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Author Topic: Wrenton  (Read 53259 times)

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Online rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #495 on: January 25, 2018, 10:29:04 pm »
Hi Rodger, I have received my NGS magazine today, and there is a article on weathering coach roofs using salt, looks very good, worth a look.

Yes Chris, I noticed that article straight away - wonder why?! I think the technique might be overdoing it a bit for my layout, comparing the results with the other effects I'm getting, but I'd like to try it one day.

There was an article using much the same method in Model Rail last September, admittedly demonstrating it with a 00 gauge model. And one of the books suggested by Bill (post#466), Weathering Rolling Stock by Tim Shackleton, uses the method to achieve rust effects on mineral wagons. I did wonder whether to try it on mine, but finally went for simpler methods.

Offline lil chris

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #496 on: January 25, 2018, 11:02:10 pm »
Hi again Roger, sorry I spelt your name wrong before. I have seen the technique used on wagons for rust effect like you say, might be a bit much for N-Gauge. I have a couple of good book's on paintinng with a airbrush and weathering by George Dent which are very good, I have also seen Tim Shackleton's work which is also very good.
Lil Chris
My layout here East Lancashire Lines
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=29492.0

Offline w greatbatch

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #497 on: January 25, 2018, 11:30:31 pm »


Just posted a Youtube  video on the Facebook forum,weathering 20 ton hoppers,it works on mineral wagons too !       

Regards     Bill

Online rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #498 on: January 26, 2018, 11:15:07 am »
Hi again Roger, sorry I spelt your name wrong before.

No problem. Might not be many years before I can't spell it either!

I have a couple of good book's on paintinng with a airbrush and weathering by George Dent which are very good.

I have his airbrushing book, bought when I was trying to decide whether to buy a brush. It hasn't yet persuaded me to part company with my cash but time will tell.

Offline Bealman

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #499 on: January 26, 2018, 11:26:06 am »
I stand in awe of folks who  can use an airbrush.

For some reason I always think of graffiti.

To use one in N scale would take some skill, I reckon.

However, we have several threads here with success stories and hints and tips.  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Offline wookie

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #500 on: January 26, 2018, 03:08:54 pm »
Having to clean everything so thoroughly each time, plus the need to thin the paint (scary) has put me off....

Online rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #501 on: January 26, 2018, 10:35:48 pm »
I stand in awe of folks who  can use an airbrush.

Me too. I reckon it would take a lot of practice before I risked weathering an expensive model with one.

Having to clean everything so thoroughly each time, plus the need to thin the paint (scary) has put me off....

Glad I'm not the only one!

I can put coal in tenders, though. Bittern finds itself on the wrong road as it poses beside Flying Scotsman. The coal was added on top of the existing moulded version.


Offline keithbythe sea

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #502 on: January 27, 2018, 08:04:04 pm »
Nice touch Roger. Simple and very effective.  :thumbsup:

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #503 on: January 28, 2018, 10:49:26 pm »
While Bittern and Flying Scotsman were side by side I just had to lower the camera for this view. Wish I had a four-track mainline!


Offline Bealman

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #504 on: January 28, 2018, 10:59:43 pm »
Great photo!  :thumbsup:

Reminds me of when 4472 was in Australia during the late eighties.  :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #505 on: January 30, 2018, 11:14:37 pm »
More 4472. You may have noticed in my last post that I've taken a brush to the teak coaches. I wouldn't dare touch the sides and it would be easy to spoil the roofs. So it's just the chassis and bogies that have had some grey applied to take the edge off the shiny black plastic.





A little after-thought. Were the coaches' buffers really that colour? Did the LNER paint them to look like teak?
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 11:16:40 pm by rogerdB »

Offline tutenkhamunsleeping

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #506 on: January 30, 2018, 11:24:05 pm »
I think the coaches look much better for the lightly weathered underparts :thumbsup:

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #507 on: January 31, 2018, 06:34:53 am »
A little after-thought. Were the coaches' buffers really that colour? Did the LNER paint them to look like teak?
In my recollection, if they did, it would not have lasted very long because during shunting and under breaking the buffers often clashed and bare metal would have soon been the result.  All the buffers I remember seeing were bare metal, but perhaps with some weathering around the edges.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Offline w greatbatch

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #508 on: January 31, 2018, 07:58:46 am »
Brilliant pic's, love 'em. :claphappy:

Offline Train Waiting

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #509 on: January 31, 2018, 08:21:58 am »
A little after-thought. Were the coaches' buffers really that colour? Did the LNER paint them to look like teak?


Marvellous photographs, Roger.  I understand that the solebars, headstocks, wheel centres and buffer shanks were painted 'imitation teak'.  If the buffer heads were so painted it would have been bashed off as the carriage was shunted into a formation.

They buffers ought not to have clashed in normal service as these carriages were 'buck-eye' fitted.  I suppose the answer would be to paint the buffer heads a weathered grey-brown.

Here are some particularly nice pictures which might help a little.

http://www.steve-banks.org/prototype-and-traffic/133-teak-coaches

Thank you for all the wonderful pictures that you post.  I really enjoy seeing them.

With best wishes.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

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