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Author Topic: Planning an incline.  (Read 1713 times)

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Offline Old Crow

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Re: Planning an incline.
« Reply #30 on: November 06, 2017, 10:35:47 pm »
Interesting guys. I must get on with some experiments. I concur that it's friction on the curves - and the tighter, the more of it! I also had "bouncing" set-track running a test oval. What about inertia - having a good run at it? I can get a straight run of 3 feet plus , a curve of 11.75" (radius 3) and a straight run of at least four feet! That's getting on for 10 feet and the minimum clearance height I need is 50mm! Most likely the trains visiting the upper level will be local 3-coach specials powered by a 2-6-4 tank. My Duchesses can really move and it would be nice to get five Mk 1 coaches up the hill. 
Test track is a 3" wide strip of thick ply 5 ft 6" long to which I'll fit some flexi-track. We will be starting from a standing start though!!!! I did a half scale drawing of 2% incline - it really is a very small angle. Strip is 167mm, so 2% or 1 in 50 should (theoretically) give 30mm? From a standing start I dunno though? At least it will show where slipping starts.

Offline Webbo

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Re: Planning an incline.
« Reply #31 on: November 06, 2017, 10:50:08 pm »
True enough on some of what you say, Tony

However, the treads on real (and model) railway wheels are cambered to counter the slippage effect (and to minimise the flanges scraping along the inside of the rail). As the wheels negotiate the curve the axle and wheels move sideways a little and ride up on the camber. The net effect is that the wheel on the outside of the curve has a slightly larger diameter of contact than the inner wheel so both wheels can go round the curve without slipping. So I don't buy the slippage effect just yet.

As for the other effect of flanges scraping along the sides of rails on sharp curves - yes, seems reasonable, but how big an effect is it really? If this is a significant effect, it seems to me that it would manifest itself quite differently on a bogie coach versus on a 4-wheeled wagon.

We need some testing as Old Crow is going to do..

Webbo

Offline LAandNQFan

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Re: Planning an incline.
« Reply #32 on: November 07, 2017, 12:20:58 am »
Have people managed to successfully create inclines that curve and if so what limitations are there (I also see limits on what can pull a full consist but that’s what the low and slow lines are for)

If you have a look at http://youtu.be/-Keo4QCXpvI you'll see a pannier and a UM loco negotiating 9" radius curves at 3%-4%.
Perhaps the proof that there is intelligent life in outer space is that they haven't contacted us.
Layout thread: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=23416

Offline Old Crow

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Re: Planning an incline.
« Reply #33 on: November 07, 2017, 12:35:54 am »
Interesting vid. Locos ran well; nice bumpy route - but I'm facing a long drag. I've noticed my older Jinty's are reasonable pullers. I'm a fan of heavier older locos made of iron. Traction = weight on the track. Less detail? Well, if one is going for close, realistic photography I can see that but my viewing distance in "N" scale works out at about 30 yards (I'm still in old money) so how much would you actually see?
Quite interested in a Union Mills loco I've seen used - tender drive I see.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 12:44:08 am by Old Crow »

Offline Yet_Another

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Re: Planning an incline.
« Reply #34 on: November 07, 2017, 06:42:59 pm »

We need some testing as Old Crow is going to do..

Webbo
I think they will all contribute, but I have no idea of the magnitude of any. I was just pointing out that these things are there. We're all whistling in the dark without any consistent data, so bring on the testing!  :thumbsup:
Tony

'...things are not done by those who sit down to count the cost of every thought and act.' - Sir Daniel Gooch of IKB

 

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