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Author Topic: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge  (Read 26979 times)

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #465 on: March 12, 2018, 03:32:37 pm »
John. I thnk you are corect about scenic goods  yards. I hold my hands up - my own two goods yards do indeed lay undisturbed. I have little interest in shunting but, as I have created a scenic layout, I feel I need a readonably prototypical goods yard.
For your train set concept however I feel that you have license to be creative.
Cannot the two goods sidings be loops to allow trains to be stored - even goods loops (allowing goods trains to let important passenger trains pass) with the addition of goods loading/unloading facilities?
Or am I misteading the situation or complicating it perhaps?
Just my musings.
Martin


Many thanks for this, Martin.  The two sidings form a typical small station goods yard and I don't think that it would be practicable to convert them to loops.

The '3F' 0-6-0 No. 3214 is in the 'Goods Shed Siding' with a train of 'nine plus brake van'.  Goods shed still to be built!

The 'Back Loops' are at the other side of the layout and were designed to allow for a large locomotive and four carriages:-



My original plan was to have four trains for the main line part of the layout and one for the branch line.  Using the goods yard, to a certain extent, as a scenic staging yard allows for five trains to be available for service on the main line and maintains the appearance of a typical goods yard.  As you say, this is an important feature of a scenic layout.

And it was a scenic feature that caused the problem; for a station in the former NER territory, the coal facilities would be 'coal cells'.  So typical of the NER and uncommon, but certainly not unheard of, elsewhere.  I don't fancy backing a 'full length' goods train up the gradient to the coal cells so it was looking like a level coal siding.  This would have been wrong for the NER and, therefore, could the layout be, on certain running days, Brawton, Junction for Darrowby?  Brian hinted that I ought to think some more and I have been!

All the very best.

John 
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #466 on: March 12, 2018, 04:03:03 pm »
Good News - The 'James Herriot Characters' can Remain!

The grey matter has been called into service, as Brian suggested, and a solution has been found.  On certain running days the station can still be Brawton, Junction for Darrowby.  I'm delighted at this because the Herriot characters are such good fun.

Here's how:

I thought about Mr Goodall's words (below); I am not building a model railway which is a replica of a particular station, but I want a train set layout which is railway-like.  'Borrow from reality' as he expressed it.  The branch line platform arrangement is very loosely based on Alne.  I then had another look at my diagram for Alne, in double track days, to see what the goods yard arrangement was like.  And then I noticed it... there were two yards; a 'normal' goods yard by the station and the coal cells further south, with a connection off what looks like a Down Loop.  There also appeared to be an Up Loop (unfortunately the diagram does not go far enough south to establish that these are loops, but is unlikely that the NER would have an Up siding with a facing point.  So, in the absence of any other available evidence, I'll go for two loops south of the station.

That was it!  The coal cells for the layout could be off the Up Loop rather than in the goods yard.  I immediately installed another turnout and mocked up the rest:-


Coal cells were, I understand, about 10 feet high, so a 10mm rise on the track and the 'Sundeala' cut away will give 20mm - tickety-boo!

With the additional turnout in place, will a standard length goods train of 'Nine and Brake Van' clear the shortened loop?



Yes!  I've been lucky today.

Many thanks for looking and special thanks to Brian and Martin for their encouragement.

Toodle-oo.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #467 on: March 12, 2018, 05:10:20 pm »
Good news.
Looking forward to the progress.
It's you railway so build it as you want and run whatever you like. The only rule is - ENJOY :
My Layouts -
Port Perran:- Trepol Bay:-

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #468 on: March 12, 2018, 08:35:10 pm »
Great :thumbsup: I'm glad you've got it solved. Looking forward to seeing the coal drops.
You know you're getting older when your mind makes commitments your body can't meet.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #469 on: March 13, 2018, 11:48:22 pm »
 :hellosign: Glad all is sorted to your satisfaction John, I also am definetly in the visible yard/ sidings camp. Looking forward to developments
    regards Derek.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #470 on: March 18, 2018, 08:39:19 pm »
A Brief Diversion

I have occasionally mentioned Sandrock, my US 'N Scale' layout on which progress stalled when I discovered Union Mills.  I knew for many years that I liked 'N Gauge' and British railways, but previous efforts at combining these had not been happy.  I found out about Kato US models about nine years ago and these were a revelation.  I quickly decided that I could have fun with 'N', just not British 'N Gauge'.

Over the past year Sandrock had become a depository for things and stuff, and an adventure playground for Poppy.  My plans for today were snowed off so, in a moment of enthusiasm, I cleared the front half of Sandrock and enough of the hidden staging to have the Eastbound Track clear.  And, for the first time in goodness knows how long, ran a short train!
 


Sandrock, a US 'N Scale', mostly Kato, layout featuring the AT&SF with far too much 'Uncle Pete'. Sandrock was pinched from the 1946 film, The Harvey Girls, with its great song 'On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe'.

Here's the train running:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/l47sfwfpc4b2m11/Sandrock%201.MOV?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/gj2njr6n7itl5xy/Sandrock%202.MOV?dl=0

As I said, a brief diversion.  Back to Blighty next time and, hopefully, steam locomotives*.
 
Many thanks for looking.

All the best.

John

*AT&SF steam locomotives were particularly good, but water was a problem in the South-West and the railway dieselized with enthusiasm.



'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #471 on: March 19, 2018, 06:58:57 am »
Great diversion John  :thankyousign:

I hear excellent things about Kato locos, maybe my next layout will be US themed!

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #472 on: March 20, 2018, 09:36:28 pm »
Back to British Steam and a Bit of Bother

My plan to use the goods yard as a scenic staging yard has enabled the two yard sidings to be used to hold a couple of goods trains which can go out for a run around the layout whenever I like.  After this they stop beyond the trailing turnout to the yard and then reverse into the yard.  Then LMS '3F' 0-6-0 No. 3214 put its rear tender wheels on the ballast.  Oh, bother!
 


[A Union Mills '3F' has come a cropper on a Kato #6 turnout - time to investigate!]

I have tried to avoid facing points on the layout unless necessary.  The back loops have one on each of the Up and Down lines in order to gain access to the loops.  These facing points have a 45mm straight track between them and the curve that comes before, as a facing point immediately following a curve caused problems during testing.  Even this was not enough in all instances and I created 'joggles' in the stock rails to house the switch.  This did the trick.

But here's the obvious - a trailing point becomes a facing point during a reversing movement!  And in order to allow the maximum length for the Up platform, I did not include a 45mm straight track between the yard turnout and the curve.  I did not think that the goods yard would see much traffic and was willing to accept the compromise.  But with the frequent use that the yard will now see, a solution was required.

I was very reluctant to lift the ballasted track to file the housing in the stock rail that I have previously loosely described as a joggle.  It was best done in situ and that was a job for the ancient mini-drill and a worryingly dentist-looking implement.



Incidentally, No. 3214 never derailed on the points in the yard, only on the points leading to the yard, which come immediately after a curve when running in reverse.  The points in the yard appear to have sufficient straight track beforehand to prevent derailments.



In the very unlikely event that any of these ramblings are of interest or use to a fellow Forum member, the amount of the rail head that one wants to file or otherwise cut away is about the amount to the right of the rule:-



It's much easier to show this on a bigger scale!

No. 3214 is now happy reversing into the yard and I'm enjoying having five trains available for service on the layout.

Many thanks for looking.

Toodle-pip.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #473 on: March 20, 2018, 09:45:58 pm »
An excellent solution to any problematic point. Glad the two sidings version is proving successful.
You know you're getting older when your mind makes commitments your body can't meet.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #474 on: March 21, 2018, 06:44:19 am »
Sorry to hear about your problems with the point, now happily solved.  One good thing about Peco points, for all their faults, is that trains (all mine, at least) are quite happy on facing points after a curve.
With kind regards
Laurence
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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #475 on: March 21, 2018, 07:27:48 am »
Excellent solution John. Pleased that it worked out, although a very intricate solution. I do find that reversing manoeuvres across points can cause problems, especially with empty wagons. I don’t run steam but wonder if it is the same issue with tenders. It seems that n gauge can have “weight problems”, unusually in the modern day, due to lack of it!

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #476 on: March 21, 2018, 07:36:50 am »
Your ramblings are very interesting. Rest assured, there are people following, me included here in Oz! :thumbsup:
« Last Edit: March 21, 2018, 07:38:07 am by Bealman »
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #477 on: March 21, 2018, 07:48:08 am »
Sorry to hear about your problems with the point, now happily solved.  One good thing about Peco points, for all their faults, is that trains (all mine, at least) are quite happy on facing points after a curve.

I like Peco points (I like most Peco things, though!).  They have a housing for the switch very neatly machined into the stock rail which prevents a lot of difficulties, I think.  Kato has decided to use plain stock rails which is why I had to resort to these modifications.

The troubles were most likely to occur with 0-6-0 and 0-8-0 locomotives and tender engines running in reverse.  And almost always on the diverging road.  Locomotives with a front bogie generally were fine running forward - the bogie doing what is meant to do.

There is an important point about Kato points, both #4 and #6.  They have never given me any problems whatsoever when used with Kato locomotives.  Kato products are, I believe, very much a system and a really fine system at that.  I suppose that Kato is, in some respects, similar to Marklin 'H0' (and 'Mini-Club too!) in this regard.

John

'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #478 on: March 21, 2018, 07:48:17 am »
Very good solution John.
And please do keep rambling away - keeps me entertained for one.
Martin
It's you railway so build it as you want and run whatever you like. The only rule is - ENJOY :
My Layouts -
Port Perran:- Trepol Bay:-

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Re: A Table-Top Railway in British 'N' Gauge
« Reply #479 on: March 21, 2018, 10:07:18 am »
Sorry to hear about your problems with the point, now happily solved.  One good thing about Peco points, for all their faults, is that trains (all mine, at least) are quite happy on facing points after a curve.

I must admit I have facing points all over my layout(s) and agree with Laurence about Peco points.
That looks to be quite a piece of meat taken off the railhead but, hey, if it works then fair play to you, John :thumbsup:

 

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