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Author Topic: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)  (Read 6223 times)

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Online 70000

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #90 on: July 31, 2018, 10:03:03 am »
Looks like I can get away with it being positioned as originally intended after all.........



The rear corner is about a scale 12' from the passing trams on the reserved track that loops round the back of the houses, but doesn't look too bad.

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #91 on: September 12, 2018, 08:23:56 am »
After a longish gap (too many other things to do...), attention has now turned to one of the buildings I need for the centre of town on the layout.

I had decided that another church would be in order, but nothing suitable seemed to sold commercially to fit in the space that I have available - so its back to scratchbuilding!

It needed to be a low relief structure and preferably something imposing due to its location, so I resorted to looking through my "holiday snaps" to see if I could come up with a suitable subject. Most of the ones I had photographed were likely to be difficult to reproduce, architecturally, or had seriously large towers/spires which, as it is by the edge of the layout, were likely to be caught by limbs/clothing whilst operating the trains!

However, this one seemed to be a suitable subject..............



as the front part of the building - the entrance portico and the clock tower section - lend themselves to a low relief construction very easily.
The building in question is the United 1st Parish Church in Quincy, Massachusetts, (just south of Boston) and was built in 1828. It's actually the resting place of US Pesidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams as well.

The church website came up with a rather useful photo giving a better illustration of the frontage than my one that I took in 2012, so I have been able to make a scaled drawing from that, though the measurements are a mixture of quesswork/estimation/scaling to fit the space available!



Just got to get on with building it now..................


Online 70000

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #92 on: September 16, 2018, 11:08:50 am »
A start has been made..........



At least the main part of the frontage is a basic box shape to which the tower and portico can be added.

Offline Bealman

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #93 on: September 16, 2018, 11:17:28 am »
Really cool!  :thumbsup: :beers:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #94 on: September 20, 2018, 05:13:25 pm »
Steady progress is being made, so it is at least starting to look like the church now...



I've made a few alterations to simplify the construction - the most obvious being that it is a different colour to the original!
I decided not to try and show the joint lines of the original stone blocks as it wasn't worth the effort, to be honest, and as I didn't have any paint to match the colour of the granite used, its actually ending up in satin RAF barley grey paint.
Construction of the base that the model will sit on is also under way now as well, with the railings and wall already in place.

Offline Chetcombe

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #95 on: September 21, 2018, 02:59:33 am »
Very nice, it's coming along splendidly. It looks like whatever comes on top of the tower could be a challenge to model... a cupola? a dome?

Keep the photos coming!

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #96 on: September 21, 2018, 04:39:16 am »
Yes, great work!  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #97 on: September 21, 2018, 07:13:33 am »
Very nice, it's coming along splendidly. It looks like whatever comes on top of the tower could be a challenge to model... a cupola? a dome?

Keep the photos coming!

I'm going to try and come up with something similar to that which is on the prototype if I can. Sourcing something to make the dome at the top of the structure was initially a problem, but have found a rather handy solution to that now. Watch out for the next photo I post for the answer.......!

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #98 on: September 22, 2018, 05:48:24 pm »
The main body of the church is now complete and mounted on its base.......



Suitable clock faces have been found (on the internet) and will be printed off and fixed in place in due course.
All that needs to be produced now is the domed structure and its support columns that form part of the church "tower". The source of the dome itself is shown next to the model - The screw on cap to a plastic bottle of aftershave that came from a hotel in Bulgaria that I stayed in a few years ago!  It is actually just the right size for what I was looking for.......
The 8 columns will be formed from plastic rod, but I'm still seeking items that might be used for the remainder of it.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2018, 05:53:04 pm by 70000 »

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #99 on: September 26, 2018, 08:58:34 am »
The finished item..............



I declined to scratchbuild the weathervane on the top of the dome!
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 09:19:26 am by 70000 »

Offline Webbo

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #100 on: September 27, 2018, 03:21:12 am »
Looks magnificent. Fifer hobby lists a fret by Ngineering under detail parts that includes several types of weather vanes in case you're interested.

Webbo

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #101 on: September 27, 2018, 04:46:57 am »
Top job!  :thumbsup:
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #102 on: September 27, 2018, 10:03:17 am »
Excellent work on the church!   :beers: :greatpicturessign:

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #103 on: October 12, 2018, 05:03:14 pm »
Space, the final frontier.............



This is the largest area of blank space remaining on the baseboards that I have constructed so far and is a fairly significant one as it consists of an entire block of the Downtown area, opposite the main station building and the interurban tram terminus in the street.
I've still got a few DPM buildings that haven't been used so far, so two of those will fill up part of the space, but the rest of the buildings to fill the space up look, at this stage, as though they will have to be scratchbuilt accordingly.

I've been studying this pair of buildings - The Golden Plough Tavern and the Horatio Gates House from York, Pennsylvania -  as likely candidates to fill part of it all........................



Studying my own photos, and some others on the internet, I've worked out a combined frontage of around 62' for the buildings, which will enable them to go in the foreground, next to Woolies, with space still remaining for another building to go there as well.

For a change, I think I'm going to have to use card and printed brick/stone paper, rather than embossed plastic sheets for this job, as the timber/brickwork on the pub it too intricate to try and reproduce by any other means. Will have to do some experimenting to see what sort of effects I can get......
« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 05:59:43 pm by 70000 »

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Re: Rowhouses (and other US buildings)
« Reply #104 on: Today at 02:41:37 pm »
Having given some thought to the best way to represent a timber framed building - particularly in N - and after some experimentation with paint, brickpaper and various pens/pencils, I set about producing the front wall of the pub, which currently looks like this......



Starting with a sheet of plasticard the correct size - 32mm x 74mm (16' x 37') I marked on positions for the windows and the lower horizontal timbers.  The timbers were cut out from thin, clear, glazing sheet, stuck to the plasticard, and the area was painted accordingly in grey and white.
The windows are of a sufficiently "odd" design, that I just went ahead and produced them on the computer and printed them off. I didn't bother with any glazing bars as they would be too small to print properly - the main windows are 8mm square including the "frames". These were then stuck onto card ready for fixing to the model.

The only N brickpaper I had "in stock" - given that I don't normally use it - was a rather ancient pack of what I think was Prototype Models produced sheeting, that could actually be about 40 years old. Some of this was stuck onto the plasticard above the timbers for the upstairs flooring and then I hand-painted the timbers on that part of the building, after tracing their approximate positions from my photos of the original building.
As the building dates from around 1741, it must be the first known appearance of the BR double arrow logo and its Sealink equivalent, if you study the picures of the prototype and the model!!

It at least bears some relation to what it is supposed to represent, so will continue with the rest of the building in the same manner.

 

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