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Author Topic: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout  (Read 10697 times)

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Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #60 on: November 04, 2018, 05:16:36 pm »
Here's the layout in itís new home:


Poor thing looks a little lost in there. Perhaps you could have doubled the size :D ;)

Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #61 on: November 06, 2018, 04:12:21 pm »
So, @Chris in Prague your wish is my command, well, ish. You asked for pictures and I'm giving you a poor quality video instead. However, at least it shows the FiNetrax goods yard in action. I've laid quite a bit of it now and wouldn't go back to Peco but this is just personal preference. The set of points in use is one of Wayne's 'standard crossovers'.

Of note, at the end, is a rake of Revolution's Class B Tankers  :D. I enjoyed having a BR Blue running session and I'm very much getting used to the Dapol magnetic couplers now. Shunting is fun  8)

Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline Dalek

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #62 on: November 08, 2018, 08:07:32 am »
What a great layout and post, lot of useful information. :)

Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #63 on: November 09, 2018, 06:55:38 am »
What a great layout and post, lot of useful information. :)

Thanks very much! Hope to have more soon.
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2018, 08:05:12 am »
What a great layout and post, lot of useful information. :)

Thanks very much! Hope to have more soon.

Many thanks, Richard. Looking forward to the next update of your excellent layout.

Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #65 on: November 10, 2018, 06:32:59 pm »
One afternoon this week, I sat down to build a kit, something I hadnít done in ages.

I chose the ĎWeighbridge Setí from Severn Models which I intend to model at the exit of the coal drops where the road heads into the goods yard. I bought this along with a few other kits from York Show and were intended to be an intro to brass kits.

The instructions encourage the use of cyano as the method of fixation, and Iím sure that would have been quicker, however I fancied a go at soldering it together and it still didnít take long at all. The instructions are great, the etch is thoughtfully put together and I found that it constructed nicely with the soldering being surprisingly easy (Iím not used to building brass kits). I thought the inclusion of the tiny piece of pipe for the chimney pot a nice touch and it even comes with glazing. I soldered this in place after reeming out the top of the chimney stack a touch. What I really love about this crisp little model is the ability to have the door ajar.

Itís had a wash and brush up in the sink to remove any oils and Iíll prime it this evening then possibly paint it tomorrow.





Thanks for the comments. It's encouraging me to post and model more  :thumbsup:
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #66 on: November 10, 2018, 06:47:05 pm »
Thank you for this latest update, Richard. It looks very good and will be even better spray and handpainted then weathered. A brass kit-built building makes a nice change from the usual cardboard or plastic (which I use) ones.

Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #67 on: November 10, 2018, 09:01:16 pm »
Thank you for this latest update, Richard. It looks very good and will be even better spray and handpainted then weathered. A brass kit-built building makes a nice change from the usual cardboard or plastic (which I use) ones.

Thanks Chris. I look forward to painting it, though it'll be the first building I've done so I might need to do a bit of research first! I've just primed it and the various parts are drying.

I must remember to glaze it before fixing the floor in place!!
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #68 on: November 10, 2018, 09:18:20 pm »
I thought the inclusion of the tiny piece of pipe for the chimney pot a nice touch and it even comes with glazing. I soldered this in place after reeming out the top of the chimney stack a touch.

Have to say a glazed chimney is a new one for me ??? ;)


Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #69 on: November 11, 2018, 09:27:34 am »
I thought the inclusion of the tiny piece of pipe for the chimney pot a nice touch and it even comes with glazing. I soldered this in place after reeming out the top of the chimney stack a touch.

Have to say a glazed chimney is a new one for me ??? ;)

 :laughabovepost: It's been a long week!
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #70 on: November 11, 2018, 10:27:29 am »
As Iíve said previously, one reason for buying some code 40 was so that I could model some NE coal drops. I think Iíd have really struggled with code 55 due to the height of the rail. Anyway, Iíve had a lot of fun building the coal drops and am delighted to be able to present my work so far.

I did quite a bit of digging around the internet to find as many prototypes as possible and assess what form I would like my drops to take and the feasibility of the different designs. Firstly, I was in luck, in that coal drops appear to be a mostly North Eastern feature and that they took two main forms. Either the rail was taken up an incline to the drops and the coal released from above ground level, or the drops were on the same level as the railway and coal dropped down to lower ground level; for example, if the railway went over a road via a bridge, there maybe some drops next to the road. Due to my baseboard design, I opted for the former.

The next step was to find specific examples. From my research, itís fair to say that whilst there seem to be two main types, there was an awful lot of variation. Since my railway is fictitious, I decided I would take elements from various prototypes so that I could model something convincing but also make something that I was able to complete without too much trouble.

First stop, and my favourite from all my research is Alston. Linked from Ernieís Railway Archive (HERE) on Flickr. Of note to me was the stone construction, the timber board walks, fencing and buffer stops, the steps up and walled and gated enclosure. The office and weighbridge appear to be on the way out of the goods yard. As an aside, part of the reason my research took so long was because I found so many pictures that were a joy to look through. The old steam era pictures in black and white are an age gone by and full of intrigue and mystery (to me at least)!

https://flic.kr/p/KgQBYR
https://flic.kr/p/27xUE2z

Secondly is Slaggyford. This shot is nice and close up so that you can see the rail has been Ďpinnedí into huge timbers which have been chamfered or worn away from the dropping coal (I have no idea which, Iím just making observations). There are cross-timbers connecting the long beams and the whole structure sits, again, on stone which separates the cells. Either side of the track you can see nicely the boarding for men to walk along. This is also a single-track example, which seem to be less common.

https://flic.kr/p/28VNdZD
https://flic.kr/p/27xUxJp

Next is Amotherby, seen HERE. What I like about this shot is the evidence of how the sleepers sit in the earth of the incline. Iím not sure if there was ever ballast there but there isnít much to see from the photo. Iíd like to try and model this Ďworní kind of appearance.

I also looked at Beverley, Leyburn, Gaisgill and Hexham all of which had their similarities. I used THIS thread on the other place for some colour pictures of Hexham which helped with painting and weathering.

With some nice examples in hand, I had to think about how I was going to build my model. I had some sections of stone walling which was the right height and type of stone block. Iíd use this for the main supports and division of the coal cells. These are made from plaster so needed some sanding back so that they sat level. I had enough space to allow for a realistic incline, although I decided to ease this further by removing the foam underlay.



I then decided how big I wanted the cells to be and thought Iíd mark out and cut a base structure from Plastikard with the view to gluing individual chairs into drilled holes in the plastic, then feeding the rail in. I abandoned this idea due to the lack of integrity of the plastic and because it was so thin, it in no way would represent the thick timbers I was trying emulate.



Strength was important to me, given that further house moves are likely but also because there wouldnít be any sleepers to keep everything in-gauge Ė I wasnít looking to film an episode of Thomas the Tank Engine where some troublesome trucks fell through the middle of the track! I decided to use some 3mm PCB sheet which I thought Iíd be able to solder the lengths of rail to keeping everything in 2mm and strong too. The downside of this would be that there would be no representation of chairs, however, looking at Slaggyford the pins used to fix the rail to the beams would be barely visible on in N gauge so Iím going to omit them. You can see Iíve used a small piece of wood and a foam board ramp for the track to sit on. It took a bit of time to cut the thin lengths of PCB with a razor saw accurately. I filed the inner edges to give them the chamfer from Slaggford.



As youíve seen from my video, handsfree shunting is important to me so I needed to factor this into the build. To facilitate this Iíve moved the wooden support back and added another piece of wall with the fist row of stones cut off and a notch cut out of the next piece of supporting wall. This is to allow the Dapol magnet to fit flush with the top of the drops and so that itís level Ė otherwise weíre back to that episode of Thomas! Here you can see Iíve glued down three lengths of wall, cut the ends off four other pieces of wall (so that I have the end on detail) and fixed these to form the coal cells. Iíve also started the painting process using a similar method to my station platform edging from a few posts back.



This image shows the stone just two coats in but also a display of the colours used to achieve the final thing. I used various colours and shades, mostly in wash form, to try and get a realistic variation to the stone. When looking at photos of the real thing, I was constantly surprised just how un-black they were. Had I not looked at pictures Iíd have painted the stone very dark thinking that the coal dust would mark the stone badly Ė apparently not.



The PCB was primed and painted dark brown, then a black wash was applied as weathering.



Meanwhile the top surface was rubbed down with a fine wet and dry sand paper ready for tinning and soldering of the rail. The underside of the rail was also filed and tinned.







The soldered rail and PCB in situ. The soldering was more of a pain than Iíd have hoped for. It was impossible to solder the entire rail at once given how quickly it cools which meant it was a little difficult to get flat and straight, especially given the delicacy of the track.



The planked walkways on top of the drops were important to get right as it was what Iíd see the most. Iíd considered scoring some plastikard, as I know other people have used this technique to produce similar things but that just didnít look right. Iím not sure if people know of a guide or if there is a certain type of material that lends itself to this? I have some PCB sleepers from the 2mm Association which seemed perfect. I used Easitrac glue, a little at a time and then placed each sleeper, one at a time trying to get small gaps in between them to replicate the drops at Gaisgill where the planks look warped and shrunk from years out in the elements.



I think I used about 80 or so in the end!



And again in situ.



And finally painted. I used a brown wash initially, allowing the beige of the fibreglass to show through in places, then a black wash to weather.

I used pieces of balsa wood to form the beginnings of the embankment and shaved them to a rough shape. The two flat long pieces above the embankment is to ease the decline to the brewery.



The last thing Iíve done, so far, is to add Das clay so smooth out the land. Iíll be adding more of this but I ran out. Iím aware the wagon is the wrong type to be sat up there but itís nice to see something on the top anyway. I havenít tried shunting up some wagons yet as Iíve yet to wire in the track and preceding point. Possibly something for today. The piece of track behind the drops is a private siding to the brewery. From the centre of the layout this section looks interesting as you can obviously see the decline to the brewery against the incline of the drops. I'll have to get a picture of it at some point.



Signing off.
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #71 on: November 11, 2018, 11:02:07 am »
The coal drops are a real work of art, Richard. Many thanks for this detailed update.

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #72 on: November 11, 2018, 09:29:15 pm »
The coal drops are a real work of art, Richard. Many thanks for this detailed update.

Thanks so much Chris!!
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #73 on: November 13, 2018, 03:56:21 pm »
Öand now for something completely different!

In the last twelve months Iíve bought a new Farish class 40 and 108, both with sound. I was initially ambivalent about sound until hearing it for myself (though I admit my appetite had been whetted via YouTube) and now Iím hooked. What I wasnít expecting was how much fun it is to drive the loco in a more prototypical fashion. It takes a little bit of time to get your head around but once youíve got it, itís great!

This got me lusting after sound in the rest of my fleet. However, this would be prohibitively expensive. After some research, I thought I should probably have a go at this myself. It seems to be well within the abilities of a lot of modellers and Iíve learned an awful lot during my layout build so far. Why not give it a go?! My wife said I have a lot of locos so if I blew one up it didnít matter!!!  :goggleeyes:

I chose the newer tooling Farish 4F. Partly because theyíre a favourite loco but mainly because I found a walk-through guide in Hornby Magazine August 2015 and bought this via an app so I could have a read through. The guide is written by Paul Chetter who seems to be one of the experts in this field. I have 3 4Fs - a BR variant and two Midlanders from the Landship Train pack. If I could convert one, I could hone my skills on the other two. Here are some pictures of the conversion.

The tender just pulls off:



The PCBs are removed, and the pick ups and motor wires are de-soldered:







The speaker:





The naked Zimo MX648:



Removing excess wires:





The recommendation was to use Zimo MX648R decoders with a sugarcube speaker. I bought some Kapton tape from ebay after recommendations from other forum goers HERE.















The whole process was an eveningís work, much quicker than expected. It was also easier than I thought it would be. But most importantly I had a lot of fun doing it!

However, feeling pleased that Iíd completed my first sound conversion, it wasnít to be the Champagne bottle smashing event I thought it would be. I craned her onto the rails, applied power and all I got was seconds worth of jittery movement. After some have-a-go diagnostics, I found my first problem was that the quartering was out. I fixed this by removing the wheelset from the chassis and rolling it up and down to see where it was binding, then, with a small screwdriver, and holding one side of the axle, I turned the other with the screwdriver in the spokes of the wheel. Whilst she was in pieces, I took the opportunity to clean off the excess lube that was around the pickups and, of course, the wheels themselves.

The running was better after this but a long way off acceptable, so I turned my attention to the tender. I removed the wheels, cleaned them and the pickups with IPA. With the wheels out I could see that one of the wires that rubs against the pick up bar (?) wasn't doing any rubbing at all. So I altered the position of this and put the wheels back in. After this, the sound and slow speed running was really nice. After finishing my first conversion and loco maintenance successfully, I converted my other two 4Fs the following day. It was interesting to note that my other Midland 4F suffered exactly the same problems as the first, whilst the BR version was perfect from the outset.





Credit has to go to @pauliebanger not only for his brilliant sound ProtoDrive project but also for the guide as I wouldnít have had the confidence to give this a go without it nor to try and figure a way to do it on my own. [Just a happy customer etc. etc.]

I haven't had chance for any real trials yet but I'll be sure to post when I do. Maybe even another dodgy video.  :beers:



Choo Choo
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

Offline RichardBattersby

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Re: Askham Battersby MKII - NE / Midland Modular Layout
« Reply #74 on: Yesterday at 09:51:55 pm »
The 4Fs head out to do their first bit of shunting:



(Apologies for the lack of landscape)
Richard
Askham Battersby MKII - NE/Midland Modular Layout

"We don't stop playing because we get old, we get old because we stop playing."

 

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