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Author Topic: Tales from my Stock Box  (Read 3446 times)

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Offline JohnBS

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #60 on: June 20, 2018, 09:43:10 pm »
No. 4706 A Great Western 2-8-0
An essay in scratch-building to 2mm Scale
Based on two articles from "The 2mm Magazine" October & December 1985.


Perhaps like many others, I became attracted to N-gauge modelling by the scenic breadth that the scale offered - the opportunity to put a railway in its context. I immediately rushed in where angels fear to tread and became heavily committed to a large home layout, based loosely on the Totnes area of South Devon. Although I became a member of the 2mm Scale Association and I am most grateful for all the assistance that I have received, the prospect of scrapping all that proprietary track and beginning again in fine-scale was too daunting to contemplate. I therefore continue to model in N-gauge, albeit to 2mm scale.
Over the years, a collection of suitable locomotives had been built up by the well-tried method of modifying commercial models. However, I was running out proprietary mechanisms with suitable dimensions and adequately reliable performance; in addition, the necessary modifications were becoming more extensive and time-consuming. The 2mm Scale Association's London Group locomotive building sessions provided the necessary impetus and guidance for me to take the plunge into scratch-building.
Prototype selection was relatively straightforward; I needed a large goods engine with considerable pulling power. The massive proportions of the 47xx Class 2-8-0s had long been attractive and no suitable commercial chassis was available, or likely. Therefore, despite the problems of beginning with an eight-coupled tender engine, the choice was made.
Russell's well-known work "A Pictorial Record of Great Western Engines" provided the necessary prototype information for the preparation of a general arrangement drawing to 4mm scale (Figure 1 below). There was adequate space for the excellent Portescap 1219 coreless motor to be mounted in the tender, driving through a steel wire cardan shaft to a worm gear mounted in the firebox. Initial sketches showed that a 32:1 worm reduction and a 22:14 spur gear could be accommodated, giving an overall reduction of about 50:1. Also it became clear that the drive could equally be taken to the third or to the fourth axle, so I compromised and did literally that, driving both! The rationale for such a double drive was that it spreads the torque over two axles, reducing the stress on the gear-to-muff and muff-to-axle joints. Also, as the one-piece coupling rods would be held horizontal by the pairs of crankpins, each rod would impart some turning movement to the coupled wheels throughout each revolution. To my pleasure, this turned out to be correct, all the driven axles could be rotated quite sweetly with only one rod in place.


Chassis construction followed well-tried techniques perfected by the Association; metal wheels with integral half axles are fitted in insulated muffs and supported in frames separated from one another with insulated spacers. Clearly, this approach neatly avoids all the decisions of which form of wheel scraper pick-ups to adopt and allows the use of all wheels for electrical contact with no friction penalty.
The frames were made of 0.025" hard brass with 0.020" nickel-silver coupling rods, all sweated together into a four-layer sandwich with the rod blanks on top of the frames. Wheel centres were marked out on the coupling rod centrelines and drilled through all the layers to crankpin diameter - painstakingly in my case with a pin chuck. Then the pair of rod blanks were separated from the frames by a sharp end-on blow with a screwdriver while slightly softening the solder with a warm iron; somewhat nail-biting but it worked.
The rod and frame blanks were then marked out to profile; a black spirit-based marker pen rubbed over the metal prior to scribing greatly increased the visibility of the lines. The tender's inside frames were treated similarly and both set of frames were drilled out to 1.5mm diameter for the axles, fretted and filed to shape, leaving about 10mm extra material at each end to take 10 BA bolts through tubes as temporary spacers to aid assembly. Double-sided copper-clad fibreglass, cut to 5mm overall width and with the copper scribed through longitudinally to provide insulation, was used as frame spacers (note the restricted width between frames in N gauge; 2mm fine scale would give an additional 1.5mm). Initial assembly was by the bolts and tube spacers; when the axle alignment had been checked with 1.5mm rods through the holes, the copper clad fibreglass spacers were tack soldered in place, one by one, rechecking the alignment at each stage. On completion of the soldering, the frame extensions were cut of and the ends filed to shape.
The worm pinion and idler gear, both 0.125" bore to fit on an insulated muff (all obtained from the 2mm Scale Association) were checked for concentricity and then sweated together so that the torque was transmitted directly from gear to gear without relying on the bond to the muff. The latter was trimmed to 4.5mm length to allow some side-play and, with the gears superglued in place, two short lengths of 1.5mm dia steel were inserted through the frames and bonded into the muff to form an insulated idler axle.
I have always found quartering driving wheels to be a particularly awkward and tedious task and was not looking forward to the prospect of tackling four axles, two of which were, in addition, linked by gears.
Firstly four muffs were cut to 4.5m length and drilled mid-way at right angles to allow superglue to be injected. Next a gear was mounted at one end of each of the two muffs for the driven axles. The wheels, obtained from Mike Bryant Models, were prepared by removing any burrs or chuck marks from the axles - otherwise they act as very effective reamers - and by turning down the flanges slightly. Then two pairs were inserted into the third and fourth axle muffs (the ones fitted with the gears) and were quartered by eye, using slotted shim spacers marked with radial lines at right angles to aid sighting. The quartering was then "tweaked" first with one rod in place and then with both until the wheels ran smoothly and the rods did not work against the gears. Superglue was then coaxed into the muff holes with the aid of a pin to lock the quartering and the process was repeated for the second and first axles in turn. In all, it was a lot longer and more frustrating procedure to carry out than to write about.

More to follow,

John

For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #61 on: June 20, 2018, 10:41:50 pm »
Fascinating stuff John, thank you for taking the time to post this. I'm looking forward to reading the next instalment!  :D

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #62 on: June 24, 2018, 08:02:35 pm »
Part 2

Having at last got to the position of a freewheeling chassis, attention moved to the completion of the drive transmission. Firstly the worm was reamed out to be an interference fit on to a length of 1/16" diameter shaft of pivot steel. A bearing of 3/32" outside diameter brass tube, readily obtainable from model shops and a good fit for the pivot steel shaft, was fabricated by soldering a single length of tube through two bent brass angle plates; These in turn were soldered to a stout baseplate of 1/16" nickel-silver cut to 6.0mm width and slotted to clear the worm pinion and idler gear (Figure 2). The baseplate was drilled and tapped 12BA at each end to take mounting screws through frame spacers from underneath. The centre length of the bearing tube was then out to receive the worm, thus ensuring a true alignment of the halves of the bearings.
The worm was located in place and its front face was supported on the vice jaws to enable the shaft to be driven in from the rear without distorting the assembly. Mesh with the worm pinion was adjusted by filing the bottom of the baseplate and the plate was insulated from the frames by a thin layer of self-adhesive tape. A coupling for the wire drive shaft was made by cutting a slot across the diameter of a short length of 3/32" tube and soldering it to the end of the worm shaft to form a keyed socket and then using a push-on sleeve of plastic tube to prevent the end of the wire shaft from slipping out sideways.


The motor was mounted on the tender chassis solely by using stiff wire leads from the split frames to the motor tags at the rear. The motor casing required a layer of self-adhesive tape underneath to prevent shorting across the tender frames or wheel flanges. The turned brass flywheel had an integral coupling socket for the wire drive shaft and, after checking for balance, it was superglued to the motor shaft; inject glue from the front only! The dumbbell-shape steel wire drive shaft completed the drive system. Bending the wire to the correct overall length (about 1mm shorter than the distance between the socket inside faces) was very much a matter of many trials and many errors, however the resulting rejects may come in useful one day for future models!
The physical connection between the locomotive and tender was by a drawbar soldered to the tender and attached to the locomotive chassis by a screw into a tapped plate on the rear spacer. The small amount of side-play necessary was obtained by filing off the threads near to the screw head, thereby reducing its diameter. Electrical connection was by a pair of phosphor-bronze wire springs soldered to the insides of the tender frames and shaped to rub against the insides of the locomotive frames opposite the drawbar screw. This method permits the easy separation of the locomotive and tender and avoids the use of fragile or stiff jump leads, without restricting rotational and pitching movements.
The pony truck was of brass sheet frames and brass milled tee-section bars on a copper-clad spacer. The pivot point was set out by using “Baldry's Rule" as in Roche's book “Building Model Locomotives". Surprise, surprise, Churchward got it right on the prototype!
When it came to the cylinders, I cheated and used a Graham Farish "Hall" set, modified by cutting out a section in the centre to reduce the overall width to scale and reinforcing the join with a plate of brass epoxied underneath. The slide bars were filed to the correct profile and holes were drilled in the block for the piston valves. Slide bar support frames were simply of brass tee-section, shaped and fixed to the footplate. Other details - drain cocks and snifting valves were then added.
The coupling rods were generally made of nickel-silver, detailed by sweating on pieces of oversize shim to form the bosses, drilling through from the back for the crankpins and then filing to shape. The fluted connecting rods were also fabricated from 0.020” nickel-silver and filed to the profile of the web in a pair. After separation, bosses were added as above and the flanges were formed by sweating on strips of nickel-silver shim, again oversize, and filing down to size in place. The crossheads were made from sheet material, again drilled and filed to shape and then soldered to piston rods of appropriate size steel pins. They were then fixed to pivot on the connecting rods on filed-down track pins soldered to a rear retaining plate of shim. Tissue paper between the crosshead and the connecting rod prevented the whole assembly becoming rigid when soldering the pins. The coupling rods were retained temporarily on the crankpins with collars of plastic insulation from electrical wiring until chassis fabrication, testing and painting was complete. They were finally fixed with soldered rings of 5amp fuse wire, again using tissue paper to prevent accidents! The bosses on the rods for the front crankpins were countersunk slightly and the pins filed back to improve crosshead clearances.
The model sports simulated working inside and outside valve gear, perhaps something of a pointless exercise on a locomotive with so little daylight under its massive boiler but a worthwhile experiment and not too difficult. Figure 2 below shows the main details.
The inside fore and back rods were of nickel-silver wire; lengths were bent right round a 2mm diameter former until the shanks crossed over at about 30deg. The crossing point was reinforced by binding with 5amp fuse wire before soldering. Expansion links of nickel-silver sheet were drilled, slotted and cut to the radius shape and then soldered to the gear rod ends, one either side. The extension rods were shaped to profile but were made over-length so that their forward projections could slide backwards and forwards in grooves formed in a plate below the smokebox saddle.
They were then detailed and pivoted to the expansion links. To generate the required movement, a pair of eccentric grooves were simply filed into the second axle muff, set to the correct phasing. A section of the rear part of each gear rod loop was then snipped out so that the rods could be sprung into the grooves. A little tweaking and filing until a good running fit was achieved resulted in a simplified inside motion.
The outside gear operates independently; nickel-silver wire valve spindles were each flattened at one end and bent and soldered to form long closed loops. Fine phosphor-bronze wires were soldered to the backs of the crosshead retaining plates, projecting upwards to engage in these loops and sliding the valve spindles backwards and forwards at the ends of each piston stroke. The wires and rear sections of the loops were chemically blackened to reduce their visibility. The chassis was completed with the addition of brake gear, balance weights of black plastic card, tender water scoop, couplings and other details.

Part 3 to follow,

John
_
For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #63 on: June 26, 2018, 08:41:16 pm »
Part 3

The superstructure is where the story starts to diverge from normal scratch building practice. Having progressed over the years from fairly minor butchery of commercial models to wholesale rebuilds, I had acquired a degree of experience in modifying and building locomotive superstructures from plastic card.
Compared with sheet metal, the usual material, plastic card offers some considerable advantages - principally the ease and speed of cutting, shaping and joining. It is a material with which most modellers are familiar and can use with confidence; in all, it is "user friendly". Of course, the disadvantages are also fairly clear - limited strength and, particularly important to modellers in 2mm scale, low density. However it is capable of being used in thinner sections and with finer details than the average white metal kit and it takes oil-based paints better than any metal. Of course, with a prototype like the 47xx, we are not short of volume to fill with lead so adhesion weight should not be a problem.


Clearly, then, it is important to make the most of the material's attributes and to minimise its shortcomings; a literal translation of sheet metal techniques is likely to be only partially successful. It is vital to begin with basic structures of fairly stout material, typically 0.030" card, with adequate cross-bracing. On to these structural frames, the outer sheets and wrappers, usually 0.010", are fixed. The basic structures can be kept short of the exposed edges of assemblies such as cabs, tender sheets and bunker tops to avoid showing excessively thick edges. Wherever it is necessary to bond large areas of thin sheet on to these structural panels, small vent holes in the underlying material will allow the solvent adhesive to evaporate fully from the centre of the area without softening the thinner sheet. Otherwise irreparable distortions or blisters can develop, sometimes weeks later, as I have found out to my cost! For the same reason it is important that no part of the structure forms an unventilated closed cell.

Figure 3 shows the superstructure components. Black plastic card was used for parts liable to abrasion during handling to camouflage any wearing-away of the dark paint finishes; otherwise white card was used for ease of marking-out. Generally all the main structural components were of 0.030" card, the wrappers and plates of 0.010" and the beading of 0.010" rodding.

Part 4 to follow
For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #64 on: June 26, 2018, 08:48:55 pm »
This is fabulous stuff.

Thank you very much.

Best wishes.

John

'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #65 on: June 27, 2018, 08:28:45 am »
Brilliant John! Thank you so much for sharing the article, it has been really useful. I really can't believe that you've got moving bits for the inside valve gear, incredible - maybe next time the loco needs a service, you could get a picture or two of this!  ;)

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #66 on: June 28, 2018, 01:44:49 pm »
Steve,
Thanks for your comments. As I said in the thread, it was perhaps the most inappropriate choice of prototype for making moving inside motion as the massive boiler made it almost invisible. I guess that it was a case of 'Well, I have this idea so let's try it'. I will try to get a couple of photos soon and post them.
Best wishes,
John
For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #67 on: June 28, 2018, 05:53:20 pm »
Part 4

The main structural element of any small scale model locomotive superstructure, except perhaps tank engines, is the smokebox/boiler/firebox assembly. This forms a rigid cylinder of considerable strength, a backbone which supports footplate, cab and ancillary components. Figure 4 shows the construction of this element and I hope it is largely self-explanatory. 
To retain sufficient flexibility for rolling and to give adequate strength, a double lamination of 0.010" plastic card was used for the smokebox and boiler, formed "swiss-roll" fashion. The developed shapes of the wrappers were derived from the general arrangement drawing using schoolboy mathematics - and a pocket calculator. An allowance for the material thickness was made to the inner layer circumference, effectively a reduction of about 1.5mm from that of the outer layer for 0.010" material, irrespective of the diameter.

The inner layer of the smokebox wrapper projected some 3mm into the front of the coned boiler section to act as a locating plug, the inner layer of the boiler wrapper being cut back by a similar amount. I used old felt pen barrels of suitable diameter as rollers to coax the wrappers into the right curvature and to act as temporary internal formers to hold the sections circular while the adhesive was evaporating and the plastic was hardening - allow at least 24 hours!
The smokebox and boiler sections were filled with rolled lead sheet ballast, carefully shaped so as neither to rattle nor to distort the plastic. I did not want to use any adhesive to avoid the risk of it softening the wrappers. The circular permanent formers, all the internal ones drilled with vent holes, could then be trimmed and fitted. Finally the front and rear planes of the coned boiler were trued up to be perpendicular to the boiler base line and the boiler and smokebox were united.
If a coned boiler can be a bit tricky to get right, then a Belpaire firebox can be the very devil. The geometry is very complex with subtle rearward taper both in plan and in elevation, springing from a parallel-sided base, intersecting curves on the top and front edges and varying curvature to the waist. A careful study of detailed drawings and photographs repays the effort and makes one wonder how they managed to build the prototype ones - and make them work as well!
Figure 4 shows the main components of the model firebox. The top edges of the structural core were rounded before applying the wrapper which was left over-length for trimming to the footplate, in place. After joining to the boiler's rear former and checking for square and level, final shaping was left for a couple of days to allow the adhesive to evaporate and the plastic to harden.
The footplate was relatively straightforward; the main and dropped front end plates were formed from plastic card the thickness of the valance, linked with curved sections and topped with 0.010" black card as the footplate decking. The buffer and drawbar beams were added and the smokebox saddle was made up from two laminations of 0.060" plastic card, filed to shape. The boiler assembly was then mounted, checking carefully for fit, level and parallel. Finally, the boiler support brackets were inserted and the splashers formed from 0.020" discs with black card tops.
A 0.020" transparent plastic card spectacle plate and 0.030" plastic card sides and floor, scribed to represent planking, formed the main cab structure. The black card roof was supported on an inner former, set in from the rear edge. The lower parts of the inner, or structural, side-sheets were projected below the footplate level to form the rear dropped valances; the visible front and side sheets were of 0.010". Finally the steps, of black card reinforced with brackets, were added below the cab footplate.
The tender structure was simple enough in concept, a box with open bottom and with a recess between the tanks for the coal space – or perhaps more precisely for the motor space! However, appearances can be deceptive; the difficult part was to ensure that the planes of the box were set up square and parallel and stayed that way when the adhesive had dried. Small inaccuracies are very noticeable in such a simple rectangular shape.
The plates in the coal space and all the components below footplate level were in black card. The tool boxes, dome and tank filler were laminated and filed to shape before fixing while the main tender wrapper was cut slightly oversize and trimmed down after fixing. The upper coal sheets and the rear flare were spaced on 0.015" sheet and were also filed to finished shape in place.
Generally the details and minor assemblies were of plastic card - principally "lumps" were of thick card, laminated where necessary, plates were of thin card and attached pipes and beading were of appropriate diameter plastic rodding. The backplate, gear lever housing and other cab details were made separately and painted before fixing. Boiler bands and the reinforcing angle around the tender tank base were of self-adhesive tape - the brown sort used for packing, not sellotape which has a tendency to fall off after a few months.
The smaller details were generally of metal - phosphor-bronze wire for handrails with 5amp fuse wire stanchions fixed with superglue, filed down dressmaking pins for tank vents, bent wire and solder for brake and water scoop standards, soldered wire for the smokebox dart and cylinder drain-cocks and nickel-silver shim for the gear rod (operating) and the sanding gear rod (dummy !). The chimney, safety valve casing and whistles were of brass, turned in a mini-drill; no need to use phosphor-bronze for the former as No 4706 did not boast of a copper capuchon! 2mm Scale Association tender axle-box castings and proprietary turned buffers and wound wire vacuum hoses completed the details.
The paint scheme for No 4706 was suitably austere - luckily; no lining and very little bright metal to worry about. The chassis was painted before the final fixing of the side rods. I used scouring powder and an old toothbrush for cleaning the metal, then, after washing down thoroughly, the wheel treads and flanges were masked with two coats of dilute PVA glue and the gears masked with tape. The chassis was then primed grey and finished matt black using aerosol car paints. On the superstructure the only areas which required masking were the spectacle plate windows (inside and outside) before spraying the whole with Precision Paint's pre-1928 green (I like the colour better than the later green!) and brush-painting the black areas, the red buffer beams and not forgetting the red of the inside frames and motion.
Before their final fixing, the coupling and connecting rods were chemically blackened, lightly burnished with a fibre-glass brush and then smeared with a film of Teflon grease; this process gives a realistic and permanent impression of slightly rusted oily metal.
Weathering was concentrated on the wheels, chassis, other areas below footplate level and on the tender interior, using dilute black and rust oil paints and finished off by dry brushing with lighter shades. After applying Methfix transfers and etched number plates, the whole superstructure was sprayed with semi-matt varnish as a final finish. The cab fittings, crew and tender coal load completed the model.
Now came the proof of the pudding. On the tracks No 4706 pulled as well as I had hoped - forty plus wagons up the 1 in 25 gradients on the 450mm radius hidden curves of my then "Totnes" were no problem. Low speed running was equally satisfying, a scale 5 mph could be sustained through hell or high water. Still, with 14 wheels to choose from, current collection should not have been a major problem and the superb performance of the Portescap motor at low voltages is well known. At a scale 50 mph, the model's maximum speed was perhaps a little on the slow side for use on an excursion passenger link but it was fine for the more common fitted goods traffic. The rubbing electrical contact between locomotive and tender has showed no sign of causing current connection problems but I wouldn’t like to try it without tender pick-ups. Inevitably, the long coupled wheelbase, without compensation, (food for thought in 2mm scale) gave rise to some slipping at any sharp changes of vertical alignment; perhaps a little more vertical play on the pony truck override bumper would reduce the problem.
Well, with the benefit of hindsight, what would I have done differently? As it turns out, relatively little except for a few significant points.
Firstly, a keeper plate to allow the removal of the driving axles would have been invaluable for wheel quartering, worm meshing and painting and would have reduced the risk of disturbing the quartering during later stages of the chassis construction. Even the relatively low temperature reached by an axle when soldering nearby areas of the frames can be sufficient to break the bond of the superglue in the muff.
Secondly a technique used by Denys Brownlee would have simplified the installation of the idler gear axle. He used insulated bushes of carbon- or mica-filled PTFE, drilled and turned in the lathe and mounted in the frames to support simple steel idler shafts. This avoids the need for, either a split axle and muff-mounted gear, both increasing the risk of eccentricity, or the construction of a complex subsidiary frame, insulated from the main frames. Perhaps I only got away with it because 64DP gears are reasonably tolerant of poor meshing and a degree of eccentricity.
Finally, a method used by John Greenwood would have avoided the ever-present risk of losing the cardan shaft when lifting the loco. He anchors the front end of the shaft by drilling a transverse hole through the worm shaft sleeve and forms the front loop of the shaft to fit through this, thus holding the shaft captive at one end, while still allowing the necessary movement.

Well, that's the end of this story,

John

©   John Birkett-Smith
March 1985, June 2018

For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #68 on: July 01, 2018, 08:28:07 pm »
Can't wait to see what comes next???

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #69 on: July 02, 2018, 08:54:42 pm »
Graham,
Nothing new in Tales from my Stock Box at the moment but a couple of things are brewing.
Perhaps you might like to look at my recent posting under the Layout Construction heading - Ashburton and Totnes.
Best wishes,
John
For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #70 on: July 10, 2018, 08:20:30 pm »
Tales from my Stock Box

. . . and  now for something completely different . . . From the sublime, in the forms of The Great Bear and the massive 47xx, to the (not quite) ridiculous - the Peckett 0-4-0.



Peckett 0-4-0ST 14in, Works No. 1465  c. 1930
Ex Hafodyrynys Colliery
Built 1917 Withdrawn 1956


This locomotive was made from a long-discontinued Peco white metal kit fitted on an Arnold 0-4-0 chassis, both of which had been skulking around in my 'to do one day' box.

I decided that I needed a freelance privately owned loco to work the Totnes Quay branch, which at the moment, is not operational. In reality, the section on The Plains was horse operated but, in 2mm scale, you have to draw the line somewhere! The intention is to have it working, either on an automatic shuttle basis or by a separate control panel that can be plugged into the front of the layout, so that I can have something not too demanding to do while I chat with the public.

The original kit was nicely mastered and cast but there are a couple of problems. Firstly as others have mentioned, is somewhat over-scale to accommodate the Arnold mechanism. There is not a lot that can be done about that, short of using a different kit and chassis, but it doesn't look too bad if you can keep it at some distance from other locomotives. Secondly, it is an 0-4-0 so precious little pick-up is available, particularly as I wanted it to be capable of shunting and slow speed running. This I decided could be mitigated by maximising the adhesion weight and by having a permanently-coupled, and electrically-connected, shunters truck.

Out of the box, the loco and mechanism weighed 45g but I managed to pack-in an extra 15g of lead, giving a reasonable total weight of 60g.

The shunters' truck was made out of a short wheelbase Peco brake van under-frame which provided me with a chassis with robust running boards. I packed some sheet lead between the frames, then, below, a layer of double-sided copper-clad fibreglass to anchor phosphor-bronze wipers contacting the backs of solid disc wheels - near the centre to minimise friction. Then, on top, went a scribed plastic card floor and a tool box filled with lead. Connection to the loco is by nickel-silver shims soldered to the top and bottom layers of the copper-clad (left wheels to bottom surface, right to top), rubbing on a copper-clad draw-bar, hard wired to the loco. The truck weighed a respectable 15g and, in terms of electrical pick-up, I now have an 0-4-4-0 and a total combined weight of 75g. Slow running seems quite acceptable.

Nothing much more to say. Wire handrails were fitted and turned brass safety valves and whistle. All was primed with a grey rattle can, the loco was then air brush painted and lined with Fox decals, to a freelance scheme. The truck was merely left in primer grey, with timber areas and handrails brush painted and finally, everything was weathered.

Don't hold your breath for the next posting in this thread.

John

For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

Offline JohnBS

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #71 on: July 12, 2018, 09:15:42 pm »
Steve, et al,
More on the 47xx



Here's a photo of the underside of 4706, which shows something of the imitation inside valve gear. You can just about pick out the eccentric grooves filed into the second driving wheel muff.



Also I photographed the other (right hand) side of the monster, which just goes to show how invisible the valve gear is!
When I take the loco to bits for a thorough clean, I'll see if I can take a couple more pix.
Best wishes,
John

For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

Offline Dr Al

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #72 on: July 13, 2018, 12:27:30 am »
This is truly exquisite engineering - not just modelling, but miniature engineering.

Cheers,
Alan
Quote from: Roy L S
If Dr Al is online he may be able to provide a more comprehensive answer.

Offline JohnBS

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #73 on: July 15, 2018, 09:19:55 pm »
Well, perhaps not quite from my Stock Box! In reality, she lives in her own box file.

Clyde Puffer "Starlight" c.1935
Registered in Glasgow 
Built 1929, scrapped 1953




"Starlight" at Totnes quayside is at the southern extremity of her range. Times were hard then so she was loaded with a cargo of timber baulks from Forestry Commission plantations in Scotland for J & R Reeves & Co Ltd, timber importers. When unloading is complete, she is due to call at Par to pick up a return cargo of china clay.



The model was from a Langley kit; the major components in resin with white metal details. The hull was cut down to waterline and the hold was drilled and ground out, with a floor of 60 thou plastic card. Various details were added - etched handrails, plastic card hatch coaming, boards and canvas (tissue paper), ladder and companionway, dinghy with thwarts and oars, stays (wire) and rigging (cotton), flag (painted tissue paper), navigation lights and crew. The cargo of timber was made from large matchsticks.

Perhaps another ship may enter harbour soon.

John
For more information see my blog: http://ashburton-and-totnes.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Tales from my Stock Box
« Reply #74 on: July 15, 2018, 09:58:23 pm »
Lovely: just like the Vital Spark of many happy memories.  "More steam MacPhail!"
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

 

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