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Author Topic: The Train Shed Project  (Read 40052 times)

mattycoops43, petecol and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Steamie+

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #345 on: January 11, 2017, 08:47:59 am »
I chose DCC, having had no prior experience of using DCC, simply so that I could control locomotives independently without having any track sections including the ability to double-head trains. (There was one combined passenger train with a Bulleid Light Pacific and an ex-WR pannier tank that was double-headed in 1962 which I wanted to run). The improved ability for slow-speed running, e.g. shunting, is also important for me.

i like the fact also about slow running is better with DCC and it looks more realistic, i am completely new to modelling trains just under 12 months now and it gets better and better the more i learn ( or try to ) about the hobby. I wish i had took it up years ago when i could afford it more, but that is for another thread.    :thumbsup:
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Offline Webbo

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #346 on: January 11, 2017, 08:52:40 am »
My track sections are defined by the setting of my points. My layout is very simple so DCC has zero advantage in this respect. I'm running triple headed trains at the moment with all the same locomotive type and this is dead simple with DC. These locos all have dual flywheels and together with the momentum of the train, the slow speed performance is just as good with DC as it is with DCC. Things are more complicated with DCC as the combination of locomotives has to be set up as a consist. The counterbalancing benefit of DCC is that the headlights are only lit on the leading locomotive and if I hit the horn or bell buttons, it is only the leading locomotive that makes a noise. 

Webbo

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #347 on: January 11, 2017, 09:18:07 am »
I guess that, in the end, it all comes down to personal preference and what you're happy with.  I wouldn't want to suggest to anyone that they convert to a system unless they are totally happy with it.  In my case, I have worked in the fields of digital electronics and computational physics, so I see DCC as the system for me.  In days before DCC, I designed and built a digital, inertia-based acceleration and deceleration system, complete with regulator, steam cutoff and brake controls.   But if it's not for you, stick to what you feel comfortable with.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #348 on: January 11, 2017, 07:04:19 pm »
I made less progress than I had hoped today but, because of other commitments, I was only able to spend less than two hours in the train shed today.  I did think I might finish installing the first point in the goods yard, but I found I needed to make some minor modifications to the track layout, so that curtailed my point installation.  The fist problem I encountered was that I had not got the curvature quite right for the short linking piece of track that connected the goods yard to the goods shed loop.  So I had quite a bit of fiddling to try and align it better.  The preparation of the point and the Seep mounting went quite smoothly for a change.  I think I have got the process well characterised now.  I pinned the point in position and drilled a 1mm hole through the operating slider.  I then used my template to drill the 1mm holes through the baseboard to mark the positions of the fixing screws for the Seep.  After that, I lifted the point and levered the frog wire of away from the plastic infrastructure, tinned it and attached the frog dropper.  I also marked the area of the cork underlay to be cut away and made the cut-out, followed by drilling a 2mm hole in the baseboard for the dropper.  I enlarged the point rod hole with a 4mm drill and used the 3mm router to turn the hole into a slot.  I replaced the point, complete with dropper, fitted the Seep to the underside of the baseboard, and checked the operation of the point together with the symmetrical movement of the Seep.  Everything went according to plan.

While I was considering the extension from the point into the goods yard, I noticed that the second goods yard point was fouled, not by a cross member, but by a longitudinal member under the board.  I had carefully checked the positions of the cross members when I laid out the original tracks, but when I made the late addition of the goods yard, I failed to check the longitudinals.  This meant that I had to move the second point further into the goods yard, so there could only be one further point instead of the original two.  So I had to peel of the self adhesive cork underlay and refit the underlay to suit the new arrangement.  The original idea was for there to be a siding for a livestock dock, another for the coal yard and one for crane operations.  Under the revised scheme, the crane operations can be transferred to the yard side of the bay platform.  There is no platform on the yard side, so the crane should be fine there.

Anyway, after all this unplanned activity, I was able to stick down the first yard point and check that the movement was not impeded by the Copydex.  I cut the extension rails for the goods yard, one for the bay platform and one to connect with the second yard point.  So I now have to solder the wiring loom to the Seep and connect the auxiliary switch.  Itís slow progress, but at least itís progress.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #349 on: January 12, 2017, 07:45:58 am »
I made less progress than I had hoped today but, because of other commitments, I was only able to spend less than two hours in the train shed today.  I did think I might finish installing the first point in the goods yard, but I found I needed to make some minor modifications to the track layout, so that curtailed my point installation.  The fist problem I encountered was that I had not got the curvature quite right for the short linking piece of track that connected the goods yard to the goods shed loop.  So I had quite a bit of fiddling to try and align it better.  The preparation of the point and the Seep mounting went quite smoothly for a change.  I think I have got the process well characterised now.  I pinned the point in position and drilled a 1mm hole through the operating slider.  I then used my template to drill the 1mm holes through the baseboard to mark the positions of the fixing screws for the Seep.  After that, I lifted the point and levered the frog wire of away from the plastic infrastructure, tinned it and attached the frog dropper.  I also marked the area of the cork underlay to be cut away and made the cut-out, followed by drilling a 2mm hole in the baseboard for the dropper.  I enlarged the point rod hole with a 4mm drill and used the 3mm router to turn the hole into a slot.  I replaced the point, complete with dropper, fitted the Seep to the underside of the baseboard, and checked the operation of the point together with the symmetrical movement of the Seep.  Everything went according to plan.

While I was considering the extension from the point into the goods yard, I noticed that the second goods yard point was fouled, not by a cross member, but by a longitudinal member under the board.  I had carefully checked the positions of the cross members when I laid out the original tracks, but when I made the late addition of the goods yard, I failed to check the longitudinals.  This meant that I had to move the second point further into the goods yard, so there could only be one further point instead of the original two.  So I had to peel of the self adhesive cork underlay and refit the underlay to suit the new arrangement.  The original idea was for there to be a siding for a livestock dock, another for the coal yard and one for crane operations.  Under the revised scheme, the crane operations can be transferred to the yard side of the bay platform.  There is no platform on the yard side, so the crane should be fine there.

Anyway, after all this unplanned activity, I was able to stick down the first yard point and check that the movement was not impeded by the Copydex.  I cut the extension rails for the goods yard, one for the bay platform and one to connect with the second yard point.  So I now have to solder the wiring loom to the Seep and connect the auxiliary switch.  Itís slow progress, but at least itís progress.

Thank you Laurence for your update, you have a good knowledge of electrics it seems and you are well on your way with your layout, can we have some more  :photospleasesign: we love to see them.   :thankyousign:  :thumbsup:
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Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #350 on: January 12, 2017, 08:45:16 am »
I also look forward to seeing more train pictures as soon as you've got enough trackwork completed to your satisfaction, Laurence.

This summer, it would be nice to see some special trains to Cornwall (and back) for the locals to enjoy a holiday by the sea. Probably BR Lined Maroon Standard (later Mark 1) and Collett design coaches?

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #351 on: January 12, 2017, 10:14:59 am »
I also look forward to seeing more train pictures as soon as you've got enough trackwork completed to your satisfaction, Laurence.

This summer, it would be nice to see some special trains to Cornwall (and back) for the locals to enjoy a holiday by the sea. Probably BR Lined Maroon Standard (later Mark 1) and Collett design coaches?
The period I'm modelling pretty well predates maroon livery.  By 1959, some of the Stanier pacifics were maroon and the Caledonian was 8 maroon coaches pulled by a maroon Princess Coronation.  It made a fine site and completed the 401 mile journey between Euston and Glasgow Central in 6 hours and 40 minutes in each direction.  That's an AVERAGE speed of over 60 mph. 

However, some holiday specials would be good. I may acquire a Castle or/and a rebuilt Scott for the purpose.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #352 on: January 12, 2017, 11:10:39 am »
Nice choice, a Castle!

Better get a pre-order in sharpish Laurence as I suspect those that have been waiting 3+ years (inc. me!) for it to arrive will be making quite long queues for a second one!

Dave G


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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #353 on: January 12, 2017, 08:50:31 pm »
I managed to get down to the train shed today for about an hour, although I didnít make much progress.  There was a big, but not unexpected, disappointment.  Now that I have two Digikeijs operational, I thought I would try including four points in a route, two on each Digikeijs.  Unfortunately, the route switching was not reliable.  Occasionally all four point would switch, but usually one and sometimes two would fail to switch.  Itís unlikely to be a lack of power because the power supply can deliver 8A.  So there are only two possibilities.  I noticed that when I programmed the routes, the controller sent a signal to each accessory as it was added to the route.  So there may be something intrinsic in the Prodigy Advance DCC system that prevents several points from operating at the same time.  Or it may be the combination of the Prodigy Advance and the Digikeijs.  If that is the case, then my contingency plan of switching each point individually before a set of trains run will have to be used, instead of setting the routes.  This should be no problem and it will actually be more like real life, where the levers in the lever frames would all have to be operated one by one.  Remember that the period modelled is before the use of electric points, at least in rural areas.

The other possibility is that the problem could be related to my point template.  I noticed that I had to adjust every Seep to the limit of movement allowed by the stand-off mounting block in order to get it to operate correctly.  When I investigated as I installed the sixth point, I found that the centre hole was 1mm out of alignment.  This may be responsible for the problem, although it is unlikely.  If the route test had gone well today, I had intended to install the additional Digikeijs and rearrange the point connections to give the required distribution of points within routes.  But I have now resolved to carry on with the original configuration.  If I later find that the revised template provides a working basis for reintroducing routes, then I can reconfigure the points as required.  Otherwise I will continue without using routes.

Well, with the disappointing news out of the way, I can say what I did achieve this morning.  I managed to wire up the point harness for the first goods yard turnout into the bay platform and fitted all the spare sleepers.  Once again, like the head and tail shunts, I am not using droppers and insulated joiners in the yard, but metal joiners with no droppers.  So each siding will only be active when the points are set correctly.  I hope to be able to make time tomorrow to connect the remaining point in the yard and connect all the droppers, so I can fully test the board and get it screwed down, ready to move on to the right hand station board.

There is one final bit of bad news/good news.  The other day, I had a great deal of difficulty snipping off a point rod with my cutters.  I foolishly tried to use my Xuron to finish the job, but I have since noticed a couple or small damage marks in the blades.  I have filed off the burrs and they are still OK for track cutting, but I sometimes have to adjust the position of the blades for trimming plastic.  So, it is a mistake to think that a Xuron is suitable for the point rods.  The good news bit is that I ordered a set of 22mm cutting/grinding discs for gemstones and these cut the rods effectively, although it takes a little time.  They are also excellent for removing any rough ends on rails, rather than filing.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #354 on: January 12, 2017, 09:48:58 pm »
Oh dear :(
It's a shame you have found out the hard way not to use Xurons for anything else but cutting track - not even cutting fine wire :no:

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #355 on: January 12, 2017, 10:53:06 pm »
I also found out the hard way, but now I have a Xuron that can be used for cutting rail as well as stripping very fine wire. I still use mine for cutting brass, but cutting anything made of steel is a definite no-no no matter how thin it may be.

Webbo

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #356 on: January 13, 2017, 06:05:53 am »
Thanks for the update. A bit of a disappointment having to change your routing plans.

Shame about the Xuron cutters. I was warned when I first bought my pair to not use them for anything other than cutting track.

Dare I suggest that you get yourself new set exclusively for trackwork to avoid any bad joins?

Dave G

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #357 on: January 13, 2017, 06:41:18 am »
Thanks for the update. A bit of a disappointment having to change your routing plans.

Shame about the Xuron cutters. I was warned when I first bought my pair to not use them for anything other than cutting track.

Dare I suggest that you get yourself new set exclusively for trackwork to avoid any bad joins?

Dave G
Fortunately, the damage is very slight and they still work fine for cutting track.  It's the fiddly plastic bits that sometimes don't cut properly, but it's no problem.  I guess I'll get a new pair eventually.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #358 on: January 13, 2017, 07:42:12 am »
Thanks for the update. A bit of a disappointment having to change your routing plans.

Shame about the Xuron cutters. I was warned when I first bought my pair to not use them for anything other than cutting track.

Dare I suggest that you get yourself new set exclusively for trackwork to avoid any bad joins?

Dave G
Fortunately, the damage is very slight and they still work fine for cutting track.  It's the fiddly plastic bits that sometimes don't cut properly, but it's no problem.  I guess I'll get a new pair eventually.

Sometimes we make mistakes Laurence itís part of our natural being, but hopefully we learn from them and carry on. I know of a few people who have given up on things because they made mistakes. But i think we railway modellers are made of sterner stuff.   :thumbsup:
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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #359 on: January 13, 2017, 09:59:35 am »
If it's any consolation at least you've prompted me to amend my 'Beginners Guide' in the Knowledge Bank, Laurence.
 :thankyousign:

 

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