!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: A Model Railway in a Toolbox  (Read 5140 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 125
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #30 on: January 21, 2018, 04:07:08 pm »
Work has continued with cutting mount board for the ground surfaces.

All three buildings now have parts for a sub-base and I have also cut the card to fill out the rest of the areas that will be permanently fixed to the board.

The first photo shows the buildings with their sub-bases. The buildings on either side of the layout have some additional space in front of them for additional details to be fixed. I plan to have a vehicle being loaded with goods from the warehouse on the right hand side, but not decided about the one on the left yet.



The rest of the areas that need raising up to match rail height were cut out next and the next photo shows all the pieces of card laid in place before gluing commences. The pieces of card between the tracks are only a sinlge thickness of card, but I may need to use some thinner sheet to ensure the road surface isn't high enough for the wagon couplings to snag on it, so they will be the last to be fixed in place after more testing with the road surface layer on top.

The remaining areas where the cork is still visible will be covered with a layer of ballast once I'm entirely happy with the other ground surface cover. Need to get the permanent sections of card glued down before I think about ballasting though.

« Last Edit: January 21, 2018, 04:09:18 pm by AC »
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline G_N_E_R

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 275
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • I enjoy cigars, scotch, polo and N gauge
    • Facebook
    • Instagram
    • Twitter
    • YouTube
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #31 on: January 21, 2018, 07:30:15 pm »
Looking excellent!
Regards Philip

Offline port perran

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 8869
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #32 on: January 21, 2018, 07:32:22 pm »
Coming along nicely.
It's you railway so build it as you want and run whatever you like. The only rule is - ENJOY :
My Layouts -
Port Perran:- Trepol Bay:-

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 125
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #33 on: February 02, 2018, 01:32:56 pm »
A small update on this; I have started cutting out the ground surface from Metcalfe paving and cobblestone sheets, PN111.

I've partially glued the buffer stop in place on the siding at the top of the photo, partly to help with cutting the granite setts to fit around it and also because it doesn't fit on code 55 track so well as code 80 track, so it needed a little trimming below rail head height.

None of the setts have been glued in place yet which is why the space for wheel flanges doesn't look even between the rails of the siding. The card I had previously cut for between the rails did turn out to be too thick once the setts were laid on top as I had thought it may be. A replacement strip of card was cut from the edge of the metcalfe sheets being used for the top surface instead, which is about half the thickness, and that seems to be better.

I decided to have the setts in this section at 90 degrees to the rails with a couple of rows of setts parallel to the rails to mark the swept path of any wagons moving along the siding for vehicles to keep clear of.

I've also modified the removable sub base that the central building will be glued to slightly, but you can't really see much of that in this photo.

My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline Moores-ee

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 31
  • Country: england
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #34 on: February 19, 2018, 11:33:45 pm »
The embedded track with the cobbles looks fantastic, great looking layout.

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 125
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #35 on: April 29, 2018, 04:36:59 pm »
Time for another small update on Stanley Yard, my layout built in the top of a tool box. It doesn't seem like much, but it's getting there slowly.

The buffer stops for the three sidings have all been glued in place. They required a bit of adjustment to get to fit properly as hopefully the photo below shows.



These are the Peco N gauge rail built buffer stops, product code SL-340. On the left is a buffer stop in position on a section of Peco code 55 track on my layout built in a toolbox. The horizontal sections of rail on the buffer stop is almost high enough to be sat on top of the rail it should be bolted to the side of.

The buffer stop on the right is fitted to a spare section of Peco code 80 track that I had, which is coarser than the code 55. The extra depth in the code 80 track brings the buffer stop down a bit lower to the rail sides, but the horizontal sections of the buffer stop are still too high to look correct.

The photo below shows the adjusted buffer stop in place where I have trimmed down the legs that clip between the sleepers to bring the height down. If anyone's interested, there's a bit more info about this on my modelling blog found by clicking here.



Before starting to glue down the sheets of granite setts for the ground surface, I thought I should probably paint the sides of the rails and the buffer stops first. So having bought some Rust colour paint from Humbrol's acrylic Rail Paints range (Code RC402), I painted a coat on and have this as the result;



The setts are just positioned loosely in place for the photo. The rust colour has a bit of a pinkish tinge to it which doesn't look too bad on the sides of the rails, but looks a bit odd on the buffer stops, so they will need some more work doing to them. The cross bar part of the buffer stops could also do with painting more realistic colours to resemble a timber beam.
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+63)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 29399
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #36 on: April 29, 2018, 05:13:10 pm »
As I have a load of the SL-340s in a box to use that's an interesting mod to them. Does that put them at the right height for carriage/wagon/etc buffers please?

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 125
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #37 on: April 29, 2018, 08:26:51 pm »
As I have a load of the SL-340s in a box to use that's an interesting mod to them. Does that put them at the right height for carriage/wagon/etc buffers please?

I've just had a quick check (never actually looked at that before in detail as the buffer stops seemed to work what ever height they were). A couple of wagons were spot on for height against the buffer stops, while a couple of other wagons were a fraction lower, but not by much so the buffers still made contact at a decent height. Maybe I'll try a couple of photos tomorrow to compare with.
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline port perran

  • Larger Gallery
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 8869
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #38 on: April 29, 2018, 08:30:46 pm »
Those buffer stops look really good and stand up well to close inspection.
Great stuff.
It's you railway so build it as you want and run whatever you like. The only rule is - ENJOY :
My Layouts -
Port Perran:- Trepol Bay:-

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 125
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #39 on: April 30, 2018, 03:33:13 pm »
I've taken a few photos of different wagons and engines against the buffer stops to show how the heights compare after the adjustments I made to the buffer stop to get them to sit at the correct height.

The image lists the items of rolling stock used in each photo that I used. For reference, the two Mill Lane Siding kits shown have both had the Peco wheels replaced with metal Graham Farish ones.


My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+63)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 29399
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #40 on: April 30, 2018, 08:07:51 pm »
Great. Thanks very much for taking the trouble. Now for the crucial question. Can you recall how much you removed from the buffer stops please?

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 125
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #41 on: April 30, 2018, 08:49:23 pm »
There's a couple of steps in the part of the buffer stop that slots between the sleepers that you can see right at the bottom in this photo. I cut as near to the step as I could about 1mm up from the very bottom of the moulding (so the side of the knife blade was against the stepped out bit if that makes sense)



I've marked a red line on the photo below to show roughly where I cut it to try and explain it clearer


My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+63)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 29399
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #42 on: May 01, 2018, 11:38:41 am »
Perfick. Thank you!

Offline AC

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14125
  • Posts: 125
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #43 on: July 29, 2018, 06:10:21 pm »
Time for another update. Since last time, I have attempted to improve the painting on the buffer stops and have laid the ballast.
 
The first photo shows how the buffer stops look before I started the ballasting
 

 
The setts in the background still haven't been glued down yet, so they don't appear in the next two photos, but now that the ballasting is mostly finished, that'll be the next thing I do.
 

 

 
I used a mixture of Fine Buff and Fine Brown ballast from Woodland Scenics so that it wasn't all one uniform colour. There's a few areas of ballast that will need building up slightly once the setts have been fixed in place to reduce the step down from the top surface.
My NGF Layout Thread: Stanley Yard; a Model Railway in a Toolbox

My Modelling Blog (Multiple Scales): AC's Miscellaneous Model Mixture Blog
My Old Website: AC's Stuff

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+63)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 29399
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: A Model Railway in a Toolbox
« Reply #44 on: July 29, 2018, 09:26:56 pm »
That looks very good

 

Please Support Us!
September Goal: £55.00
Due Date: Sep 30
Total Receipts: £55.00
Below Goal: £0.00
Site Currency: GBP
100% 
September Donations


Advertise Here
anything