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Author Topic: wagons...choices  (Read 478 times)

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Offline Intercity

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wagons...choices
« on: January 02, 2018, 11:16:45 pm »
I am about to start filling out the rolling stock library with some wagons, however I have a couple of questions first.

Farish have HAAs and HEAs, am I right in thinking both transported coal? but the HAA was for Merry Go Round service and HEAs didn't have that capability?

The MBAs are the Megabox bogie wagons, did these only operate in formations solely comprised of MBAs?

OCAs are the 31 tonne dropside wagons, are these ideal for a civil engineers train (which other wagons would be found in these consists?

as for Dapol, the silver bullets are nice but what service were they used for?

Grampus wagons are freely available, what sort of use did they see?

JNAs and IOAs are really nice looking, are these mixed in with other wagons and would I only see them on ballast workings?

I remember there were others I would see in various sidings but don't really remember the details, guessing lengths varied by work intended to be done (but what would be typical for a model layout)

I am modeling early 90s through to the 2000s with large amounts of rule one.

IC
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Offline bridgiesimon

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 11:24:07 pm »
HBA/HEA wagons were designed for shorter and domestic coal flows not power stations as you mention, some also used for calcified seaweed in Cornwall if I remember correctly!
OCAs not only engineers but for general goods as well, many used for military stuff as well, I have seen wagons like these used for landrovers etc somewhere.

Silver Bullets are for china clay slurry and mainly ran in block rkes but could be seen individually and in pairs etc in mixed freight trains as well.

Grampus are engineers wagons, used for ballast mainly.
no idea on the JNA and IOA but piccies seem to suggest formations of one wagon type, am sure others will confirm either way.

Hope this is a start.

Best wishes
Simon

Offline Arrachogaidh

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 11:28:30 pm »
Silver Bullets run up to Aberdeen with some type of slurry for the oil industry.

MBA's see here http://www.ltsv.com/w_profile_015.php

After experimenting with various types of ballast wagons, British Railways standardised on  the 20 Ton 'Grampus', a steel bodied wagon 21' 6" over headstocks with a 12' 0" wheelbase, drop sides and ends, developed from the GWR 'Tunney'. A total of 4, 781 were built over 11 years from 1951 - 4,059 to Dia.1/572 of which all but the Ashford built wagons of Lot 3245 were non-fitted, and 722 vacuum braked wagons to Dia.1/574. The last surviving vacuum braked examples were phased out around the turn of the century.

ē The 'Grampus' was not just used for ballast, but a whole range of Engineer's materials, tools and plant.

ē Many were later converted for other uses such as continuous welded rail trains, or seen on specific duties (i.e.; Taunton Concrete works), and they were also to be seen carrying 'normal' traffic such as loco coal or agricultural machinery from time-to-time.

ē The removable ends could be stowed in baskets fitted underneath the wagon, and the ends dropped to allow cranes and small mechanical shovels to easily move up and down a train to offload ballast or sleepers on site.

ē Livery from new was all-over black with straw lettering - the short lived 'Gulf Red' was applied to some wagons between 1960 and 1963, when Olive Green was introduced.

ē Around 1966/67 a colour coding system for Departmental wagons was introduced and many 'Grampus' wagons were to be seen wearing a green triangular patch at the upper left-hand end of the bodywork, although I've yet to see anything in print fully explaining this system.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 11:32:01 pm by Arrachogaidh »
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Online Snowwolflair

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 11:35:25 pm »
Silver Bullets run up to Aberdeen with some type of slurry for the oil industry.



Drilling mud

"In geotechnical engineering, drilling fluid is used to aid the drilling of boreholes into the earth. Often used while drilling oil and natural gas wells and on exploration drilling rigs,"

Offline bluedepot

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2018, 01:53:31 am »
Where is this rolling stock library?

HAA bottom discharging and done mechanically at the power station

I think some used for gypsum too

Some HEA later used for scrap metal and coded HSA

Some HEA used for gravel more recently


Tim

Online njee20

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2018, 08:31:54 am »
If you model present day (or last 10 years), which I think you do... then HEAs and to an extent HAAs are a bit out of date. More common were HTA (EWS) and HHA (Freightliner) for coal traffic, both bogie wagons.

MBAs tend to be homogeneous rakes, MOAs, the low sided versions are more mixed up. IOAs are used in homogeneous rakes, whilst JNAs are mixed, often used with MOAs.

Silver Bullets are lovely models, particularly the weathered ones.

Obvious missing ones are some Intermodal wagons, which is what dominates the WCML freight traffic. FEAs (GBRF/Freightliner), IKAs (FL/DRS/EWS), FIAs (EWS) all spring to mind. Mixed up within each operatorís stock, and available from Dapol/Dapol/Farish respectively. 

Offline Buzzard

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2018, 09:01:55 am »
I think some used for gypsum too

The gypsum ones that used to run on the Southern were HAA lookalikes in that

they were built to the pre-1986 Hastings line gauge
they had different discharge mechanisms and
were coded PGA

Offline Intercity

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2018, 07:39:57 pm »
thanks for the replies, looks like HEAs and Grampus may be used to fill out the yard and a rake of HAAs for the 56, and various bogie wagons for other rakes to run around the layout. next question

brake vans, what were they used on? i recall seeing them but they were just "there" never thought about why, I never thought about unfitted freights, what sort of trains ran over the mainline unfitted (HAAs had continuous/train braking and didn't need brake vans?), were there restrictions on what did and didn't need a brakevan?
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Offline GScaleBruce

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Re: wagons...choices
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2018, 10:55:13 pm »
With few exceptions, you only need a brake van if the freight train is not fitted with a continuous air or vacuum brake. You're modelling early 90s to 2000s, by which time unfitted trains only operated under special permission. In simple model terms, if the train is made up of wagons with a description ending in an A, then it'll be fully air baked (a rake of HAAs,  a mixed Speedlink service of OBAs, VBAs,  etc...). If they all end in a V, then they're all vacuum braked, so again no brake van needed. If it's a mix, you'll need a brake van as the two systems are incompatible and part of the train at least wouldn't have a continuous brake operational. Brake vans were often used on engineering trains because the locomotive might be detached during engineering works with a portion of the train parked on the track. A brake van ensures that if and when the air or vacuum brake leaks off, the wagons will be held in place by the brake van.
Bruce
My layout - Steinheim am Main

 

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