!!

Not Registered?

Welcome!  Please register to view all of the new posts and forum boards - some of which are hidden to guests.  After registering and gaining 10 posts you will be able to sell and buy items on our N'porium.

If you have any problems registering, then please check your spam filter before emailing us.  Hotmail users seem to find their emails in the Junk folder.


Thanks for reading,
The NGF Staff.

Author Topic: Abbreviations  (Read 15204 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dodger

  • Trade Count: (+4)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 12791
  • Posts: 984
  • Country: england
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #60 on: May 09, 2014, 07:37:18 pm »
Back in the eighties I used to work for a sign company. We had a contract to supply BR metal plates with the letters DEP in black on a yellow background. I have seen them attached to overhead masts but I still don't know what the letters mean or stand for.

DEP plates indicated the OHLE structure with Designated Earth Points used to earth the live parts of the overhead line to ground when it was isolated for engineering or any other work that could encroach on the safety clearances.

Dodger

Offline Jack

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 22493
  • Posts: 1704
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #61 on: March 29, 2015, 07:38:33 pm »
Apologises for bringing an old thread back to life but I came across this web page that might be very useful to some newer members. I've bookmarked it.

http://www.scot-rail.co.uk/page/glossary#H
Today's Experts were yesterday's Beginners :)

Offline 25901JFM

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 23462
  • Posts: 154
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #62 on: January 31, 2016, 09:50:58 am »
It gets even more mind-numbing with JJA (my autoballasters are called JJA) and TEA (my weathered china clay bullets are called TEA, I think) etc.
I think you'll find they are TIA, TEA are 100tone/102tonne oil tanks. (or a cuppa  :thumbsup:)

TEA is correct for some of the Silver bullets.  The last ones used on the Burngullow - Irvine flow and also on the Quidhampton trips were TEA's numbered NACO 891xx.  I believe these replaced the original ones which were numbered using the international number system not sure of the TOPS code but guessing these were the TIA's.  The Dapol ones I have are numbered using the international numbering system and I guess are models of the original ones that were used on the Irvine trains.

John

Offline rogercrossley

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 46
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #63 on: January 31, 2016, 11:45:33 am »
I used to ban my people from using abbreviations and acronyms in papers and memos. It's easy to put each into the 'autocorrect' function the first time you use it: thereafter you can type in the acronym but the full version is printed. This way you avoid the use of acronyms as 'jargon', a way of confusing the uninitiated and keeping arcane knowledge secret. Of course, there's a difference between jargon and the legitimate specificity of difficult terminology, but that doesn't justify sprinkling a text with secret acronyms.

Roger

Offline BR Signalman

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 20485
  • 2mm Association Number: 5110
  • Posts: 27
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #64 on: June 08, 2016, 02:56:36 pm »
What about "CO" applied on engineers wagons,I was told it meant construction but what does that say about the wagon. Wouldn't all engineers wagons be construction? ??? :confused1:

In his book on Department Rolling Stock (basically anything to do with track work/engineering) David Larkin tells us that the "O" refers to the braking system (A = Air braked, V = Vacuum braked, O = unfitted, (hand brake fitted only) but gives no clue as to the meaning of "C". He does mention that "Other lettering and sundry coloured symbols" can be found.

 The CO in a circle I think you will find, stands for "Construction Only" to ensure it wasn't used for Revenue traffic. As you rightly say, the A,O,V bits are TOPS codes for braking systems placed after the 2 letter wagon description

Offline railsquid

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 25547
  • Posts: 4115
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • My model railway website
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #65 on: December 07, 2016, 03:43:06 pm »
I'm cataloguing  my sprawling collection of BR coaches, I have a Farish BG (cat. number 374-042, InterCity livery) bearing the running number 92002 and a code "NEX", what does this mean/stand for? Newspaper EXpress?
"Eigatani Tetsudo" - Japanese and other trains (planning), featuring:

Offline Newportnobby

  • Global Moderator
  • Trade Count: (+59)
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • N Gauge Society Number: 21962
  • Posts: 27958
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #66 on: December 07, 2016, 04:13:28 pm »
I also have a Royal Mail BG ex Farish Poole reference 0787 with the running number 92212NEX.
I've tried Googling but been unsuccessful :(

Offline mervyn

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 14644
  • Posts: 17
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #67 on: December 07, 2016, 04:42:55 pm »
DEP Means Designated Earth Point as put on overhead masts HTH Mervyn...

Offline Steven B

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 12107
  • Posts: 449
  • Country: gb
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #68 on: December 07, 2016, 05:00:09 pm »
I also have a Royal Mail BG ex Farish Poole reference 0787 with the running number 92212NEX.

The NEX part is the TOPS code for a dual braked BG rated at 100mph. 92212 is its unique running number.

The "N" part is used for non-passenger carrying coaching stock. The second letter denotes the sub-type:

NA   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NC   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with shelving for newspapers)         
ND    Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NE    Bogie Brake Van 100mph (with gangways)
NF   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (no gangways)   
NH   Bogie Brake Van 110mpg (with gangways)   
NJ   General Utility Van 90mph         
NK   General Utility Van  90mph (Modified for Brutes) 90mph      
NL   General Utility Van  90mph (with shelving for newspapers) 90mph
NO   4 wheel Covered Carriage Truck 75mph   
NS   TPO Sorting van
NT   TPO storage van
NQ   Parcels and Miscellaneous van 75mph   
NX   General Utility Van (Motorail)   


The final letter is the brake type:
A = air brake only
V = vacuum brake only
X = dual air & vacuum brakes



Happy modelling.

Steven B.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2016, 08:06:35 pm by Steven B »

Offline AndyRA

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 3048
  • Posts: 109
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Facebook
    • YouTube
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #69 on: December 07, 2016, 05:02:19 pm »
As for NEX the X stands for dual braked (air/vacuum). The N, I think, refers to 'Non-passenger. The second letter I'm not sure of, but generally there were sub division of letters according to the make of van. The E could possibly mean ETH (Electric train heat) fitted?

Andy.
If it looks difficult it probably is, but might as well get on with it anyway!

Layout :- West Coast (Southern Section)
http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;su=user;cat=2531;u=5731

Full story and pics at:-
https://www.facebook.com/WestCoastSouthernSection/

Offline D1042 Western Princess

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1747
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #70 on: December 07, 2016, 07:38:49 pm »
I also have a Royal Mail BG ex Farish Poole reference 0787 with the running number 92212NEX.

The NEX part is the TOPS code for a dual braked BG rated at 100mph. 92212 is its unique running number.

The "N" part is used for non-passenger carrying coaching stock. The second letter denotes the sub-type:

NA   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NC   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with shelving for newspapers)         
ND    Bogie Brake Van 90mph (with gangways)   
NE    Bogie Brake Van 100mph (with gangways)
NF   Bogie Brake Van 90mph (no gangways)   
NH   Bogie Brake Van 110mpg (with gangways)   
NJ   General Utility Van 90mph         
NK   General Utility Van  90mph (Modified for Brutes) 90mph      
NL   General Utility Van  90mph (with shelving for newspapers) 90mph   NO   4 wheel Covered Carriage Truck 75mph   
NS   TPO Sorting van
NT   TPO storage van
NQ   Parcels and Miscellaneous van 75mph   
NX   General Utility Van (Motorail)   


The final letter is the brake type:
A = air brake only
V = vacuum brake only
X = dual air & vacuum brakes



Happy modelling.

Steven B.

Thank you Steven, as it saved my typing finger  from putting all that in myself.
If it's not a Diesel Hydraulic then it's not a real locomotive.

Offline Big bad John

  • Trade Count: (+2)
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • N Gauge Society Number: 26400
  • Posts: 403
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Facebook
    • Awards
Re: Abbreviations
« Reply #71 on: December 07, 2016, 08:48:33 pm »
Just read the whole of this thread and noted this quote from Newportnobby
Quote
It does make you wonder who came up with the letter K for 'compartment' and 'corridor' ;D
Mind you, it could be the same person who devised the three 'R's' (reading, writing and arithmetic)
At the school I went to the three R's' meant reading writing and rubbing out  :D

 

Please Support Us!
May Goal: £55.00
Due Date: May 31
Total Receipts: £55.00
Below Goal: £0.00
Site Currency: GBP
100% 
May Donations


Advertise Here