!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: My new locomotive works...  (Read 35881 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Atso

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #540 on: October 26, 2018, 12:05:22 pm »
There are some nice photos of LNER photos in the November issue of"Steam World" :

C9 D20 D49 etc.

Thanks for the heads up Joe. I'll keep an eye out for the magazine!

Offline Atso

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #541 on: October 26, 2018, 12:21:43 pm »
On previous paint jobs, I'd had some trouble getting a durable coat of paint using Humbrol gloss black enamel paints. More recently, I've switched over to Precision gloss black which, while much better than Humbrol, still has an annoying habit of rubbing off all to easily while handling the model prior to final varnishing.

Having patch painted in the black areas that have shown signs of scuffing already, I decided to try a technique that Ian Rathbone uses for his final varnishing. Rather than use varnishes intended for model painting, Ian uses Ronseal gloss polyurethane varnish to seal his painting and lining work. According to Ian, Ronseal does 'exactly what it says on the tin' and provides a very durable protective coating.

Earlier this year I purchased a tin of Ronseal gloss varnish, paying careful attention to ensure I got the version intended for thinning with white spirit. I mixed up a small amount with white spirit and tested this by air brushing it onto one of the early concept models of the County (which had been roughly painted using Tamiya acrylics). Having found that the varnish was happy to be air brushed and shown no detrimental effects to the model, I airbrushed it over the C1. This is now drying and, while it has delayed any further painting or lining for another day, I'm happier knowing that it should provide an additional level of protection from all the handling it will receive while I line it out.

I think I'll give it another coat once I've finished all the painting, lining and lettering/numbering to seal everything in before applying either weathering or a matt coat.

Offline Atso

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #542 on: October 29, 2018, 10:33:31 am »
Things have been progressing on various bits and pieces recently...

The C1 has had various features picked out in brass, black and polished steel and will move to the lining stage once dry. Apologies for the quality of the pictures, the sun is not being helpful to my phone camera today!





The County has not be neglected though and has seen the double lining applied and the valances painted green.



The double lining was created using clear decal paper sprayed in the colour of the outer lines and, once dry, a black line was ruled in using my bow pen. Once this was dry, I lined up a ruler against the edge of the black and used a curved no. 10 scalpel blade to cut the decal out. The taper of the blade results in the thin outer line when cut and I use the curved blade to ensure that the tip isn't in contact with the decal as I've found this can lead to a fuzzy or tore edge (despite always using fresh blades for this kind of work).

The corners are brush painted in once the decals have been applied, painting in the out lines first and the inner black line a day or two later. As I don't think Orange 'scales' well, I used Ian Rathbone's technique of using Humbrol no. 9 gloss tan, mixed with a little red, to represent the orange lining. When placed on the dark green surface, it looks better to my eyes - and who I am to argue with Mr Rathbone!

I've still got the splasher lining to do and then the other side - I must remember to buy some copper paint for the chimney!

The BR V3 has also had its lining finished but the present lighting conditions have defeated any attempt to get a half decent photograph of this loco this morning. I'll be added crests and numbers in due course.

Offline Roy L S

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1731
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #543 on: October 29, 2018, 07:58:15 pm »
Some lovely work there Steve, both locos are coming on a treat.

Shame you aren't able to get a decent pic of the V3, would be great to see that too!


Roy

Offline Train Waiting

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1568
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • The Table-Top Railway.
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #544 on: October 29, 2018, 08:17:09 pm »
The 'Atlantic' looks particularly fine.  What a gorgeous colour for a locomotive!

Wonderful work.

John
'Why does the Disney Castle work so well?  Because it borrows from reality without ever slipping into it.'

(Acknowledgement: John Goodall Esq, Architectural Editor, 'Country Life'.)


The Table-Top Railway is a train set trying and failing to be a model railway.

I believe that train sets and model railways are fun.

Offline Atso

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #545 on: November 06, 2018, 12:29:48 pm »
Thank you guys.

I'd forgotten that trying to fully line out apple green isn't always the easiest of jobs but I'm getting there.



A few touch ups to do on this side before progressing onto the other. Annoyingly, one of the home made boiler bands seems to have split and lost its upper part. I'll have to make a replacement and add it on later. I've 'cheated' for much of the straight black and white lining and used decals. However, these have been home made using my, now normal, approach of spraying the white (actually a very light grey) onto some decal film and ruling on the black line once dry. A curved no. 10 scalpel blade is used to trim the excess, leaving a white line that is finer than I could find on any commercially produced decal sheet. All the corners and curves are brush painted while the red line (barely visible in this view) is bow pen and brush work.


Offline R Marshall

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 24052
  • Posts: 191
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #546 on: November 06, 2018, 01:09:06 pm »
Steve,

That's very, very nice!

Like to see a video clip of it running when it's finished.

Regards,

Roy

Offline Dorsetmike

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 2365
  • Posts: 3186
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Grumpy old fart
    • Skype
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #547 on: November 06, 2018, 02:37:41 pm »
In the days when my hands were steady enough to do lining I used drawing pens, various size lines from 0.1mm to 2.0mm available, spare nibs available too so cheaper to buy one or two complete pens and an assortment of spare nibs

https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/AS25638/aristo-mg1-technical-drawing-pen

https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/AS25621/aristo-mg1-replacement-nib

Used with opaque drawing inks, can be mixed to make other colours/shades.

https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/AS25597/aristo-drawing-ink-23ml

I originally used the Rotring Isograph pens but the Aristo have a wider range of nib sizes and are a bit cheaper. Being a nib rather than a brush I found the lines easier to draw.

You do need to thoroughly wash them clean after use as the very small diameter tips (smallest is 0.1mm) can clog easily.



Cheers MIKE
(Sorry, but you are not allowed to access the gallery)


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline Atso

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #548 on: November 06, 2018, 03:44:40 pm »
Thank you guys.

Roy, I will certainly post a video of this when (if) it gets finished!  :D

Thanks Mike, I've tried one of those in the past but unfortunately didn't get on with it. My personal preference is to use a bow pen with thick(ish) gloss enamel paints where possible. I find that the enamel can be removed and/or manipulated once applied using a fine brush moistened with white spirit (almost dry) to get as close to a perfect line as possible. As I suffered some nerve damage during my time as a competitive figure skater, I find that something to rest my wrists on essential to prevent the subsequent shakes from disturbing fine details. As long as you are lining onto a gloss surface, you really can get away with murder - as long as you use something that won't reactivate with white spirit. I've moved from Humbrol gloss varnish for this reason as, with repeated applications, it can be worn away. I've not had any such problems having air brushed the C1 with thinned Ronseal 'Hardglaze' polyurethane varnish.

Still related to the C1 but nothing to do with the lining, I received some 2mm brass rod and some M2 washers from Eileen's Emporium today. My plan was to solder the washers to the rod but, being silly, I didn't consider that the washer would be slightly oversize to clear the threads of screws. A quick search found some smaller brass washers (12BA, I think) so these were substituted. As the holes are smaller than the rod, I soldered the edge of the washer to a piece of scrap brass and used this as a handle to gently open out the hole to a snug fit using a tapered broach. Once I had the correct diameter hole, I soldered the washer onto the rod, filed the end flush, along with putting two flats onto the washer, and then carefully cut a slot down the center(ish) using a piercing saw. After this I filled the gap with Araldite and, once it had started to set, scrapped off the excess leaving me with these.



Once the Araldite has fully hardened, I'll cut these off from the remaining rod so that I have two half bonded by the Araldite.

I only need two of these for the C1 but thought it best to make a couple of spares. Would anyone like to venture a guess as to their purpose?

Offline Shiney Sheff

  • Trade Count: (+2)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23792
  • Posts: 315
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #549 on: November 06, 2018, 04:24:49 pm »
Not a clue  :no:

Offline Snowwolflair

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25174
  • 2mm Association Number: 4194
  • Posts: 2404
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #550 on: November 06, 2018, 04:33:26 pm »
Electrical tender coupling like the Farish type.

Offline Atso

  • Advertiser
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1664
  • Country: 00
    • Awards
Re: My new locomotive works...
« Reply #551 on: November 06, 2018, 04:42:23 pm »
Electrical tender coupling like the Farish type.

Spot on! That's the hope anyway. Unfortunately, now that the Araldite is in, I'm prevented from doing any more soldering on these. Therefore, I'll have to rely on some spring loaded contact wires to connect these to the loco and tender frames/pickups.

 

Please Support Us!
November Goal: £55.00
Due Date: Nov 30
Total Receipts: £55.00
Below Goal: £0.00
Site Currency: GBP
100% 
November Donations


Advertise Here
anything