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Author Topic: LSWR Adams 395  (Read 5177 times)

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Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2016, 07:12:18 pm »

I've been experimenting with a new chassis for the above and thought I would try to make use of finescale wheels.

The frame sides are made of 0.3mm thick phosphor bronze strip (ideally I would have used 0.5mm but I didn't have any). The axle hole centres were located by glueing the coupling rod ( I used a 2mm Assocation "Farish replacement" etch for the rods, the 4F rods on this by luck being at the right spacing for the Adams 395 as well) to two strips tack soldered together and drilling 0.5mm pilot holes. I then progressively used larger drills until I had a diameter of 1.5mm, and then cut out the slots. Unfortunately I forgot to check the rod was straight before drilling the holes so the centre hole was 0.1mm higher than the outer two.

I then tack soldered the frame sides to a spacer formed by 1.5mm double sided PCB, this being scored with a scrawker down the middle to electrically isolate the 2 frame sides to give a split chassis arrangement in which all wheels pick up current

The wheels are 2mm Association 10.5mm ones which come with a stub axles. These were joined by temporary muffs made from cotton bud sticks with some glue in to give a push fit for the axles, note that the proper acetyl muffs for use with the axles apparently aren't that suitable for playing around with.

After a lot of effort I ended up with a wheel back to back of 8.0mm, with the temporary muffs cut to allow about 1mm of lateral play within the frames, and a gap between the outside of the wheels and the temporary crankpin washers (made from wire cable outer) about 1mm as well. I used a spring instead of the normal Union Mills drawbar as I found the latter would give the frame too much of a jolt, this also means that all the wheels on the loco chassis can provide current to the motor

I was pleasantly surprised at how it all worked out. It will just about go around 9in Peco Setrack curves, will go through Peco Code 55 medium & large radius points & the 3 way point, and will also go along straight 9.42m gauge track. However the wheels fall off the rail if I try it on a 9.42mm gauge 12 in  radius curve. The loco runs with a slight wobble. I was managing to get scale speeds down to about 7 mph through the pointwork which is pretty similar to what I get with the normal UM loco chassis, hopefully a bit of further tweaking and use of the actual (heavier) loco body will improve performance.

One thing I did with some of the points including the 3 way was to follow a tip given by Noel Leaver elsewhere and to use a length of Code 40 rail against the wingrail to reduce the flangeway gap to about 0.7mm. This avoids the bump you get on unmodified Peco points, though the chassis wil still run through without this modification







Richard

Offline Dorsetmike

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #31 on: June 05, 2016, 09:06:59 pm »
Soon won't be anything left of the original UM loco, I can see a tender rebuild following. :whistle: 
Cheers MIKE


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #32 on: June 06, 2016, 11:23:09 am »
Yes it seems to be the way things are going what with not even the poor old drawbar surviving. I think the next step may be trying out Farish tender wheels with pickups.  Alternatively I could maybe saw the tender drive in half lengthways, insert a cigarette paper, and glue the 2 sides back together to give me a split chassis, but it doesn't seem a very prudent course of action

Richard

Offline paulprice

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #33 on: June 06, 2016, 11:35:12 am »
Wow and I though I was a bit extreme with some of my rebuilds


Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #34 on: June 07, 2016, 10:03:09 pm »
Wow and I though I was a bit extreme with some of my rebuilds

I didn't plan anything of this scale at the start, but one thing kind of leads to another  as I guess you well know from your Farish adventures. I don't really know what I'm doing, but seem to have avoided disaster so far. I'm sure it will happen sooner or later.  Mind you one reason I'm doing a new chassis is that I noticed the keeper plate of the original one was a bit bent so I put it in the vice to straighten it with scant regard for the yield stress of white metal and  it ended up significantly unstraight. I think it must be a lot slower doing it this way than starting completely from scratch, but it's a bit less daunting and you can always stop whenever you like and still have a working loco

Richard

Offline SOUTHFAN

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #35 on: June 21, 2016, 01:12:38 pm »
That looks really good.  A union mills still in production?  I was after one of the old 700  class
all the best
Intersted in Merchant Navy, Battle OB etc Farish locos &kits for SR locos and EMUS

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #36 on: June 21, 2016, 02:01:51 pm »
Thanks & welcome to the forum.

It acquired a coat of "Holly Green" this morning, will post some pictures when I've put all the bits back on

Union Mills are still going strong, there is no website, but you can give Colin a call on 01624 852896 to find out what's in stock

Richard

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #37 on: June 21, 2016, 08:13:37 pm »
That looks really good.  A union mills still in production?  I was after one of the old 700  class
all the best

I believe the 700 is/was scheduled for a rerun by Colin for this month; so call him!
Check out Avondale - My heritage railway themed layout :)

http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=29371.0

Offline SOUTHFAN

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2016, 04:50:18 pm »
I didn't think I would get a result that quickly - thanks for that I will ring him.
Intersted in Merchant Navy, Battle OB etc Farish locos &kits for SR locos and EMUS

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #39 on: December 29, 2016, 09:59:13 pm »

Have put the body together with a new chassis and given it some paint.

This chassis makes use of the Union Mills wheels and coupling rods. The wheels have been modified by gently clamping  the original UM axle into the chuck of a mini drill with the wheel attached. I reduced the flange depth from 0.7 to 0.5mm, took some material off the back of the wheel & took some off the front of the wheel to reduce the overall width from 2.3mm to 2.0mm. I guess I could have thinned them down a bit more, but wasn't feeling that brave.

I'm pleased with the result, with the wheels running OK, looking a lot better & not standing out so much, however the real plus is the amount of extra clearance created in the splashers.

I also made a new keeper plate from nickel silver sheet. This involved drilling holes which I then formed into vertical slots for the wheels by filing.

I sprayed it using a can of black Pro XL 1K Primer Surfacer which is an acid etch primer with a satin finish. I then used Maskol to mask off the areas I wanted to remain black and sprayed with Citadel Caliban Green paint using a Badger 250 Spray Gun. I've yet to apply any varnish or transfers

Richard






Offline Southernboy

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #40 on: December 29, 2016, 10:24:14 pm »
What an exquisite model - a delightful locomotive - and a project you should be justifiably proud of :)

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #41 on: January 16, 2017, 01:12:47 pm »
Have made a start on the tender. I replaced the original wheels with Grafar China production wheels. These are larger (8mm v 6mm) than the original and are insulated from the axle. Unfortunately the ones I got mount on to a 1.6mm diameter axle, whereas the UM axle is 1.5mm, however a combination of thread lock and then ZapagAP where needed seems to give a good push fit. 0.3mm Phosphor Bronze pickups were fitted to both sides, the ones on one side being soldered to the chassis with low melt solder and the ones on the other being soldered to 0.25mm PCB which was then glued on, with cigarette paper being glued to the chassis to insulate it.

I ran it with a test weight of a pound coin on top. I took some material off the flanges of the middle wheels to stop them fouling the motor, plus also had to pare away a bit of the chassis in places. Doesn't run too badly, obviously not as good as the original UM tender with its heavy tender & traction tyres. It can handle hauling the loco and 6 wagons which is enough for me. It can start to lose traction on 9in radius curves and on bad spots on the track, e.g. where I have a Code 40 to Code 55 to Code 80 transition. Also it can't crawl over points because once a loco wheel drops into the gap it starts to slip as it tries to dig it out

Would be grateful for any suggestions on how to improve its running



Then made a template out of card & plastic to represent the tender as shown below. Vertically I think I'll be OK with the coal piled up. The new tender is about 5mm shorter than the UM one which means I'll be left with a bit of a protrusion at the front where the mounting screw goes. I reckon the tender body will weigh around 12g which will be slightly more than the weight of the pound coin used for testing(9g)


Richard

Offline N-Gauge-US

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #42 on: January 16, 2017, 08:08:15 pm »
Wow Richard! I hadn't checked in on this thread in a while and so much has happened! Amazing work! Looking very forward to seeing how the tender turns out!

Philip
Check out Avondale - My heritage railway themed layout :)

http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=29371.0

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2017, 08:25:26 pm »
Have made a start on the tender body and now have a better idea how things will fit. As can be seen from the pics below I won't need too much coal to cover the motor. As the rear of the body is only c 1mm from the rear of the rear wheel  I've had to take about 3mm off the rear of the chassis. Fortunately I plan to use a DG coupling so should be able to make a bracket to hold a truncated coupling and then glue that to the chassis.

There is also quite a bit of space around the motor to allow me  to put a fair amount of lead in the corners

Richard




Online Atso

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Re: LSWR Adams 395
« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2017, 09:19:01 pm »
Wow, now this is a detailing project an a half and that 395 doesn't half look good!

I notice that you've fitted a Mashima motor (now rarer than Hen's teeth!), I've got one tender so converted (currently with another member) and I love the way it will sleeper crawl! Regarding your tender, adding weight will help but I suspect it will be difficult to get it anywhere near the original weight of the tender. I'm having to have a complete rethink regarding my 3D printed tender for my J6. I retained the original UM wheels and traction tired and stuffed the body with as much lead as I could fit. Performance was disappointing and I'll have to make a replacement tender which will be cast in white metal. All that being said, if you're only looking to move half a dozen wagons, you'll probably be ok.

Tongue firmly in check here: Having done all that exceptional work to this locomotive, it seems a shame not to fit it with see-through spoked wheels...  ;)

I'll get my coat!

P.S. Did I mention just how good the 395 is looking!  8)

 

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