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Author Topic: The Train Shed Project - Marton Hinmarche  (Read 112245 times)

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Offline lil chris

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #330 on: January 08, 2017, 09:44:35 pm »
Looking good Laurence, you have achieved more than me this year already. I need to do more on my layout. All the best for this new year.
Lil Chris
My layout here East Lancashire Lines
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=29492.0

Steamie+

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #331 on: January 09, 2017, 06:42:48 am »
Love the way you work things out Laurence. Your layout is looking brilliant, i love the long runs.     :thumbsup:

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #332 on: January 09, 2017, 06:40:04 pm »
I installed the first turnout into the goods depot today.  It is Accessory 33, but if the strategy of using an extra Digikeijs works, it will become Accessory 51.  However, I donít see any point (ugh!) in changing the wiring design until I have proved that the revised strategy will work.  I didnít get very far today and I had a slight disaster, partly by design.  I decided that I needed to revise my method of connecting the frog droppers and so experimented with the points designated as Accessory 33.  This involved cutting a section out of the self-adhesive cork underlay and connecting the dropper to the wire within the points that connects the two halves of the frog.  I have used this connection method before without removing the section of underlay, but it is difficult to get the points to sit down correctly on the underlay unless you can align the dropper connection point exactly with the hole in the baseboard.  The idea of removing the section of underlay was to allow sufficient space beneath the points for the insulated wire, so that it would not matter if the hole was not exactly in the right place.  You can see what I did to make more space in the picture.


I left a spare length of dropper wire protruding from the hole so that it is clearly visible. 
It would have worked well but for the fact that, on this occasion, the dropper would not connect satisfactorily with the wire on the points.  The plastic infrastructure of the points kept melting and preventing a good connection.  On the four previous points, this never happened.  So I decided to connect directly to the frog.  I had tried this before, but the solder always fouled the joiners and had to be removed carefully.  It occurred to me that I could try removing the next set of sleepers.  The only problem with this is that there is then insufficient support for the frog and, when the frog was heated, it moved and proved impossible to relocate into correct alignment.  I do have a plan for resurrecting that set of points but, for the moment, they have been consigned to the bin reserved for damaged items.  However, I was able to use the original technique successfully on a second set of points.  It has now occurred to me that it might be better to connect with bare TCW and connect it to an insulated length of wire once through the baseboard.

However, the points are now installed and I have been carrying out the preparatory work in readiness for adding the second set of points.  Hopefully I will be able to finish installing them tomorrow and move on to the goods yard.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline lil chris

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #333 on: January 09, 2017, 10:41:18 pm »
Hi Laurence, I found scratching the frog wire with a craft knife and then using some liquid flux made it easier to solder the drop wire. Also try to get the hole in the correct place but I usually make the top of the hole large, like countersunk so it gives you a bit of room for manoeuvring the point. Nice to see you are making progress.
Lil Chris
My layout here East Lancashire Lines
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=29492.0

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #334 on: January 10, 2017, 06:54:43 pm »
Hi Laurence, I found scratching the frog wire with a craft knife and then using some liquid flux made it easier to solder the drop wire. Also try to get the hole in the correct place but I usually make the top of the hole large, like countersunk so it gives you a bit of room for manoeuvring the point. Nice to see you are making progress.
Thanks for the tips and hints, Chris.  Most useful.
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #335 on: January 10, 2017, 07:26:22 pm »
I only managed to install a single point today.  There havenít been any major issues, but a few hiccups.  I put the point in position and used my template to create the drilling positions for the Seep.  I raised the frog wire slightly above the point infrastructure so I could solder the dropper to it without melting the plastic.  So far, so good.  I cut away a section of the points underlay to allow the dropper to sit under the points without raising the level of the points above the baseboard.  I then used the 3mm router to enlarge the point rod hole to allow plenty of room for normal operation.  I fitted the spare sleepers and affixed the points with Copydex.  Then I installed the Seep.  To my chagrin, the Seep would not switch the point blades satisfactorily.  This led to some investigatory work.

My first thought was that the positions of the holes from the template were inaccurate.  I readjusted the Seep by fiddling, but to no effect.  I tried routing the point lever hole from the underside, in case there was some obstruction, all to no avail.  In the end, I decided that I would have to lift the points and use the router from the top side of the board.  When I lifted the points, I noticed a significant amount of Copydex in the vicinity of the point operating slider, so I removed it.  I carried on with the router, but I think the Copydex was the culprit.  The slider moved OK before I removed the Copydex, but I suspect the extra resistance was enough to prevent the Seep from operating the points successfully.  Unfortunately, while all this was going on, the baseboard fell from its propped position.  I the discovered that it had significantly bent the Seep operating rod, so the points would still not operate.  After several attempts, using two pairs of pliers, I was able to straighten the operating rod and the points then operated correctly.  Phew!

With all this going on, I forgot to install power droppers to the toe end of the points.  However, I have now installed a short section of track attached to the toe end and I will be able to install the droppers at the far end of this section.  I have connected all the droppers to the DCC bus and tested all the sections of track with the 2-6-4T.  So, although the progress was slow, at least everything worked in the end
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline weave

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #336 on: January 10, 2017, 08:00:23 pm »
Hi Laurence,

Glad all worked out in the end (sort of).

I might have said before but although I know nothing about DCC and don't know what you're talking about half the time (not you, the DCC  :)) you seem to fill me with inspiration if things go wrong.

You're not the only one for inspiration but that's what's great about the forum, to keep going and sort problems rather than giving up.

If my board had fallen over at that point it would probably be in the garden!

Keep up the good work and look forward to more trains and scenery (that I can understand)

Cheers weave  :beers:

Offline port perran

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #337 on: January 10, 2017, 08:24:23 pm »
I can only echo what Weave has said.
DCC is a complete bewilderment to me but I admire your persistence.
Im also very much looking forward to seeing the scenery develop and trains running throug it.
Martin
It's you railway so build it as you want and run whatever you like. The only rule is - ENJOY :
My Layouts -
Port Perran:- Trepol Bay:-

Offline Snowwolflair

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #338 on: January 10, 2017, 08:28:23 pm »
If women were as interesting as model railways , DCC would be the very high maintenance blond in the corner. 8)

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #339 on: January 10, 2017, 09:42:31 pm »
If women were as interesting as model railways, DCC would be the very high-maintenance blonde in the corner. 8)

But the performance would be great! 8-)

Offline Snowwolflair

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #340 on: January 10, 2017, 09:43:47 pm »
If women were as interesting as model railways, DCC would be the very high-maintenance blonde in the corner. 8)

But the performance would be great! 8-)

Only if you know what you are doing  :goggleeyes:

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #341 on: January 11, 2017, 06:38:08 am »
If women were as interesting as model railways, DCC would be the very high-maintenance blonde in the corner. 8)

But the performance would be great! 8-)

Only if you know what you are doing  :goggleeyes:
It's actually much simpler than DC.  You don't need any sections and you can still operate the points by any means that takes your fancy, or even manually, if required.  The great beauty, though, is that you can control everything from one controller of ir there are three of you, you could have three controllers, one each, and everyone could still drive anything (although you would have to agree who controls what, otherwise there could be mayhem).
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline Webbo

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #342 on: January 11, 2017, 07:25:12 am »
Perhaps true Laurence. Like modern cars loaded with computer control coming out your ears, provided everything is working OK things are jake. Heaven help you if things go wrong. I recently had a DCC sound equipped loco emit a cloud of smoke when a chip failed suddenly for no good reason. The loco is now DC. It seems to me that with 15 V AC being continuously applied to the loco with DCC, the potential of bad things happening is much greater than the occasional ramping up to 12 V that occurs in a DC powered locomotive. Continuing with Snowwolflair's analogy, the blond in the corner is more likely to have a boyfriend in the underworld. DCC is living a fair bit more dangerously than living with DC.

I have a DCC capability on my layout, but it is primarily to support my few sound equipped locos. I like it, but I don't trust it.

Webbo
 

Steamie+

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #343 on: January 11, 2017, 07:39:13 am »
Perhaps true Laurence. Like modern cars loaded with computer control coming out your ears, provided everything is working OK things are jake. Heaven help you if things go wrong. I recently had a DCC sound equipped loco emit a cloud of smoke when a chip failed suddenly for no good reason. The loco is now DC. It seems to me that with 15 V AC being continuously applied to the loco with DCC, the potential of bad things happening is much greater than the occasional ramping up to 12 V that occurs in a DC powered locomotive. Continuing with Snowwolflair's analogy, the blond in the corner is more likely to have a boyfriend in the underworld. DCC is living a fair bit more dangerously than living with DC.

I have a DCC capability on my layout, but it is primarily to support my few sound equipped locos. I like it, but I don't trust it.

Webbo
 

I am a bit like you Webbo, just doing DCC on the new layout and it is great but, it can be temperamental, i had power to all the track then i switched a point for a train to go to the station and it got to the point and stopped, it worked before but now havenít got a clue what has happened and i wonít get it sorted until i can get to the shed at some point and sort it. But other then that i really like the fact you can have more people or even oneself operating lots of locos.    :thumbsup:
« Last Edit: January 11, 2017, 08:44:33 am by Steamie+ »

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #344 on: January 11, 2017, 08:21:24 am »
I chose DCC, having had no prior experience of using DCC, simply so that I could control locomotives independently without having any track sections including the ability to double-head trains. (There was one combined passenger train with a Bulleid Light Pacific and an ex-WR pannier tank that was double-headed in 1962 which I wanted to run). The improved ability for slow-speed running, e.g. shunting, is also important for me.

 

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