is tighter.

You have the curves and the loco, get some scraps of wood and mock up the gradient, see how it looks and how it performs?
« Last Edit: October 06, 2018, 08:46:14 pm by ntpntpntp »
Nick.   2016 celebrating the 20th anniversary of "Königshafen" exhibition layout!

Online Globi

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2018, 08:55:29 am »
Gradients might be a bit steep? 

On the right hand side you're basically expecting the gradient to rise from ground level at the start of the curve and be high enough to cross the other ground level track after little more than a semi circle of track.  What sort of length will that curve be - use a piece a string to roughly measure it, and assume you need to rise by a least 4cm. That will allow you to calculate the gradient. If it's getting more severe than say 1 in 30 then you may struggle. Also remember that a gradient on a curve makes matters worse in terms of drag that the loco will have to overcome.

The gradient on the left is likely to be similar, but the curve is tighter.

You have the curves and the loco, get some scraps of wood and mock up the gradient, see how it looks and how it performs?

I hear you! Will ponder..... :thumbsup:

Online Globi

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2018, 08:56:23 am »
Might play with this concept....


Offline Bealman

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2018, 09:19:48 am »
As suggested earlier, a passing loop is a good idea, as you can park a train there, while another one passes through.

Plus, you can have the locomotive run around it's train, couple at other end,  and head off in the other direction.

It's all about flexibility and not getting bored  :thumbsup: :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Online port perran

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2018, 09:37:26 am »
I think I’d convert Siding 1 into a run round loop (for the reasons put forward by Bealman). Plus, I’d very simply add a 3rd siding coming off of Siding number 2. Perhaps the whole area around Sidings 2and 3 could become a goods yard.
If it looks right then it most probably is right.


Online swisstrains

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Re: Living Room 1:160 DB Layout
« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2018, 10:01:06 am »
Might play with this concept....



I think you're getting somewhere now. :thumbsup: German trains normally run on the right but the addition of the crossover will enable you to have some bi-directional running to gain access to the bay platform at the station. Assuming that the other siding will be some kind of freight facility the crossover will give access from the normal running line (reverse in).When the freight train is shunting on the inner loop a passenger train (either an IC or a local from the bay platform) can be running on the outer loop. Just by adding a couple of sidings and a crossover you have created the potential for many operating scenarios.
As suggested by "port perran" another siding at the freight facility would be good but personally I wouldn't put a lot of importance on the runround loop at the moment as modern German trains tend to be either loco-hauled push/pull or units. In saying this I am assuming that your main interest lies in passenger operations and that the occasional freight working will just give a bit of added interest.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2018, 10:14:51 am by swisstrains »
John

 

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