N Gauge Forum

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: port perran on November 21, 2017, 08:26:55 am

Title: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 21, 2017, 08:26:55 am
Rather than “clog up” my main thread with a layout inspired Christmas thriller, I’m going to start a mystery tale here which will continue (on and off) over the coming weeks.
A tale of intrigue-hopefully.
Watch this space.......
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Bealman on November 21, 2017, 08:30:53 am
Ok....  Looking forward to it..... I hope!   ;) :thumbsup: :beers:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: weave on November 21, 2017, 08:45:41 am
Excellent news Martin and good idea to keep it separate (I sometimes lose track with the stories as it is).

Will it be just be text or pics as well?

Anyway, looking forward to it too.

Cheers weave  :beers:

Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 21, 2017, 08:55:45 am
It’ll be text with pictures where they are appropriate.
I hope to publish episode one later.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on November 21, 2017, 09:07:56 am
Rather than “clog up” my main thread with a layout inspired Christmas thriller, I’m going to start a mystery tale here which will continue (on and off) over the coming weeks.
A tale of intrigue-hopefully.
Watch this space.......

... I'm watching!

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Evans on November 21, 2017, 09:22:53 am
Looking forward to this.  :thumbsup:
chris
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: robert shrives on November 21, 2017, 01:53:45 pm
Brilliant, is it now time to start the spoiler froth,,, police , beer, good railway folk win out in the end.

Robert
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: daffy on November 21, 2017, 02:00:24 pm
Very mysterious :hmmm:

I'll have to keep an eye out for this. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 21, 2017, 05:11:09 pm
Episode 1
School days in Port Perran in 1962 finish at four in the afternoon. Young Dennis Steele, being an avid rail enthusiast always tries to make a point of pausing on the footbridge overlooking the station on his way home in the hope of seeing something unusual.
Today, instead of the familiar and somewhat tatty ex GW Siphon G van being stabled in the headshunt immediately behind the small building known locally as “Harry’s Bar”, there was a gleaming restaurant car in SR green livery.
Harry’s Bar is so called in remembrance of Harry Polwithen who was a very popular platform porter at Port Perran and used to frequent the premises of the GW Staff Association, for a pint or two once his shift was completed. Harry unfortunately passed away some years ago but, being so popular, his memory lingers on.
Young Dennis was, of course, somewhat intrigued by the presence of the restaurant car so called into the station where he found, as expected, his uncle Les Steele who is a present day porter.  “Ah, ‘tis a special evenin’ young Dennis. Lots of very 'portant folks will be ‘rivin’ by special train later for a meetin’ in ‘Arry’s Bar. T’aint vury big in thur an’ they’m ‘avin sum posh nosh so that thur dinin’ coach ave been sent down from Wadebridge so they can cook up a propur meal fer the folk. Thas all I d’know sept the special train be arrivin’ ‘bout zix thiry”.
Young Denis ran home as fast as he could in the hope that his tea would be ready and that he’d be allowed out straight after to see the special train arrive…………
(http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/58/230-211117171258.jpeg) (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=58408)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: robert shrives on November 21, 2017, 05:23:14 pm
Well that is the appetite wetted with talk of posh nosh!
Robert   
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: colpatben on November 21, 2017, 05:54:04 pm
Orf for mi Parsty 'n Chips  :food:

Back by zix thiry

Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on November 21, 2017, 06:21:58 pm
Excellent photograph, Martin.  And a very nice 14xx 0-4-2T (I think) in the background.

Thank you.

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 21, 2017, 07:06:57 pm
Episode Two
Dennis was a little disappointed on arriving at home to discover that his evening meal  would not be ready until six. This meant that he wouldn’t be back at the station by 6-30 to see the special train arrive. He was, however, delighted that the meal was to be ham, egg and chips, his all time favourite and with fresh eggs provided by Mrs Williams from next door and thick cut ham from Braddons the butchers in town.
The meal finished Dennis was delighted to be allowed down to the station, “Providing you’re back by seven mind” added mother with a warning wag of her finger.
On arrival at the station, the train had already arrived with two pristine chocolate and cream carriages backed into the bay platform. A lovely green liveried 45XX prarie tank was simmering just outside the small shed having presumably brought the train in from Wadebridge.
In fact the train had departed Truro much earlier, travelled up to Wadebridge via the Port Perran avoiding line, Quintrell Downs Junctions and Trepol Bay before arriving at Wadebridge where the prarie tank ran around its train for the journey back to Port Perran.
Dennis could see the very smartly dressed guests making their way from the station towards the GW Staff Association building. Dennis knew none of them but they certainly looked to be important judging by their appearance. Dennis counted some forty people in all.  Who they all were was a complete mystery. Unfortunately Uncle Les had finished his shift at six so there was no one to ask. Except……….who were those two men by the entrance, one with a camera ?
Dennis’ normal shyness was outweighed by curiosity so he plucked up courage to ask, only to discover that it was Tom Wallace, reporter with the Western Morning News and his photographer Terry  iles. Both were names he recognised from the newspaper which arrived in the letterbox at home before seven each morning.
“Those people are all here for a very special meeting” said Tom.  “They are important figures from the railway and from local business organisations. All here to discuss something to do with Special Train Services for Christmas I’ve heard”.  With that Dennis realised that it was ten to seven….he must run to be home on time.
(http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/58/230-211117190936.jpeg) (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=58411)

(http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/58/230-211117192226.jpeg) (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=58415)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: cornish yorkie on November 21, 2017, 08:22:12 pm
 :hellosign: & thank you Martin excellent story, we need to know more about these strange goings on.    :greatpicturessign:
     regards Derek.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 21, 2017, 08:39:57 pm
:hellosign: & thank you Martin excellent story, we need to know more about these strange goings on.    :greatpicturessign:
     regards Derek.
Thanks Derek.
The next update should  be tomorrow.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Evans on November 22, 2017, 01:03:57 pm
 :thankyousign: for an excellent story and great pictures. Cant wait for the next part now.
Regards chris
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 22, 2017, 03:28:45 pm
Episode Three
Dennis made it home in time, pleased he’d seen the arrival of the various people but also intrigued as to what the meeting was all about.

At precisely 7-15 Lady Constance Treliver, Chairwoman of Truro Chamber of Commerce called the meeting to order. The small bar room of the Great Western Staff Association building at Port Perran was packed to capacity with invited guests all eager to hear what Lady Constance had to say.
“Ladies and Gentlemen, good evening and welcome”, she began, “Some of you will know the reason for this meeting whilst others will only have the vaguest idea. We at Truro Chamber of Commerce are eager to promote the City of Truro as the leading retail centre within Cornwall. To this end, we have been working with many local retailers and business owners in order to fund what we hope will be the largest outdoor  display of Christmas illumination and decoration within the South West. This all in an endeavour to bring more shoppers to the City in the run up to Christmas”.    Lady Constance allowed herself a short pause in order that the assembled guests could digest what she had to say. “Furthermore, we have discussed various plans and ideas in order to facilitate better transportation for the local population throughout Cornwall thus enabling them to reach Truro more easily. That is where all of you come in as representatives of local towns and of local transport providers and support organisations. We have representatives from local towns, from British railways, from Autobus operators, from the Cornish Locomotive Preservation Group and the Association for the Promotion of Cornwall’s Railways. What we would like to organise is special Christmas Trains and buses into Truro providing a journey with a festive theme. We’ll now take a break in the special restaurant car which is parked outside where we can mingle and discuss ideas and suggestions informally. Food to the very finest   standard has been provided by the Cornish Arms. Please do enjoy”.
With that everyone adjourned to the carriage, eager to discuss ideas and plans. George Tehidy, deputy regional manager for British Rail (SW) had some very interesting ideas which he wished to discuss in order to promote special trains throughout December.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Newportnobby on November 22, 2017, 03:51:12 pm
To this end, we have been working with many local retailers and business owners in order to fund what we hope will be the largest outdoor  display of Christmas illumination and decoration within the South West.

Knowing how much you love electrics/electronics I am just wondering how you'll provide a photo of the finished illuminations, Martin :worried:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 22, 2017, 03:53:19 pm
To this end, we have been working with many local retailers and business owners in order to fund what we hope will be the largest outdoor  display of Christmas illumination and decoration within the South West.

Knowing how much you love electrics/electronics I am just wondering how you'll provide a photo of the finished illuminations, Martin :worried:
Good point!
However we are just on the preamble. The mystery will be very much related to a train journey in due course.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Gary Burcombe on November 22, 2017, 06:23:24 pm
ooh, murder on the Cornish Christmas Express perhaps, how exciting!
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 22, 2017, 07:59:31 pm
ooh, murder on the Cornish Christmas Express perhaps, how exciting!
We shall have to wait and see.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 24, 2017, 07:39:30 pm
Episode Four

George Tehidy was eager to promote the railway network in North and West Cornwall as many lines were, of course, under severe threat of closure. However, moves were afoot in various circles (not least the efforts emanating from the Cant Cove area) in order to try to  keep the railways running.  He could forsee that making a success of potential Christmas Special workings might well go a long way towards helping to prove the viability of the railway in the long term.
George already had the support of the CLPG and the Association for the Promotion of Cornwall’s Railways both organisations being keen to help in any way possible. He knew that both organisations were devoted to the continued success of railways throughout Cornwall.
The banquet, laid on by the Chamber of Commerce, with the invaluable support of local businesses, was a huge success. During the course of the evening, George Tehidy took the opportunity to court support from representatives of Cornwall County Council, the local Urban District Councils, the local Round Table and important representatives of various local businesses.
When the meeting re-convened, back in Harry’s Bar, George could allow himself a congratulatory pint of Summer Lightning.  His ideas were welcomed by everyone and he had offers of help and support from all quarters. The Cornwall Christmas Specials, as he hoped the trains would be called were set to become a reality. 
All he had to do now was the small matter of settling the details with his colleagues at BR (many of whom were already on side). By no means an easy task by any means but one which he was confident he could achieve.
With any luck trains could be running in early December.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 27, 2017, 05:18:10 pm

Episode Five
George Tehidy wasted little time in organising the various special trains. After several hastily convened meetings with senior staff it was agreed that one return train daily would run from selected locations into Truro at peak shopping times. Each train to include a buffet car, selling the usual Christmas Fayre. Trains to run Monday to Friday with a special train on Saturday to include Father Christmas. It was agreed that trains would run to Truro from Wadebridge, Liskeard, Falmouth and Penzance and that coaching stock would be either GW Chocolate and Cream or Southern Green. The CLPG had been approached with a view to utilising some of their preserved but in service locomotives. As a general rule, all trains to be steam hauled whenever possible. The first such trains to commence as from the first Monday in December and run up until and including Christmas Eve.
The publicity department at BR were to ensure maximum publicity working in conjunction with the new local television news offices.   BBC South West agreed to travel n board the very first train from Wadebridge to Truro on Monday December 3rd which was due to depart Wadebridge at 10.45am. Various connecting services from local towns would be duly arranged.

Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 28, 2017, 07:16:04 pm
Episode Six
In the two weeks leading up to December 3rd, there was frantic activity not only amongst BR Staff  in the regional office but at all the various supporting organisation. All eager to make the Christmas Special trains throughout Cornwall a success.
Finally, on Monday December 3rd hundreds of people had gathered at Wadebridge station to witness the first of the special trains which would be made up of five carriages including a buffet car. BBC (South West) were there to record the event and the local silver band were present playing all the favourite seasonal carols. The station was especially bedecked with bunting and a 20 foot tall Christmas tree which had been decorated by local schoolchildren.
At 10.15 a specially cleaned 02 tank propelled the stock into the station. This was followed at precisely 10-30 by a Southern Railway T9 restored to full main line working order as part of a collaborative agreement with the CLPG. The T9 would work the train right through to Truro. Many of the passengers on this very first special train were invited guests, dignitaries and supporters of the project but some 100 tickets had been made available to the general public on a first come first served basis. These had sold out within hours on the day they were announced.
Various speeches were made but then finally, at exactly 10-45, Driver Ted Williams eased the train out of the station en-route to its first stop at Trepol Bay.  A series of celebratory  detonators were laid on the track at the end of Wadebridge’s Platform One. These exploded loudly, accompanied by a rousing cheer from those on the platforms, as the train gently gathered speed. Ted Williams shouted to his fireman , Dave Rule, “What a celebration mate, ain’t seen nothin’ like it since Lizzie’s Cor’nation  ……tis an ‘ansome day, we should ‘ave a decent run all the way inta Truro”.
Some twenty invited guests we expected to board the train at Trepol Bay.  Sophie Tremaine the somewhat wayward daughter of the local butcher, Alun Tremaine, didn’t have a ticket but she was determined to board the train and hitch a free ride into Truro to meet up with her rather unsavoury boyfriend Tommy Weekes……………
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on November 30, 2017, 11:23:18 am
Episode Seven
Sophie Tremaine was well known at Trepol Bay for attempting to board trains without a ticket. For her, it wasn’t the money, more the thrill of trying to get away with it. And she was very adept at that. Knowing that the special train would attract crowds to the station and that the station staff would be preoccupied, Sophie sensed that she had every chance of getting a free ride to Truro to meet young Tommy Weekes.
You never know, thought Sophie with there being a few toffs on the train I may get the chance to snaffle a wallet or purse. It’s not my fault if someone doesn’t put their valuables away properly.
At 11.19, the train pulled into a very busy Trepol Bay platform one. Only a few people would be boarding but nonetheless plenty of locals had popped down to the station to witness the special. As at Wadebridge, the local band was playing carols and a Christmas tree had been erected on the platform. Everyone was in jolly mood, and eager to see that the first of the new Christmas Special got off to a good start on its first day.
Sophie had managed to slip past the ticket inspector at the barrier, something at which she was well practised. She knew that with everything else going on the station staff would be rather preoccupied. Spotting the Mayor, with his wife, on the platform edge, Sophie walked over to them as the train came to a halt. She kept close behind them and stepped aboard un-noticed. All was going very much to plan. Being sharp eyed and quick witted, Sophie immediately saw the mayor’s wallet sitting proud in his back pocket. It wouldn’t be long before it fell to the floor and would be lost. Much better tucked quickly into Sophie’s duffel bag well out of harm’s way. If it fell to the floor you never know who might get hold of it.
The station porters were soon slamming doors and with a shrill whistle from the guard the train was underway at precisely 11.22. Pictured below, just as it started to gather speed.  Driver Williams and fireman Rule happy that time was being kept to the very minute.
Many pictures were taken of the special at Trepol Bay including this one taken as the train arrived.
(http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/58/230-301117112500.jpeg) (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=58743)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 04, 2017, 06:55:32 pm
Episode Eight
“Next stop Port Perran” shouted Ted Williams to his mate. “We should make good time”.
Meanwhile in the carriages everyone was settling down for the journey enjoying free mince pies and mulled wine served from the buffet car. Sophie Tremaine had no ticket of course but she was brazen enough to walk up to the buffet counter for her freebies.  Quick as a flash she noticed that the previous customer had left her purse on the counter. Within a second the purse was safely packed away in Sophie’s bag as she made her way back to her position in the vestibule of the rear carriage, right next to the lavatory, just in case she needed to hide from anyone.
Unbeknown to Sophie, and everyone else, she was not the only petty thief aboard. However, Johnny Pettfifer, a notorious Wadebridge car dealer and well known con man had managed to buy himself a ticket, sitting in the very first coach, immediately behind the engine, along with many of the invited guests.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: TrevL on December 12, 2017, 08:19:40 pm
Just found this, and very enjoyable too. Looking foward to episode 9.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 13, 2017, 04:55:40 pm
For those following this, apologies for the delay in publishing this latest episode.

Episode Nine

Johnny Pettifer (known around Wadebridge simply as “Dodgy John”) looked somewhat out of place amongst the invited guests with his trilby at a jaunty angle on his head and his rather cheap gabardine mack coat with flowing belt. Johnny’s intentions were perfectly honourable today, he was simply travelling to Truro in order to choose an engagement ring for Alice Downs his “young lady”. Johnny fully intended to put his dodgy dealings and petty pilfering behind him in order to settle down to start a family.
The problem for Johnny was that his reputation went before him. Everyone in and around Wadebridge knew that he spelt trouble and was, by and large, he was someone to avoid (unless of course you were in need of a cheap motor!).
Most of the invited guests aboard the first carriage knew Johnny and his reputation and everyone was on their guard. All eyes followed him as he left the carriage to make his way to the buffet……….
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 13, 2017, 07:46:19 pm
Episode Ten
Dodgy John made his way to the buffet where he ordered a bottle of Headland Triple PPP from the rather fetching barmaid Sylvia. John immediately turned on his charm as her ordered his drink, running an admiring eye over Sylvia as she took the bottle from the very bottom shelf.
“Oh, I’m so sorry” said Sylvia “the last customer must have made off with the bottle opener”.
“Oh, I’m sure he didn’t intend to take it” John replied “But fear not, I have one of these new fangled Swiss Knives which includes a bottle opener. Here, let me open the bottle for you”.
Sylvia poured the drink and Dodgy John took a sip or two before heading back to his seat. “I saw that last customer as I came up to the bar. I’ll ask him to return the opener right away”.
With that two things happened at once. Dodgy John, having returned his knife to his pocket headed away from the buffet and into the vestibule whilst the train, approaching Perran Beach Halt, suddenly, and quite unexpectedly, screeched to a halt.

(http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/59/230-131217194829.jpeg) (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=59246)
here the T9 with its train has come to a halt just after crossing Penwinnick Viaduct and running into Perran Beach Halt
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on December 13, 2017, 08:12:26 pm
Thank you very much, Martin, for episodes nine and 10 of this enjoyable story.

And for the charming photograph; the 'T9' is a lovely locomotive.

Best wishes

John (no relation [I hope] to Dodgy John!)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 14, 2017, 12:21:38 pm
Episode Eleven

“What’s happened”, exclaimed fireman Dave Rule, looking out from the footplate both ahead and behind. “Someone’s pulled the communication cord – first time it’s ever happened on a train I’ve been driving” replied Ted Williams. “We’ve come to rest just at Perran Beach Halt. I can’t imagine what’s happened”.   With that guard Tom Tonkiss was hurrying up the track towards the engine. “What’s happened Tom?” enquired driver Williams. “Someone’s pulled the cord in coach two” replied Tonkiss. “I’m just going to jump back aboard to see what’s happened. I’ll ‘phone the signal box first to let them know that we’re stuck on the line. Don’t know how long we’re going to be here”.
Back aboard, Sophie Tremaine, ever alert to possible trouble, locked herself in the vacant toilet in the last coach. In the buffet, Sylvia, the barmaid, got back to her feet after slipping as a result of the violent stop and being surrounded by broken glass.  Dodgy John, who was making his way back to the first carriage made the quick decision to sit down quickly. Seeing just one available seat in coach two he quickly slipped into a seat next to a rather plump lady who seemed startled by his sudden appearance by her side.
Elsewhere aboard the train no one appeared to know what had happened. There was much speculation. However, in the vestibule between the first two carriages it was Harry Thomas, Chairman of the Trepol Bay Chamber of Commerce, who had pulled the Communication Cord. He was now leaning out of the window frantically waving to gain the attention of guard Tonkiss. Tonkiss, however, had his eyes firmly fixed on a door at the rear of the train which was open. He thought he saw someone running very quickly away and around the back of the train. However, he couldn’t be sure. Just then he noticed the urgent waves from Harry Thomas and hurried towards him. “What ever is the matter Sir?” asked Tonkiss, looking up at a very white face peering out of the window above him. “You’d better get up here quick”, stammered Harry “An’ see for yerself”………….
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: cornish yorkie on December 14, 2017, 11:28:25 pm
 :hellosign: Thanks for the story Martin, what ever will they find up there?
      regards Derek.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: weave on December 14, 2017, 11:55:54 pm
:hellosign: Thanks for the story Martin, what ever will they find up there?
      regards Derek.

Maybe he saw this in the buffet car and panicked....

https://gettingreadyfor2015.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/no-pasties-allowed.jpg

Seriously Martin,

Great stuff and looking forward to further instalments.

Cheers weave  :beers:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 15, 2017, 02:20:13 pm
Episode Twelve

“I ‘ave ta get upta the box first to warn the signalman and stop other trains, I’ll be as fast as I can” said Tom Tonkiss.   With that he ran, stumbling as he went, up to the signalbox where signalman Edwin Tull said “What’s the matter Tom – summat up?” “Tis our train – someone pulled the communication cord – don’t know what’s up but you better put all signals at danger right away” replied Tonkiss. “Righto, but I hope it ain’t a big problem, we ‘ave the Wadebridge main liner due from Truro in fifteen minutes” replied the signalman.  With that Tom Tonkiss started to run back towards the train. As he went, he was sure that he felt someone watching him, maybe from behind one of the bushes up on the bankside, he couldn’t be sure. Could it be that person he thought he saw running from the train earlier. He stopped to look around – nothing. All the same, he could feel a pair of eyes watching him.
Tom ran the rest of the way back and up to the point where Harry Thomas was still waving and calling out of the carriage window. “Whatever is it?” enquired the guard.  “Climb up here and you’ll see for yourself man” replied the exasperated Chairman of the local Chamber of Commerce.
Once aboard Tom could hardly believe his eyes as he looked around him. “You’d better summon an ambulance fast” said Harry Thomas, “If it isn’t already too late for the poor devil”……………
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 15, 2017, 02:21:21 pm
:hellosign: Thanks for the story Martin, what ever will they find up there?
      regards Derek.

Maybe he saw this in the buffet car and panicked....

https://gettingreadyfor2015.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/no-pasties-allowed.jpg

Seriously Martin,

Great stuff and looking forward to further instalments.

Cheers weave  :beers:
No pasties on Cornish trains. Whatever next !

Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 17, 2017, 04:47:28 pm
Episode Thirteen
With some trepidation Tom Tonkiss climbed up into the carriage as Harry Thomas made way for him. Laying on the floor, face up, was a rather portly gentleman with what appeared to be a knife protruding from a deep wound in the region of his heart. His shirt and waistcoat were covered in blood which was seeping onto the floor around him.
The guard took just a few seconds to survey the scene and realised that it was up to him to take initial charge of the situation. His first move was to ensure that no one else entered the vestibule area and he also realised that he must ensure that no one disembarked from the train. He was also aware that he must avoid any panic. As such he made the decision to immediately get the train moved forward into Port Perran station. Tom climbed somewhat shakily down from the carriage and made his way forward to the locomotive where he instructed driver Williams to get the train moving but to stop at the next signalbox. “What’s ‘appened?” Enquired the driver. “Tis very bad news” replied Tom Tonkiss, “There’s bin a murder I think”. With that he returned to the carriage and the train got underway again whilst the guard made his way through the train telling all the passengers to remain seated and calm. He also took the precaution of locking all the doors although he had this feeling that the culprit had already left the train.
In ten minutes the train pulled up beside the signalbox. Tom now needed to act quickly……..   
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 18, 2017, 07:12:26 pm
Episode Fourteen
Meanwhile, some 2 miles back along the line there was a decision to be made. Having crept off the train as soon as it stopped, and before anyone knew what was happening, Lenny Trewithen found himself hiding behind a lineside bush. What to do now? He could drop down into Penwinnick Valley, no one would see him there but it was nearly dark now. It would be very difficult to find the path without a torch. However, if he stuck to the railway line and headed in either direction, there was a good chance that someone would see him. Lenny figured that by now people would be looking for him. To make matters fifty times worse, he  realised that the small item he’d secreted in his pocket had gone missing, presumably as he jumped down from the train.
Back at the signalbox, guard Tom Tonkiss had given a summary of events to the signalman. The decision was quickly made to allow the train to proceed into Port Perran station bay platform where all doors would remain firmly locked. The signalman had immediately contacted the police and ambulance services who would meet the train at the station.
Within five minutes the T9 was at rest at the bufferstops awaiting both police and ambulance. Very soon the familiar sound of bells could be heard as police vehicles and two ambulances approached.
Back on the train,  Sophie Tremaine was still in the lavatory where she had locked herself as soon as the train had stopped. Dodgy Johnny Pettifer had returned to his seat in  the first carriage. Sylvia the barmaid, although shaken, was, to her credit, starting to tidy the buffet area. Harry Thomas was still standing by the locked door with the dead body next to him. Word had spread rapidly amongst the rest of the passengers. Rumour and speculation was rife.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 19, 2017, 06:29:38 pm
Episode Fifteen

Sophie Tremaine made her decision. She would leave the lavatory and make her way through the train. She needed to know what was happening. The train had stopped and started several times which was most unusual. Not wishing to draw attention to herself, she hurried through to find a seat and sat quickly down, listening to the animated conversation around her to find out what had happened.
Johnny Pettifer sat quietly in his seat. He had seen nothing happening but felt guilty none the less.
Harry Thomas was still at the window but could now see ambulancemen and police officers approaching along the platform.
Back trackside, Lenny Trewithen realised he had no choice. He had to retrace his steps in order to find the lost item. Without it, he was in trouble, serious trouble. Big Dave Evans would not be happy. He would in fact be distinctly unhappy. Lenny set off into the darkness, puzzled somewhat by the faint and fuzzy light, apparently not moving, ahead of him.
Back at the train, the emergency services were by  now on board much to the relief of Harry Thomas. Sergeant Mike Tate was first to catch sight of the body, “Who is it?” He asked. “I’ve no idea” stammered Harry. “I was just making my way to the buffet when I came across him laying there”.
“Well, someone must know who he is, no one must leave this train until further notice. We have ten men with us, we’ll talk to everyone as soon as we can”. Said Sergeant Tate.

No episode tomorrow or Thursday I’m afraid. Normal service will be resumed on Friday
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 22, 2017, 04:59:14 pm
Episode Sixteen
Sergeant Tate set his team the task of interviewing everyone on board. Surely someone must have seen something. It would be a long process but for the time being no one would be leaving the train.
Back at the lineside, young Dennis Steele, the avid railway enthusiast from Port Perran had been waiting, near to Perran Beach Halt, to see the special pass. He had been tipped off by his Uncle Les who, being a railwayman, was able to supply exact timings. It being late  and getting dark, Dennis was under strict instructions to be home on time for tea. Dennis saw his train but then was intrigued to see it stop suddenly and was then startled to see someone jump down from one of the carriages and run  quickly behind the train before vanishing behind a bush. Dennis could see something laying on the ballast just where the man had jumped out. As the train crept away again, Dennis remained where he was but couldn’t see the man. He didn’t reappear and Dennis wasn’t sure how far he had run.
With no sign of the man, Dennis crept down to the line and quickly picked up the object. It was wrapped in a small green cloth and was surprisingly heavy for its size. Dennis ran back up the bank ready to retrieve his bicycle and pedal home. Just as he was about to leave, he saw the man creeping slowly along the trackside. Feeling that something was very much amiss, Dennis decided to cycle home but would call into the police station to hand in the object and tell someone what he had seen. He decided not to unwrap the object until he reached the safety of the police station.
Back on board the train in Port Perran station, the detectives had largely drawn a blank. No one had seen anything untoward. The police were however very interested in the fact that Sophie Tremaine and Johnny Pettifer were on board. If trouble was afoot then one or both of them were very likely to know something about it. Both however denied having seen anything though Sophie was terrified that the police would look in her bag. Finally, one of the officers interviewd a Miss Emily Price, a seventy two year old spinster who was seated next to the window and very near the vestibule where the body was discovered. Miss Price had heard some sort of argument but more importantly claimed to have seen something that looked remarkably like a knife fly past the window shortly before the train stopped.
Back at the police station, young Dennis was relating his story. He was well known as his Uncle was a retired Constable. Dennis was known as a reliable and thoroughly trustworthy young lad and as such his story was taken very seriously. After listening to Dennis’ account the Serggeant said, “So….we’d better unwrap this small parcel then and see what’s inside”. He carefully unwrapped the green cloth………….
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on December 22, 2017, 07:17:51 pm
I'm enjoying this!

Many thanks, Martin.

All the best.

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 22, 2017, 07:53:03 pm
Episode Seventeen
Sergeant Harris, at the police station, slowly unwrapped the green cloth. Inside was a wooden box, much like a wooden pencil case but a little bigger. Harris carefully slid back the lid. Inside was a gold ingot, glistening in the lamplight. Inscribed at he top was the date 1779 and the wording Eglos Sant Euny. “Blimey” exclaimed the Sargent, “That looks like solid gold. Eglos is Church in Cornish. Saint Euny Church Redruth if I’m not mistaken”.
Young Dennis simply stared with his mouth wide open.
Sergeant Harris knew he needed to act quickly. He was well aware of the incident on the train. It was then that he spotted the camera hanging around Dennis’ neck. “Did you take a photo of the train young Dennis?”.  “Oh yes” he replied, “Those T9s are my favourite locomotives and aren’t seen West of Wadebridge very often. Especially clean ons. I took a photo as the train approached then wound on quickly to get another shot as it passed by me”.
“Ok young man” said Harris, “ Let’s go as quick as we can down to see Alf at the Chemist before he close. With any luck he’ll develop the film for us. There’s just a chance that you managed to capture important evidence in your photos”.  With that they set off, both on their bicycles, along the road.
At the trackside, Lenny Trewithen was still searching for the gold that had slipped out of his pocket. The light he’d seen was now gone but that only worried him more. Had someone seen him? He had to find that package or his life wouldn’t be worth living. He was also worried that in wrestling the package from the man on the train, he’d done just a bit too much damage with the knife. Could he have killed the man he wondered? And maybe, in looking for the gold at the lineside he might also find the knife that he’d flung from the window. He wouldn’t want the police finding that.

Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 23, 2017, 03:31:53 pm
Episode Eighteen
So…..”You say that Johnny Pettifer helped you take the top off his drink with a Swiss type knfe” said Sergeant Tate as he interviewed Sylvia the barmaid in the buffet on the train. “Did you see him put the knife back in his pocket?”. “Yes” replied Sylvia “one of the other customers must have inadvertantly taken my bottle opener”.
“Hmmm” surmised Tate, “ I think we’d better go and have a word with you g Mr Pettifer”
Meanwhile, one of the other officers was having a word with a very worried looking Sophie Tremaine who sat with her arms clasped very firmly around her bag. “Would you mind if I had a look in your bag?” enquired the officer. “Oh there’s nothing in there” replied Sophie “nothing of interest to you”.
“Nevertheless, let’s have a look shall we”
 Meanwhile the photographs had been developed by Alf at the chemists and produced some excellent photographs.
Lenny Trewithen was becoming increasingly concerned. He could find no trace of either the package he’d lost or the knife which he had thrown from the train. He’d have to give up the search soon.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Mito on December 23, 2017, 09:10:15 pm
I'm going to have to have a drink. I can't stand the suspense..  :no:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: weave on December 23, 2017, 09:24:56 pm
Hi Martin (and Brian),

I'm going to have to have a drink too. Another great and very plausible excuse at this time of year (I've got loads for the last few hours, I say few hours....anyway).

Seriously it's getting really good.

Looking forward to more.

Cheers weave  :beers:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: cornish yorkie on December 23, 2017, 11:13:54 pm
 :hellosign: Many thanks Martin, looking forward to the next episode
      regards Derek.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: AlexanderJesse on December 24, 2017, 10:57:51 am
Well written story.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: themadhippy on December 24, 2017, 12:53:28 pm
my moneys  on the butler ,with the lead pipe ,in the billiard room
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 24, 2017, 02:19:51 pm
Episode Nineteen
Lenny decided to have one last look along the track. He figured that by now the police would be thinking about looking for lineside evidence. If he hung around too long they’d find him. Nothing, however, could be found. He simply had to leave the railway line. He decided to head back in to Port Perran from where he could catch a bus home.
Sergeant Harris rode back to the police station with young Dennis where they were able to have a close look at the eight photos from the roll of Kodak film. The first six were of steam locomotives around Port Perran including a fine picture of a very clean Castle on a special train. There were also some photos of panniers and praries going about their daily business, it was the final two photos which were of interest to Sergeant Harris. First, a really good shot of the T9 heading this afternoons train then a further shot of it passing by with a fine view of someone peering out of the carriage.
“That’s a super photo young Dennis. That may be really useful and I know it’s distant but I recognise that face leaning out of the window. If I’m not mistaken that’s the notorious Lenny Trewithen and he’ll be up to no good at all, no good at all”.
Sophie, back aboard the train, had no option but to open her bag. “Aha….” Said Sergeant Tate, “What ever do we have here then”?
“I’ve no idea how those two things got there”, protested Sophie, “ Someone must have planted them on me”.
“Of course they did”, replied Sergeant Tate, “And pigs might fly young Sophie. I think you have some explaining to do my lass”.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 27, 2017, 07:57:23 pm
Episode Twenty
I, I didn’t mean to take the wallets”, stammered Sophie “I just couldn’t resist.You can hand them back. I haven’t taken any money out.”
“Hand them over”, said Tate,”Let’s have a look. Who do they belong to?”. Opening the two wallets one at a time, Sergeant Tate was somewhat surprised. The first belonged to the mayor but the second one was more interesting. Leafing through he found a driving license revealing the name of one Johnny Pettifer.
“Very interesting, very interesting indeed” muttered Tate. “This wallet, where did you take it?”
“Oh that one was easy” replied Sophie with renewed confidence, “I went up to the buffet for my free drink and the chap in front of me was  so busy chatting up the barmaid that he forgot all about his wallet laying on the counter. He was busy helping the barmaid who had mislaid her bottle opener. He had his own opener attached to one of those Swiss Army type penknives. I just took my drink and couldn’t resist the wallet”.
“Well, nothing taken young lass. Be off with you”. Tate’s interest had been aroused such that he wasn’t interested in a spot of petty pilfering. He made his way back along the train.
Following a brief meeting with his fellow officers, Sergeant Tate decreed that the train must remain where it was but that all passengers with the exception of Johnny Pettifer would be allowed to catch another train to Truro.Tate ordered his officers to take guard  Tom Tonkiss and also Harry Thomas, who had discovered the body , to the station waiting room where he would interview them again later. “And don’t let anyone exit from the door near to where the body is” said Tate, “And don’t let anyone touch or move the body yet. Who knows what clues it might reveal”.
Johnny Pettifer was most indignant that he had nothing to do with the incident and proclaimed his innocence most indignantly but, when interviewed and searched, no trace could be found of the Swiss Army knife which had, of course, been identified as his by both Sophie Tremaine and Sylva Jakes, the barmaid in the buffet.
“Yes, I did have the penknife” stammered Pettifer, “but I don’t know where it’s gone. I swear, someone must have taken it from my pocket”
Meanwhile, Lenny Trewithen had given up searching for the package he’d dropped and the knife he’d thrown from the window of the train. Unfortunately for Lenny, as he clambered up the railway embankment he wandered straight into sight of Sergeant Harris. “Well, well, well fancy seeing you here young Lenny” said Harris, “I think you’d better come with me down to the police station”.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: dannyboy on December 27, 2017, 09:05:20 pm
And ..... and .....
I hope we do not have to wait until next year for the next instalment.  :)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 27, 2017, 09:10:50 pm
And ..... and .....
I hope we do not have to wait until next year for the next instalment.  :)
With any luck, and no over indulgence of our Christmas stock of bottles, instalment 21 will be tomorrow. Hopefully, all cleared up on Jan 4th!
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 28, 2017, 02:53:09 pm
Episode twenty One
With everyone now off the train the police were able to conduct a thorough investigation of the area around the body.
All passengers, apart from the few retained by the police were now on platform one awaiting a replacement train which eventually arrived behind a rather scruffy Ivatt 2-6-2 Tank. Nevertheless, some three hours late the train duly departed for Truro.
Sergeant Tate watched the train leave the station. He had some important questioning to carry out but nevertheless, he had an uneasy feeling that he had missed something. Could someone with some important information be sitting aboard that departing train.
Tate and his team examined the body. It was clear that he had died from a single stab wound to the heart. He had, however, been felled by a blow to the head. No doubt the attacker had used what looked like an old wooden axe handle that was lying nearby. Tate took a wallet from the dead man’s pocket which revealed him to be none other than well known Truro jeweller Eric Truthall, a well respected man in the area. There were, however, some folk who believed that beneath the honest, trustworthy exterior lurked a somewhat shady side.
The body was taken away and Tate turned his attention back to Johnny Pettifer.”so…if, as you say, you lost your knife, where could it have gone?” Enquired Tate.
“Your guess is as good as mine” replied Dodgy John, “I had it when I left the buffet but it’s gone now” 
“And did you see anything as you returned from the buffet to your seat?” Enquired Tate.
“Not a thing”, replied Pettifer but come to think of it I did see someone you may know sitting on the left just after the vestibule where you said the body was found”
“And who might that be.” Sneered Tate.
“Well, I don’t know his name but remember that theft of gold chalices from the church in St Ives five years ago. Bloke got four years for that ai think. Don’t know who he was but I recognised his picture from the newspaper. It was him sitting there, I’m sure of it”.
A shiver went through Sergeant Tate. Billy Brunt. Surely not. Why ever didn’t I spot him. He must be on that train to Truro now. “Evans” he shouted to a constable standing nearby “ Make sure that train is intercepted when it arrives at Truro. No one must leave until the local police are sure that Brunt isn’t among them”
Billy Brunt, thought Tate. If anyone was capable of killing a man it was him. If Pettifer is right then that good for nothing Brunt will have something to do with all of this.

Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: pesky badger on December 28, 2017, 03:54:14 pm
Wow, really intriguing.  Makes me want to book a murder mystery train event  :D
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: weave on December 28, 2017, 08:47:58 pm
Excellent stuff although you're not doing the Cornish Tourist Board any favours.

 Sounds bit dodgy down there.

Cheers weave  :beers:

Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 29, 2017, 06:13:10 pm
Episode Twenty Two
Now things were starting to swing into action. Divisional Commander Lance Wilson based at Truro police station had taken overall command having heard from both Sergeant Harris at Port Perran and Sergeant Tate who was in charge of the police team aboard the train.
Realising the seriousness of the situation he had called his superiors at the Exeter Headquarters of Devon and Cornwall Constabulary. It was agreed that DCI Tom Chandler would travel to Truro as a matter of urgency. Chandler had earned an enviable reputation over the last few years for solving serious crimes in the South West – especially crimes taking place on the railway. Chandler, being very meticulous and having an interest in railways to boot was an obvious choice to take charge. He would be assisted by his Sergeant, Alan Timms, a short, portly man. The two had worked together solving many mysteries.
The pair were to travel to Truro on the next train where they were to meet up with all involved in today’s events in order to be brought fully up to date.
Meanwhile, as the late running special train entered Truro station, a small band of uniformed police greeted Billy Brunt and escorted him to the police station.
Sergeant Harris was also making his way to Truro by car along with Lenny Trewithen who was sitting, hand cuffed,  next to a spotty faced young constable.
Sergeant Tate and his team had, after questioning, released Tom Tonkiss and Harry Thomas but both were ordered to remain in the area as they may be needed for further questioning later. Tate now headed towards Truro with Johnny Pettifer who would be held in custody pending further enquiries.
By 7-00 pm both Lenny Trewithen , Johnny Pettifer and Billy Brunt were all in separate cells. Tom Chandler, Alan Timms, DC Lance Wison and Sergeants Tate and Harris were gathering for a briefing due to start at 7-30.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 30, 2017, 02:03:31 pm
Episode Twenty Three
Tom Chandler wasted no time in getting down to work. He interviewed each of the local officers in turn and his Sergeant, Alan Timms, did exactly the same. Each officer was interviewed alone then they all returned to the main room where Tom Chandler gave a resume of what he had learned. After an open session where each man was able to air their own opinions the meeting was disbanded at 9.45pm, much to the irritation of the local men who were unused to working much beyond 5-00pm.
Chandler and Timms had booked accommodation at the Wig and Penn Inn where they enjoyed a superb meal over which they compared notes and formulated their plans.
Chandler was somewhat concerned that the local men had jumped to certain conclusions without hard facts to back them up. Indeed, it was a unanimous feeling that Billy Brunt was the villain despite very little evidence to support that view.
“We must look at all of the facts Alan” said Chandler. “We’ll sleep on it and formulate a plan of action in the morning over breakfast. Meanwhile what say you that we have a pint of Hicks Special Draught each as a nightcap ? That should help us to sleep well”
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on December 31, 2017, 03:06:23 pm
Episode Twenty Four

At breakfast the next morning, Chandler took the opportunity to outline the facts that they had gleaned. “This is what we know so far Alan” he said. “The train departed on time and without fuss. That may or may not be important to us. At some point the train stopped because someone pulled the communication cord. The guard thought he saw someone running from the train. The you g lad, Dennis Steele,captured a very good likeness to Lenny Trewithen leaning out of the carriage window. Young Dennis also found a wrapped package containing a gold ingot at the lineside. Sophie Tremaine stole two wallets which may or may not be significant. Johnny Pettifer ordered a drink from the buffet but opened it with his swiss knife which he then lost. A body, that of Eric Truthall a local jeweller was found in the vestibule on the train by Harry Thomas. He had been hit over the head and stabbed. The local police believe he died from the stab wound as there was a lot of blood. The train eventually continued towards Truro with a certain Billy Brunt still on  board. Billy Brunt is well known to the police and was arrested when the train arrived at Truro station. Is that a fair precis of the situation as you have understood it?” Chandler asked of Alan Timms.
“Pretty much” replied Timms but I think the local boys are missing something Sir. “So do I” replied Tom Chandler “ So do I. Straight after breakfast, I want you to go up to Trepol Bay and search the lineside. We must find the knife that may have been thrown from the train. I’m going to visit the hospital. The pathologist is carrying out the post mortem on Eric Truthall at 9-00. We need to know the results as soon as is possible. Take a couple of local bobbies with you up to Trepol Bay and hopefully you’ll find the knife. We’ll meet back at Truro police station at 12.30”
“Fir enough” replied Alan Timms as he took a last sip of his coffee.
By 10.15 Timms and the two constables were combing the trackside. It wasn’t long before Timms himself found what he was looking for. A small swiss style penknife smeared with blood. One of the local constables, who had searched in the other direction, however, stumbled upon another knife, with a smooth 5 inch blade , also smeared with blood.
Meanwhile at the hospital, Tom Chandler was about to hear the results of the post mortem.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 01, 2018, 02:37:41 pm
Episode Twenty Five
Tom Chandler was certain that the pathologist would provide valuable information and he wasn’t disappointed. The report revealed some very interesting facts indeed. Eric Truthall had received a minor stab wound to the chest area near the heart resulting in significant blood loss, this wound, although serious, would not have been fatal. There was also a more minor stab wound to his left hand possibly received during the course of a struggle. This hand wound had been missed by the police as the  left arm was laying under the body. There was also evidence of a significant, though not fatal , blow to the head. Almost certainly inflicted by a blunt object such as the wooden axe handle found nearby.
Chandler was eager to hear more. “So, you are probably wondering how Mr Truthall died” continued the pathologist. “Well, he died from strychnine poisoning. Probably inflicted whilst he was concussed by the blow to the head. There is evidence of a rag held over the mouth and traces of the poison within his mouth. I have no doubts that is the way in which he was killed”.
Chandler’s hunch was right. He had been convinced that there was more to the murder than had been surmised by the local police on the basis of the initial investigation. He was mow keen to meet up with his sergeant, Alan Timms.
“Excellent work Alan” lets’s get those two knives and the rag down to the lab. We need an analysis of the blood and anything else the tests might reveal”.
Meanwhile the two detectives from Exeter set about interviewing, for themselves, all those still held in custody, starting with Lenny Trewithen who was reluctant to say anything. Johnny Pettifer, likewise, had little to say, other than protesting his innocence.  Billy Brunt was more forthcoming, although he didn’t realise the importance of what he said.
“Right” said Chandler,”Let’s get up to that St Euny Church near Redruth. We need to speak to the vicar as a matter of some urgency”.
“Why is that? Enquired Timms , “Well”, replied Chandler, “That Brunt character made reference to the gold ingot that the young lad found by the lineside. He said we’d be better off having a word with the vicar of St Euny about some missing gold. How could Brunt have known about that?”
The two set off for Redruth by train from where they took a taxi to St Euny church where they found the vicar, preparing his next sermon, in the vicarage. The vicar, the Reverend Thomas Goldsworthy was a portly man with a bushy beard. Chandler came straight to the point “Has anything gone missing from you church in the last few weeks sir?” He asked. “Not to my knowledge” replied the vicar. “And do you know Eric Truthall, the jeweller from Truro?” Asked the inspector. “Oh yes” replied Goldsworthy, “He conducted a valuation of the gold and silver belonging to the church. It was necessary for insurance purposes you see”.
Chandler paused before continuing “I believe you were formerly the vicar of a church near St Ives”.
“Look, what exactly is this all about”   Asked the vicar becoming visibly worried, “Just routine enquiries” answered Chandler.
“Well yes, I moved here some six months ago”
“Thank you sir” said Chandler “You have been most helpful.
The two detectives left the vicarage. “ How on earth did you know that Goldsworthy had only just moved here?” Timms asked of Chandler. “Well, in the bar at the inn last evening, I was chatting to the barman whilst I was waiting for you to come down for supper. Just by chance he said he was a warden at Truro Cathedral and was well versed in local gossip. He volunteered the information I needed”
“But why is that important? “ asked Timms. “ If you recall, Alan, in our briefing with the locals last evening, Sargent Harris mentioned that Billy Brunt had been arrested  for stealing gold chalices from a church at St Ives. Now a gold ingot goes missing near Redruth. There is one common factor”.
“Is there?” remarked Alan Timms.
“Oh come on Alan” said Chandler. “It’s the same vicar at both churches”
“Of course” said Timms.
“Another word with our friend Brunt, I think” replied the Inspector as they set off again for Truro police station.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 02, 2018, 03:13:52 pm
Episode Twenty Six
On the way to Truro Chandler mused things over. “You know Alan, I think there’s a link between our friend Brunt and Lenny Trewithen. We need to prove that and we need to prove that our deceased friend  Eric Truthall is mixed up in the whole sorry tale somehow. Now whether Johnny Pettifer is involved, I’m not sure. And, of course, we have to consider Thomas Goldsworthy, the vicar. I’m certain he’s in on all of this”.
“So, what next Sir” enquired Alan Timms.
“Well, a thought has just struck me” replied Tom Chandler, “ Remember when we had our meeting with the local police. That Sergeant Tate said that Billy Brunt is a regular at the Old Crab and Alehouse in Truro. Hmmmm…..I think we’ll pop in there on our way to the police station and see what the landlord can tell us”
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 03, 2018, 08:28:22 pm
Episode Twenty Seven
The two detectives from Exeter decided to have lunch at the Old Crab and Ale House and were delighted to find the landlord, Charlie Trigg behind the bar. After a very agreeable lunch washed down with two halves of IPA the pair had a long discussion with the landlord. They were delighted with the outcome.
Billy Brunt was indeed a frequent visitor to the pub along with Lenny Trewithen and Eric Truthall. The Reverand Thomas Goldsworthy, not averse to a pint or two popped in from time to time. Johnny Pettifer played euchre for the pub team. On top of all this, Charlie  Trigg saw himself as a bit of an amateur sleuth. His daughter, Alice, who helped out in the pub liked nothing more than flirting with the customers, extracting information for her dad. Another local name that cropped up was that of Alec Rule, a local scrap metal dealer and a regular, every day, at the pub.
Tom Chandler was very keen to spend time chatting to Charlie Trigg. Chandler had a nose for information and his hunch was that he was about to discover all he needed to know about the murder on the train. He waited until closing time at 14.30 so that the bar was empty.  Handler sent Alan Timms off to a local valuation office in order to discover the true value of the gold ingot from St Euny Church. He was then to visit the daughter of the dead Eric Trithall. Chandler needed to know why Eric was on that train that day. The net was starting to close in.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 05, 2018, 01:26:20 pm
Episode Twenty Eight
Tom Chandler chatted to Charlie Trigg, the landlord, and his daughter for well over an hour and gathered much more information than he had expected. Before leaving, he rang the police station and asked for someone to bring in Sophie Tremaine for questioning. Chandler also said that he wanted a meeting with all police officers involved in the investigation at 7.30 that evening saying that he fully expected to reach a conclusion the following morning.
Chandler left the pub feeling that he now had virtually all the information that he needed.. he was very keen to find out how Alan Timms had got on visiting the valuation office and Eric Truthall’s daughter.
The two detectives from Exeter met up for coffee at 4.00. Timms had established that the gold ingot was valued at £550 and that Truthall’s daughter had no idea that he would be on the train. Indeed, she had thought that he had taken the bus that day to Redruth to value some gold.
Tom Chandler said to his colleague “Excellent work Alan, that is just the information I was hoping to hear”. He then proceeded to relay his findings to Alan Timms. “So….we now know what happened Sir” said “Timms”
“Yes Alan” replied Chandler “ I believe we do. I suggest we meet with the local police this evening to see if they have come up with anything we’ve missed. Not a word about what we know though. Not just yet. I want a word with Sophie Tremaine first”
The meeting with the local detectives didn’t throw up much information other than to substantiate a few details and tie up a few loose ends. They agreed to all meet the next morning at 11-00am.
Before retiring to the Wig and Pen for the evening however, Chandler and Timms questioned Sophie Tremaine.
“That went better than I expected” said Chandler to his colleague as they enjoyed their evening meal. “Tomorrow morning, after sleeping on it, I’ll go through my theory with you over breakfast. We can then reveal all at the police station at 11-00. We can then leave the locals to make the necessary arrests and we can get back to Exeter”
“Excellent Sir” smiled Alan Timms, “I’m looking forward to getting home”.
The two of them finished the evening with frothing pints of beer. “See you in the morning”,said Chandler as they headed up to their rooms.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 05, 2018, 06:06:33 pm
Episode Twenty Nine
At breakfast the next morning, the two Exeter detectives compared notes once again. “So Sir, what aroused your interest in the pub landlord?” Enquired Alan Timms.”It was his honest nature and genuine interest that grabbed my attention. He convinced me of his good intentions and his want to see justice done. I’d already agreed a reward of twenty pounds with the Divisional Manager for BR if anyone came up with information leading to a conviction. I was happy to trust Charlie Trigg enough to offer him the reward. Hopefully, he will share it with his daughter”, replied Tom Chandler. “We’ll set off now for the local police station where we are meeting the local force at 11.00. Let me do the talking Alan. We have enough information to allow the local lads to make several convictions”.
The pair set off for Truro police station. At 11-00, with some 15 local officers assembled in a semi circle in front of him, Tom Chandler began speaking – “Thank you for coming ladies and gentlemen. I believe that you will find what I have to say most interesting. Alan and I have made various investigations and believe that the following is a true statement of facts. Before I begin, I wish to thank the landlord of the Crab and Ale House, Charlie Trigg, and his daughter Alice. Both have been most helpful with our enquiries”.
A hush fell over the room as Tom Chandler continued………
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Ian Morton on January 06, 2018, 01:06:45 pm
Hands up who thought the detectives would be done in during the night...
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Gary Burcombe on January 06, 2018, 02:44:13 pm

(http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/gallery/60/3872-060118144331.png) (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view&id=60236)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on January 06, 2018, 02:56:38 pm
I'm ashamed to admit that I have suspicions about the vicar.  I've probably read too much of Dame Agatha over the years, where one must always beware of 'respectable' people.

I'm sure we will know soon and I'm looking forward to the loose ends being firmly knotted together.

Of course, knowing the ending will slightly spoil the TV adaptation next Christmas.  Still, the railway scenes (filmed on the Bodmin line?) will be terrific.  And the beer drinking will remind us of dear old Morse!

Yours in anticipation...

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 06, 2018, 03:39:26 pm
All should be revealed tomorrow.
I’ve rather run out of time today I’m afraid. Something to do with lovely weather (for a change) and a long countryside walk (with coffee and cakes) this morning.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 07, 2018, 06:46:32 pm
Episode Thirty
Tom Chandler continued “last evening, Sergeant Timms and I met with Sophie Tremaine. It appears that Thomas Goldsworthy, who purports to be the vicar at St Euny Church near Redruth is, in fact, Sophie’s father. There is no love lost between the two. Furthermore, and as I suspected, the Reverend Thomas Goldsworthy is a fraudster having completely deceived the Bishop of Truro. He has no qualifications as a priest and was only interested in getting his hands on the gold and silver at both the church at St Ives and then St Euny.  He moved from one to the other some six months ago”
“What led you to suspect Goldsworthy?” asked Sergeant Harris. “Oh that was easy” answered Chandler, “in conversation when I first questioned him, he had no real understanding of  book of Exodus, which I deliberately brought into the conversation. I would expect any Church of England vicar to be fully conversant with the bible. Goldsworthy certainly was not. Sophie Tremaine was most helpful in  our conversations. I realise that she is a petty thief but I’m more than willing to overlook that. She told me all about her upbringing, unhappy as it was. She also told me about the day she discovered that her father was not a real priest. I don’t need to go into details now but rest assured that it is all fully documented. Sophie was , in my opinion, aboard that train for honest reasons, although she did, as an opportunist thief, take the opportunity to steal two wallets. Which were, as it happens, later returned to their owners. Gentlemen, you can rest assured that Miss Tremaine was not involved directly in the murder of Eric Truthall”.
“Let us now delve into the background of Thomas Goldsworthy, particularly his time at the two churches at St Ives and then St Euny. He was well liked by his congregation but that is typical of  the man. He flatters to deceive. Sergeant Timms and I have spoken to many of his flock. All tell the same story of charm but distrust. We must be grateful to the tongue loosening properties of the excellent beer cellar at the Old Crab and Ale House in Truro for more information. Thomas Goldsworthy was far too eager to boast of  his deceptions once several pints had been consumed…….. “
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 08, 2018, 03:48:00 pm
Episode Thirty One
Chandler resumed after a short break for coffee “So….let’s move on to what actually happened on the fateful day. As we know all was well initially when the train departed from Truro amidst much celebration.  We know that Eric Truthall was on board with a ticket to Truro. Johnny Pettifer, Lenny Trewithen  and Billy Brunt also boarded at Truro. Sophie Tremaine joined the train at Trepol Bay.It was between Trepol Bay and Port Perran that the train came to a halt due to the communication cord being pulled. We also know that Lenny Trewithen jumped down from the train. We have photographs to that effect. Two knives were retrieved from the lineside just East of Perran Beach Halt, one of which was wrapped in a cloth. A gold ingot was also retrieved from the lineside”.
Tom Chandler took a sip of water before continuing “Sergeant Timms and I had a chat with the  bishop of Truro two days ago. Unbeknown to us, and yourself, he was having doubts about the credentials of Thomas Goldsworthy. So much so that one of the bishop’s assistants had been asked to delve into his past. Anyway, what none of us had realised was that Goldsworthy was also on the train. The Bishop is a railway enthusiast and had gone to Port Perran to photograph the special train. In the confusion the Bishop saw Goldsworthy, in casual civilian clothing sneak off the train and out of the station”. As the importance of this bit of information was realised throughout the room, there was a murmur of conversation. Chandler brought the room back to attention, “The landlord of the Olde Crab and Ale House, being a bit of an amateur sleuth, had rigged up a secret microphone in an upstairs room at the pub where Goldsworthy, Billy Brunt, a chap called Alec Rule who is a local scrap dealer  and Johnny Pettifer, plus a few others used to meet, allegedly to play cards. Alice,the landlord’s  daughter was used to flirting with the men up there and had been primed to ask pertinent questions. I won’t go into too much detail here but just to say the landlord was certain that Goldsworthy was up to no good and that he’d arranged to pass the gold ingot from St Euny Church to Eric Truthall who would sell it on at auction. Goldsworthy was to pass the gold over to Truthall on the train. Unfortunately, Johnny Pettifer, who was a bit of a loud mouth had passed this snippet of information on to Lenny Trewithen and Billy Brunt. We have all of this on tape which I’ll pass on this afternoon”.
There was silence  around the room but Sergeant Harris asked, “So….what happened on the train? Surely none of Truthall’s so called friends and acquaintances would go as far as to kill him?”
“I’ll continue” replied Chandler “Well, a couple of witnesses on the train saw Goldsworthy pass a medium sized package, which appeared to be quite heavy, to Eric Truthall soon after the train left Truro. Both men then went in different directions, Truthall walking towards the front of the train whilst Goldsworthy stayed in the same carriage near to the rear of the train.  You will recall that I mentioned the name of Alec Rule earlier who used to meet up with the others at the Crab and Ale House, well, he was very good friends with Lenny Trewithen. On hearing of the ingot, Rule had agreed to pay Trewithen 200 pounds for the ingot. This information was all overheard by Alice, the landlord’s daughter”.
Chandler carried on “Sergeant Timms and I have interviewed many of the passengers on the train over the last two days. This is what we believe happened……….”
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 08, 2018, 04:54:10 pm
Episode Thirty Two
“Eric Truthall made his way to the vestibule between the first and second carriages” reported Tom Chandler, referring quickly to his notebook, “he was followed, a minute or two later by Lenny Trewithen.  Johnny Pettifer was between the two but stopped to buy a beer at the buffet. He dropped his penknife shortly after leaving the buffet. This was picked up by Trewithen shortly  afterwards as noted by a lady sitting just beyond the buffet. This lady, a Mrs Hopkins, became suspicious when first Thomas Goldsworthy hurried past her followed very shortly by someone matching Billy Brunt’s description.  Some minutes later a young girl, who we believe to be Sophie Tremaine, also sauntered by. Mrs Hopkins suspicions were aroused because all three appeared to be in a hurry and looked worried or serious. Everyone else aboard the train was in high spirits”
Chandler carried on “having interviewed Trewithen, Pettifer, Goldsworthy, Brunt and Sophie Tremaine what happened next is the crux of the matter. Eric Truthall was waiting in the vestibule. Trewithen , having by chance picked up the knife followed him. He was carrying what appeared to be an axe handle, as witnessed by several other passengers. Trewithen was focussed on disabling Truthall to snatch the ingot. On reaching the vestibule, with no one else about, Trewithen hit Truthall over the head with the axe handle which he then dropped. In a scuffle Trewithen stabbed Truthall in the hand using Pettifer’s penknife. Truthall was disabled but not seriously injured but Pettifer grabbed the ingot, pulled the Communication Cord and jumped from the train as it stopped. He threw the knife away but in his hurry he dropped the ingot which he believed he could recover later. Thomas Goldsworthy, fearing that something may go wrong had taken the precaution of taking a knife aboard with him together with a cloth soaked in strychnine. He arrived just as Trewithen leapt from the carriage door.  Truthall believing that it was Goldsworthy who had attacked him turned on the so called vicar but was too slow. Goldsworthy stabbed him in the ribs then held the cloth to his mouth. Truthall slumped to the floor dead then Goldsworthy wrapped the knife in the cloth and threw it from the window. Goldsworthy was then horrified to find that the gold ingot had vanished. Goldsworthy then made his way to the rear of the train , regaining his composure before coming face to face with his daughter  Sophie. Sophie, knowing her father’s reputation quizzed and realised what had happened. She rushed back up through the train but by then Harry Thomas had come across the body and raised the alarm. So, gentlemen, a sorry tale but Goldsworthy is your killer. However, Eric Truthall and Lenny Trewithen had big parts to play. Johnny Pettifer, despite his reputation, was not involved although he may have been aware of what was likely to happen. Sophie Tremaine, although a petty thief, did try to reach Truthall to help him but he was long dead by then”
The local police assembled in the room were amazed by the prowess of the two detectives from Exeter. One eventually asked, “ So……what about Billy Brunt and Alec Rule the crap dealer? What part did they play?”
“I’m glad you asked that” replied Chandler “Rule was prepared to pay for the ingot but we have no proof that he can be linked to the case. He will simply deny involvement. As for Billy Brunt, well, he just happened to be aboard the train. Again, he knew the others but we have no evidence that can implicate him”.
After some discussion and questions Chandler addressed the group again , “Alan and I will return to Exeter this evening. We will leave it to you to press charges and to tie up the loose ends. On the whole,however, we-are pleased to have been able to help. Thank you gentlemen”

One episode to go later or tomorrow..
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 08, 2018, 07:40:50 pm
Episode Thirty Three
Two days later Tom Chandler and his able ssegeant Alan Timms are relaxing back at Divisional HQ in Exeter over a cup of coffee.
“I’m glad we were able to sort the murder mystery in Cornwall so effectively” said Timms. “So am I”, replied Chandler, “ So am I. It’s all about talking to the right people and I  mean the Bishop of Truro, the landlord of the Olde Crab and Ale House and Sophie Tremaine were all most helpful as was young Dennis Steele who witnessed the train stopping. I’ve arranged for the pub landlord and his daughter to receive a reward from BR. And BR are also giving a very special reward to young Dennis. He’s to receive a footplate trip aboard a T9 from Wadebridge to Truro. I bet he can hardly wait”
” So, I guess the local-lads back in Truro have tied up the loose ends? Enquired Timms. “I believe so” replied Chandler, “A nasty case all round. I expect a very severe sentence for Goldsworthy and a lesser, but still harsh, sentence for Lenny Trewithen. We shall  just have to wait and see”.
“And” continued Chandler, “I hear that after the first day the special Christmas trains to Truro were a great success and ran virtually full every day. The Truro Chamber of Commerce were also delighted by the  amount of extra trade generated by the trains. I also spoke  to the Bishop of Truro this morning. He is very embarrassed about the whole Thomas Goldsworthy incident  but passes on his thanks for bringing it to light”. So, very well done Alan. Here’s to our next case” he said raising his coffee cup.
THE END
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on January 08, 2018, 08:14:09 pm
An excellent Christmas story, Martin; thank you very much indeed.

The guilty vicar was fully in the Agatha Christie tradition.

I also enjoyed railway dimension and the fact that the detectives spoke to people.

And I appreciated that you described the detectives making full use of the brain-enhancing powers of foaming ale and coffee.

I'm at business tomorrow, so I will make use of the latter but, sadly, not the former - worst luck.  My brain needs all the help it can get!

Anyway; a super story.

Thank you.

Toodle-oo.

John 
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 08, 2018, 08:21:30 pm
Thank you John.
It was inspired by both Agatha Christie and the novels of Edward Marston (if you know him).
Marston’s railway detective seriies is very readable and set in the 1850s. Well worth a try if you haven’t come across his work.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Mito on January 08, 2018, 08:41:49 pm
I've enjoyed all the episodes immensely.  :thumbsup:  I don't know what I'm going to do in the evenings now! Have you thought of taking up a new career in you retirement? An Easter tale perhaps?
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 08, 2018, 08:49:13 pm
I've enjoyed all the episodes immensely.  :thumbsup:  I don't know what I'm going to do in the evenings now! Have you thought of taking up a new career in you retirement? An Easter tale perhaps?
No - it’s out of my system now. Back to model railways.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: AlexanderJesse on January 08, 2018, 09:25:20 pm
Many a thanks fot this pleasantly laid out story. Have you already started your collection of railroad stories?
Quote
So, very well done Alan. Here’s to our next case” he said raising his coffee cup.
Is this a promise? I certainly would be pleased...
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: dannyboy on January 08, 2018, 10:00:49 pm
the novels of Edward Marston (if you know him).
Marston’s railway detective seriies is very readable and set in the 1850s. Well worth a try if you haven’t come across his work.

Thank you for an excellent story Martin. Whilst reading the different chapters, I kept thinking of 'The Railway Detective' - I am currently reading the penultimate book, so, no more Chandler and Timms from port perran and not much more Colbeck and Leeming from Edward Marston. :'(.  As Mito alluded to, you have plenty of time to think of an Easter story ................  ???
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: TrevL on January 08, 2018, 10:14:10 pm
Thanks very much, really enjoyable.  I missed  the closing date for the poll unfortunately, I'd planned to put "other", but to be honest, I didn't have a clue.  Easter mystery would be good.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Ian Morton on January 08, 2018, 10:37:03 pm
Have you sold the film rights yet?
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: weave on January 08, 2018, 11:19:42 pm
Thank you Martin,

Really enjoyed that. I missed the 'whodunnit' poll too but then I'm rubbish at that and probably would have got it wrong anyway which is probably why I still like Columbo.

You're probably all quilled out before Easter but a Summer Mystery would be great. Maybe?

Thanks again,

Cheers weave  :beers:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Delboy on January 09, 2018, 05:25:48 pm
Hi Martin,
Thanks for an excellent tale. I started to read the first 2 chapters as you wrote them and then decided to wait until you had finished the story before reading the rest. It was excellent to read the whole story line from start to finish just now. Didn't see the vicar being the culprit. Well done.
Look forward to more mysteries from you in the future.
Cheers.
 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on January 09, 2018, 08:13:31 pm
Thank you John.
It was inspired by both Agatha Christie and the novels of Edward Marston (if you know him).
Marston’s railway detective seriies is very readable and set in the 1850s. Well worth a try if you haven’t come across his work.

Many thanks, Martin.

I have not heard of Mr Marston (until now).  I'll make a point of finding his books.

I do like Agatha Christie and Margery Allingham, though.  And, more up to date, Colin Dexter.

All the best.

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: MalcolmInN on January 12, 2018, 11:25:52 pm
Marston’s railway detective seriies is very readable and set in the 1850s. Well worth a try if you haven’t come across his work.
Thanks, no I had not, but per your suggestion - this morning postmanpat delivered me my first two :) and am now 1/2 way thro' "The Railway Viaduct" :)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: cornish yorkie on January 13, 2018, 01:09:02 am
 :hellosign: Many thanks Martin, a very enjoyable story
      regards Derek.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: themadhippy on January 13, 2018, 02:14:00 am
Quote
I kept thinking of 'The Railway Detective' - I am currently reading the penultimate book,
Once youve finished the series the home front detective series  is worth a look.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: dannyboy on January 13, 2018, 03:44:23 pm
@MalcolmAL (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=3699)  I started with 'The Railway Viaduct' and was hooked. I then scoured around to read the series from book 1 - they all follow on chronologically, following the detectives through life. Amazon is a good source to look, most of the series I bought for £2/£2.50p each.

@themadhippy (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=4863) I have to agree. I only have the last 'Railway Detective' to find but have read 'Five Canaries', one of the 'Home Front' series. I hunted around and found books 1 and 2, so I am reading that series from the beginning.

Am now awaiting Book 2 in the 'Cornish Mystery' series. (Hint hint) @port perran (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230)
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: MalcolmInN on January 13, 2018, 03:53:23 pm
they all follow on chronologically, following the detectives through life.
Good point, you must be telepathic, I was about to ask about that :) I'll go do some googling to find the list.

Like when we had to dive back in time from half way through Patrick O'Brian / Capt. Aubrey when Patrick realised he had started too late in the Captain's life and had to write some prequels !
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: MalcolmInN on January 14, 2018, 12:49:55 am
  I started with 'The Railway Viaduct'
follow on chronologically,
I found the bibliography and turns out that we are not too temporally disoriented, the other one that I bought 'on the spur' was #2"The Excursion Train" which swmbo is reading at the mo..

My verdict on Viaduct - a bit disjointed and episodic to begin (1/3) [with overtones of Deus ex Machina /controlling mind dictating what he says next] but eventually got into its stride and was well enjoyed.

However I expected,
 ,
spoiler alert - tear here and digest anyone not yet reading --
,
,
Luke Rogan to be shot much earlier than Sir Thingumy Whatsit got a rountuit,
a little hastily ended perhaps ?

If Sir Whatsit was that well connected (and harking back to) the Bonaparte era I expect he could have called upon friends of Blucher to spirit him away into The EU and then would follow a right good romp and merry dance   :) !

Sorry @port perran (http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?action=profile;u=230)   I am confounding your topic, praps we should sart a Railway Detective topic somewhere ?
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on January 14, 2018, 08:53:41 am
Like when we had to dive back in time from half way through Patrick O'Brian / Capt. Aubrey when Patrick realised he had started too late in the Captain's life and had to write some prequels !

I really enjoy the Aubrey/Maturin novels and have rationed myself to one every couple of years to make them last...

Sadly, I did not do this with Jane Austen and just keep re-reading them.

Best wishes.

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 14, 2018, 11:48:36 am
I’m just about to finish the latest one entitled A Christmas Railway Mystery (marston must have stolen the name from me) which is excellent.
I’ve read them all now, they do pop up in 2nd hand bookshops/charity shops quite often.
As Mad Hippy states the Home Front series is also good.
As for another story from me.......well.......maybe - perhaps a Summer one.
We’ll see.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on January 14, 2018, 03:05:31 pm
As for another story from me.......well.......maybe - perhaps a Summer one.
We’ll see.

That will, hopefully, be something to look forward to.

All the very best.

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: MalcolmInN on January 16, 2018, 01:05:16 am
to make them last...
I would advise (!ahem) buy them all as soon as your piggy bank allows and get them read, enjoy,  put into your library, re-read from decade to decade because,
who knows , , ,
slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
 :worried:
I’m just about to finish the latest one entitled A Christmas Railway Mystery
two down so far for me
Does poor ol' Lemming get beat up in every one ! ?  if so he must be in a bit of a state by Christmas  :'(

two more on order :)




Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: Train Waiting on January 16, 2018, 09:12:21 am
to make them last...
I would advise (!ahem) buy them all as soon as your piggy bank allows and get them read, enjoy,  put into your library, re-read from decade to decade because,
who knows , , ,
slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
 :worried:

Thank you Malcolm; I take your point.

Prematurely joining Rosencrantz and Guildenstern without having the pleasure of reading them all.

Will rethink my plan.

All the very best.

John
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: port perran on January 16, 2018, 09:17:18 am
to make them last...
I would advise (!ahem) buy them all as soon as your piggy bank allows and get them read, enjoy,  put into your library, re-read from decade to decade because,
who knows , , ,
slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
 :worried:
I’m just about to finish the latest one entitled A Christmas Railway Mystery
two down so far for me
Does poor ol' Lemming get beat up in every one ! ?  if so he must be in a bit of a state by Christmas  :'(

two more on order :)
No, he doesn’t always get beaten up. You don’t have to read the books in order, they do I tnink stand alone ok. Well worth reading.
Title: Re: A Cornish Christmas Mystery
Post by: dannyboy on January 16, 2018, 09:40:42 pm

 You don’t have to read the books in order, they do I tnink stand alone ok. Well worth reading.

I agree that each book is a good read in its own right, but who wants to read about Colbeck and Madeline in books 8 or 9 without discovering how they first met and ........... (I won't spoil things  :no:). Same with the 'Home Front Detective' series, much better I think to follow the characters through life and see how their relationships develop, (but that is another topic!).  :)