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Author Topic: Wrenton  (Read 12537 times)

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Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #60 on: September 10, 2017, 12:31:00 pm »
Your work is fantastic. I hope you're pleased with it, I would be!
I have to say it's great to see the good comments my work is getting. But whatever our ability we can always try to improve our models. That's one of the things that makes this hobby so rewarding.

Offline Innovationgame

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #61 on: September 10, 2017, 01:09:56 pm »
Your modeling is a real inspiration, Roger. At the moment I'm into quick and dirty because I have set myself the target of getting the whole layout to a reasonably complete running state as quickly as possible. But, when I get round to revisiting the modeling, I shall be really indebted to your posts. So THANK YOU!
With kind regards
Laurence

Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #62 on: September 10, 2017, 01:30:35 pm »
Your modeling is a real inspiration, Roger.

Thanks Laurence, kind of you.

So, onto the next chapter....

PLANTING SOME BUILDINGS (July – August 2015)

The scenic section of the baseboard is 2’6” deep – not much chance of detailing areas to the rear of the layout leaning across that width. Would it be possible to build the scenery as a free-standing unit which could be fixed onto the baseboard only when it was nearly complete? The answer seems to be yes!

Here is a diagram showing an approximation of the proposed layout of the buildings on the right hand side of the layout. The baseboard joint runs through Nos.2 and 3 The Causeway and that building will have to straddle the joint and be removable. This arrangement closely follows that of the real village (the only sizeable part of the layout that does) except that the building I’m calling the vicarage is actually a couple of buildings further away from the guildhall. The house is large enough for the vicar of Wrenton to have plenty of space for his model railway!



The area to be built includes a hill along which several of the buildings, already made, had to be sited. The gradient of the hill was therefore dictated by that implied by the buildings. I needed a way of constucting a slope which was already precisely defined.

I decided to build up the structure layer by layer, using 5mm thick foamboard. I started by cutting a piece of paper the size of the area to be constructed - the full length of this section of baseboard, 3’2”, and about 2’ wide. I positioned the buildings on the paper and drew lines around them. I then measured the change in ground level each building required and was thus able to work out the changes all the way up the hill. I then worked out where each layer of foamboard had to be cut, extending lines out from the road into the adjoining areas to form a countour map. The church was to be included in this group of buildings, so a fairly flat area was needed for that and I also had to work out the shaping of the slope which drops down to track level.

I then cut foamboard to the required shapes and glued the layers together. To eliminate any risk of the structure flexing I cut slots in the third and fourth layers from the bottom into which I inserted a couple of 10mm diameter steel rods. All the buildings have 'foundations' so cutouts were made for them to 'plug' into. The exact placing of the church I left till later. It would only need a shallow cutout.

I put the buildings temporarily in place, together with some trees to give an idea of how the whole scene will be arranged. Some levels were lowered a layer after seeing this trial assembly and in places were refined by adding small pieces of card (mounting board).



When I was happy with the levels I gave the surface a coat of diluted PVA to seal it and then coated the whole thing with plaster. Then came a layer of plaster bandage, though not in the road area where I preferred to keep the surface smooth. When that had dried it was time to spray paint the whole thing. First, though, Inspector Tilly popped in from next door to check the work. You can see the cutouts in this shot.



After several attempts to tempt Tilly to move out of the danger zone I sprayed the base with Humbrol acrylic dark brown and the road with grey. The small projecting area at the right is where a tunnel mouth will fit.



The buildings, except for the church, were installed next. A few trees were added for this photo which finally allows me to see if I'd got the scene I was hoping to create.



Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #63 on: September 10, 2017, 09:58:22 pm »
GARDENING TIME (August - September 2015)

The builders moved in and put up a wall between the two cottages at the front of the scene. And, overnight, nature took over.



There are tiny pieces of Woodland Scenics clump foliage in the small garden area and in front of the cottage on the left.

To form the plants growing over the garden wall and onto the cottage walls I used a bit of the material used for stuffing toys which I’d already used when making the trees. A small piece was torn off and teased out and then given a spray of green. When dry, a touch of hair spray and then a quick dip in WS Blended Turf resulted in a nice open textured look. I glued the result to the garden wall and up onto the buildings.

I moved on to the back gardens, starting with a small one which is pretty much hidden from sight, at least from the front of the layout. I started by making some flowering static grass clumps, using a technique I found on YouTube.

Briefly, greaseproof paper was laid in the lid of a tin. Spots of WS Scenic Glue were added, in neat rows, onto which static grass was applied, the earthing clip of the applicator being fixed to the tin lid. When the glue had dried the paper was cut into strips, more glue applied carefully to the tips of the grass and then the strip was inverted and dipped into the ‘flowers’. This is my first try:



Next I wanted some crazy paving. I tried photographing my own back garden path but the printed result was disappointing. So I used the photos as a basis and did lots of Photoshopping to produce this:



Edging the garden with Kestrel laser cut fencing, adding a lawn of static grass and building the beds with my flower clumps and bits of foliage produced a reasonable little garden.



The crazy paving puts in another appearance in one of this next group of gardens. The other paths are simply painted onto the plaster base. A couple more Kestrel fences were used,  the others are scratch built, as are the sheds, compost bins and rabbit hutch. The large greenhouse is from Peedie models, the smaller one is another Kestrel item.



These gardens are at the back of the layout but the next one is in a prominent position facing the front. The tricky bit here was the pergola down the centre of the garden. It was constructed in situ using 20 thou square Slater’s microstrip. I drilled holes in the base into which the posts were glued. Then the horizontals were added and finally the angled cross pieces, all fixed with Mek Pak. I found it was easier to use a long piece of microstrip and cut it to length when the cement had set. Trying to hold in place pieces pre-cut to length proved too fiddly. The completed and painted structure was covered with the same toy stuffing and WS Turf. Some Woodland Scenics flowers scatter was sprinkled on. The shed was the very first thing I made in N scale.



To make the small decorative conifers I cut a length of paper narrowing to one end. This was glued and wrapped round a suitable length of wire. When the glue had set I painted the paper dark green. Scenic Glue was later brushed on and the tree was rolled in some scatter material spread out on a piece of paper. A couple of hours later any loose scatter was tapped off and a dusting of hair spray applied to make sure that the rest stays in place.



Offline Trev

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #64 on: September 10, 2017, 09:59:27 pm »
Having whetted our appitite with the photos, when and where can we see your wonderful creation in real life?  Look out Pendon and the Vale scene, you have serious competion  :D
« Last Edit: September 10, 2017, 10:00:49 pm by Trev »
Whenever I write a letter to someone, I add a footnote briefly explaining Ohm's law. It's my P.S. de resistance.

Online Tank

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #65 on: September 10, 2017, 10:05:10 pm »
The gardens are fantastic, well done. :thumbsup:

Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #66 on: September 10, 2017, 10:20:57 pm »
THE CHURCH YARD (November 2015)

Having built some gardens I turned my attention to the area around the church.



Most of the grave stones were home made, using the Silhouette cutter but a few are 3D printed items from Peedie models.



The boundary wall is plastikard, the pillars being pieces of Plastruct, both covered with home printed brick paper. The railings are another Peedie models product.



This is how the completed church area looks from the back of the layout. A lot of work here which isn’t usually seen!



To the right of the church I planted some trees. These, combined with a curve in the road, serve to hide the latter as it hits the back scene. The rear-most trees are clumps of foliage glued onto the backscene.



The four-bar fencing was cut from 20 thou Plasticard using the Silhouette cutter.



The posts were thickened by sticking on strips of 20 x 40 thou.

Finally, here’s a view of the right hand scenic module temporarily in place and showing how it relates to the railway. It will eventually be glued to the baseboard and more scenic treatment will blend it in.

To paint the centre line markings on the road I put strips of masking tape down the middle of the road. I then measured and marked the centre, removed the tape and cut it in half, following the markings. I then put the tape back in place, leaving a small gap between the two halves thus producing a stencil. The lines were then painted using white mixed with a bit of black to dull it down slightly.


Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #67 on: September 10, 2017, 10:26:07 pm »
Having whetted our appitite with the photos, when and where can we see your wonderful creation in real life?  Look out Pendon and the Vale scene, you have serious competion  :D
I think I'm a bit past the age when I want to transport the layout to shows! But it's nice to share it in photographs. Oh, and I think Pendon have nothing to fear! But thanks for the compliment.

Offline Rowlie

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #68 on: September 10, 2017, 11:31:52 pm »
Superb modelling, looking forward to next instalment.  Thanks for doing the tutorial on your house building technique.

Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #69 on: September 10, 2017, 11:34:57 pm »
I started 2016 making some more buildings for the left hand end of the layout.







A larger group will be forming one side of the approach road to the station. There was still some work to do on it when I took the photos, including painting the chimney pots and adding some clutter in the yard. The group is designed to be on a slope, climbing away from the station. The white building houses the village post office and a gift shop.  The brick one’s use hadn’t been decided at photo time, but it’s now a florist’s. I built the group on a piece of ply wood.







Most of the prototype buildings on which I’ve based my models are within a few hundred yards of one another. The fronts of the next houses are based on buildings in a nearby hamlet. They will also be on the road climbing away from the station, so once again were made with lots of ‘foundations’ to be buried in the scenic base.



Next up comes a pair of semi-detached cottages, also based on buildings a little way out of the village. A distant relation used to live in the right hand one and my parents often stayed there in the 1930s and 40s.



Finally, a pair of cottages based on a GER design contemporary with the station buildings. These, too, will go on the station approach road.



By May 2016 I had all the main buildings needed for the left end of the layout so here goes with the scenic base to put them on. As with the other end of the layout it's made of layers of foam board and card to give the necessary gradients. You can see the cut-outs where the buildings will be inserted. Three buildings will sit across the join between two baseboards and will remain removable. The missing rectangular area at the front right is where the station buildings go and the 'hanging' section at the far left goes over a tunnel portal.



After plastering (including a layer of plaster cloth), a quick spray of brown and grey paint and fixing the pavements down I tried the module in place on the layout, adding the buildings, though not yet fixing them. A road bridge and tunnel portal are also temporarily in place.




Offline Chris in Prague

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #70 on: September 11, 2017, 06:24:44 am »
More superb work and great tips. I was trying to find some small poplars to buy. Now I will make my own but will, probably, use cocktail sticks rather than wire for the core. The crazing paving and flower making tips will save a lot of money, too.

Offline daveg

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #71 on: September 11, 2017, 07:00:58 am »
Totally superb!

The brief tutorials are great.

Many thanks.

Dave G

Offline Delboy

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #72 on: September 11, 2017, 11:45:26 am »
Hi Roger,
I wish I had a tiny fraction of your talent and patience to produce such stunning scenery.
Looks absolutely fabulous. can't wait to see more.
Dennis.
 :)
She who must be obeyed says I am spending too much time on this forum. I love her dearly but what does she know?

Offline weave

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #73 on: September 11, 2017, 12:10:38 pm »
Hi,

Hadn't seen this weekend's pics. Have to go work now but after a quick scroll down, absolutely fantastic! Looking forward to reading it properly later.

Cheers weave  :beers:


Offline rogerdB

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Re: Wrenton
« Reply #74 on: September 11, 2017, 03:01:55 pm »
MORE GARDENING (July – August 2016)

Some of the buildings are now fixed in place, their gardens planted and the area between the gardens and the station car park has been developed.



As these gardens face the front of the layout I added a fair amount of detail. The house on the left is home to a couple with small children who are playing in a sand pit while mum watches. Next door lives a keen gardener so he has a greenhouse and keeps his small patch looking neat and tidy.



The next garden is just path and grass with a substantial brick built shed. Then comes another nice garden with a small vegetable patch.  The lady of the house can just be seen telling her husband that she’s off shopping. And in the back yard of the shops the owner of the Corner Cupboard is accepting a delivery of some parcels. There’s usually a tree in the corner of the yard but I took it out for this shot.



Here are some views from the back of the layout, no longer possible now that the scenic module is in place on the layout. The white house below seems to have bought some second hand GWR spear fencing.



In the next two photos the hedge in front of the right hand building was made by shaping some balsa wood, painting it dark green and then adding some WS fine turf.




« Last Edit: September 11, 2017, 03:03:29 pm by rogerdB »

 

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