N Gauge Forum

General Category => N Gauge Discussion => American N Scale => Topic started by: ngaugepaul on November 21, 2017, 04:43:47 pm

Title: Train operators in Alberta
Post by: ngaugepaul on November 21, 2017, 04:43:47 pm
My knowledge of the US and Canadian rail scene is somewhat limited but I am aware that locomotives owned by one firm can be found working a long way from what would be regarded as their "home" territory.

Does anyone have any advice as what locos would be found in recent years ideally in Alberta and the neighbouring states presumably in addition to Canadian Pacific and Canadian National ? For instance would you find BNSF or Union Pacific locos that far north ?

Many thanks in anticipation of your replies.
Title: Re: Train operators in Alberta
Post by: Rich_S on November 21, 2017, 10:15:42 pm
My knowledge of the US and Canadian rail scene is somewhat limited but I am aware that locomotives owned by one firm can be found working a long way from what would be regarded as their "home" territory.

Does anyone have any advice as what locos would be found in recent years ideally in Alberta and the neighbouring states presumably in addition to Canadian Pacific and Canadian National ? For instance would you find BNSF or Union Pacific locos that far north ?

Many thanks in anticipation of your replies.

Yes, you will find BNSF and UP on Canadian Pacific and Canadian National trains in Western Canada. You'll also find Kansas City Southern and even leasing units like CEFX.  Now it will be less likely to find eastern roads like NS or CSX in Western Canada, I'm not going to say it doesn't happen, just less likely. You'll find the eastern roads like NS and CSX in Eastern Canada. You'll also see CN and CP units running on NS and CSX in the eastern USA. It makes more sense to keep the locomotives on a train until it reaches a major terminal on the other railroad, then having to stop and swap power where the two lines join. Just the opposite will happen with the train traveling in the opposite compass direction, so the locomotive usage averages out between the two companies.
Title: Re: Train operators in Alberta
Post by: texhorse on December 02, 2017, 06:04:48 pm
That's answered a question I always wanted to answer, Rich.  I wondered whether locos were taken off a train halfway through a journey.  For instance if a train was going from Seattle to New York, with BNSF power on the front, would those orange locos go all the way to New York, or would they be taken off?

I guess they'd need refuelling at some point along the way, so that may be the opportunity to put CSX or NS on the front, when BNSF goes for fuel.

Is that correct?

Andy
UK
Title: Re: Train operators in Alberta
Post by: Webbo on December 02, 2017, 09:08:52 pm
My sister lives in Salmon Arm which is on the CP mainline in south central British Columbia. When I visit her I sit and watch the trains go by from her back balcony. On this line most locos are CP naturally, but I see quite a few UP and CEFX units as well.

BNSF runs a railway line up from Washington State into Vancouver and its nearby coal port. So, on those lines there are BNSF locos as well as an Amtrack service.

Webbo
Title: Re: Train operators in Alberta
Post by: Rich_S on December 02, 2017, 10:48:28 pm
That's answered a question I always wanted to answer, Rich.  I wondered whether locos were taken off a train halfway through a journey.  For instance if a train was going from Seattle to New York, with BNSF power on the front, would those orange locos go all the way to New York, or would they be taken off?

I guess they'd need refuelling at some point along the way, so that may be the opportunity to put CSX or NS on the front, when BNSF goes for fuel.

Is that correct?

Andy
UK

Hi Andy, it has to do with mileage and fuel. Where I work in Conway, Pennsylvania we regularly receive trains with Union Pacific, BNSF, Canadian Pacific and Canadian National  locomotives. We are about 500 miles from Chicago. What happens in Chicago is, NS places a NS locomotive as the leader on the train and it continues to us. Since we are a crew change point and major hump yard, all trains that need to be reclassified will have all the locomotives taken off the train. When the train is reclassified, serviced NS locomotives will be added to the train and it will continues East. The foreign road locomotives (UP, BNSF, CN, CP) locomotives are then added to a train headed back West toward Chicago. On most HOT Intermodal trains*, the foreign road locomotives are left on the train all the way to the trains destination.

*HOT Intermodal means - Very High Priority. Intermodal trains are double stacks and piggyback (Trailer on Flatcar or Container On Flatcar)
   
Title: Re: Train operators in Alberta
Post by: Gilles_44 on January 07, 2018, 08:52:02 am
My knowledge of the US and Canadian rail scene is somewhat limited but I am aware that locomotives owned by one firm can be found working a long way from what would be regarded as their "home" territory.

Does anyone have any advice as what locos would be found in recent years ideally in Alberta and the neighbouring states presumably in addition to Canadian Pacific and Canadian National ? For instance would you find BNSF or Union Pacific locos that far north ?

Many thanks in anticipation of your replies.


If you go to the following website:  http://www.railpictures.net (http://www.railpictures.net)  you will find picture of train in Alberta so if you check picture you can find the railroad who run in Alberta.


PS: Rich_S: your explaination is very interesting. :thankyousign:

Regards,
Gilles
Title: Re: Train operators in Alberta
Post by: anaes20 on January 25, 2018, 11:59:23 pm
I travelled on the Canadian in 2014 from Toronto to Vancouver.  As the train approached Vancouver's Pacific Central Station there was a large yard with a wide assortment of locos of almost every Class 1 railroad in attendance - and NS and CSX were well-represented!  The last section of line into the station is actually owned by BNSF.  I was told that at the time a lot of container traffic had been diverted through Vancouver instead of US West Coast ports and this accounted for the yard being so busy.  Features like this make North American railroads / railways very interesting. 

PS Roberts Bank is Vancouver's coal shipment facility, located to the South of downtown.  On another note Alberta's only neighbouring state is Montana, to the South; Canada is subdivided into provinces (10) and territories (3).

Omar / anaes20.