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Author Topic: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?  (Read 938 times)

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Offline Calyw

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2018, 04:24:15 pm »
I have several isolated sections in both the N gauge standard part of the track and also the N-6.5 section (Using Peco Z gauge track) and the best method I have found is to lay the track and ballast it so that it's firmly in place and then use the Dremel with a dental cutoff disc (very thin) to cut the track.  If you ask your nearest Dental Technician he will probably sell you a couple.  They are a bit more brittle than the standard Dremel ones so a steady hand is needed.

Offline Old Crow

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2018, 03:59:40 pm »
Yes! I agree about Peco IRJ's because, as a newbie, some of my flexi curves are under stress and prone to move. Cutting the rail with a very fine razor saw in my case and fitting small plastic patches works for me.

Offline Caz

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2018, 04:02:16 pm »
I've started to use the more rigid Fleischmann IRJ's, they hold the track in line much better.

Offline Jonathan Prince

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2018, 04:08:07 pm »
Yes! I agree about Peco IRJ's because, as a newbie, some of my flexi curves are under stress and prone to move. Cutting the rail with a very fine razor saw in my case and fitting small plastic patches works for me.
Do you find that cutting the rail on a curved piece of flexitrack causes it to dogleg noticeably? I'm thinking of making a cut on one of the less sharp curves but I'm worried both ends will pull apart, or are the sleeper chairs strong enough?

Offline Old Crow

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2018, 04:51:57 pm »
Flexi-track - and I'm using code 80, is prone to coming apart given the chance.
IRJ's can work and are ok on most bits. If making cuts, there is no reason why the cut has to be right at the junction with the point - you could use a standard rail joiner (I'd done this before realising I needed to isolate the points in one or two cases.) Equally there is no actual reason why the cuts have to be exactly opposite. I choose an area that looks strong enough, either a little way beyond the join - or even on the point itself.  My preference is for a fine razor saw, with the blade reversed so it cuts on the pull stroke. A Dremel or similar with a cutting disc is easy but I found you have to be exactly vertical to avoid a slanted or widened cut. I make a cut of say 1mm and superglue in a piece of plasticard strip that is easy to file to a matching profile.

Offline Caz

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #20 on: March 12, 2018, 04:56:34 pm »
Where I have a join on a curve using flexi I put a track pin or two either side of the cut to stop the track dog-legging.  One ballasted you can't see them.

Offline Old Crow

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #21 on: March 14, 2018, 01:11:06 am »
Good idea Caz! I'm a "pinner" anyway and use the peco fine steel pins after drilling with a very fine drill. as you say, they don't show on wooden sleepers.

Offline Zogbert Splod

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2018, 09:18:02 pm »
...A Dremel or similar with a cutting disc is easy but I found you have to be exactly vertical to avoid a slanted or widened cut. I make a cut of say 1mm and superglue in a piece of plasticard strip that is easy to file to a matching profile.
I've tried this.  The problem is that the relative diameters of the body of the tool and disk make a slanted cut almost impossible to avoid.  Then :idea: on came the light.  I remembered that i had a couple of Dremel flexible drives.  The handle piece of these is substantially less in diameter than is the body of the Dremel itself...   Job done!!!
"When in trouble, when in doubt, run (trains) in circles..." etc.
There, doesn't that feel better? 
Lovely!

Planning thread:
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=25873.0

My website: Zog Trains

Run what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law
I may appear to be listening to you, but inside my head, I'm playing with my trains.

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Insulated fishplates or gaps in the rail?
« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2018, 09:53:57 pm »
I'm almost scared to use a Dremel type tool as I'm a Frank Herbert 'Dune' fan and always remember "May your blade chip and shatter" :worried:
Therefore I tend to use a pair of Xuron track cutters which make a very fine cut but the handles are at a crank to the blades so, again, you have to be careful to make a vertical cut.

 

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