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Author Topic: Point Motors  (Read 1177 times)

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Offline BlythPower

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #30 on: April 16, 2018, 02:42:49 pm »
Yes that is the Gaugemaster point motor that I tried as I said it does look very much like a Peco but with the added benifit of screw terminals and a built in mounting plate or direct fitting to points I personaly think they are very good value and a better quality as well .
Bob Tidbury

Having used both Peco and GM, I can say that the Peco ones fitted directly to Peco points without any trouble but the GM motors (three examples) needed their prongs tweaked a little to fit. The screw terminals on the GM ones are a good idea and they also come with the extension pin and more than enough mounting screws.

Offline DaveGlew

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #31 on: April 19, 2018, 03:24:16 pm »
Has anyone had experience of Peco PL11s - was considering them for the fiddle yard?
If it looks right, it probably is right.

Offline Zwilnik

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #32 on: April 19, 2018, 03:27:30 pm »
Has anyone had experience of Peco PL11s - was considering them for the fiddle yard?

I've used them previously without too many problems. Pretty straightforwards but always worth having a CDU (Capacitor Discharge Unit) to beef up the pulse of power to them if you have a few.

Offline DaveGlew

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #33 on: April 19, 2018, 03:41:30 pm »
Has anyone had experience of Peco PL11s - was considering them for the fiddle yard?

I've used them previously without too many problems. Pretty straightforwards but always worth having a CDU (Capacitor Discharge Unit) to beef up the pulse of power to them if you have a few.
Thanks, sounds encouraging. I always prefer to use a CDU and a "pencil"
If it looks right, it probably is right.

Offline crepello

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #34 on: April 21, 2018, 04:37:47 pm »

I tried Seeps on a layout back in the 80s, I found the required throw in N wasn't enough to change the built-in polarity switch reliably, so I ended up having to add micro-switches.

I space the Seeps away from the baseboard so that the overall distance from point motor to point operating bar is about an inch. Seep goes full throw no problem, also Seep positioning is much less critical.
 :beers:
Yes lack of full throw is a big problem with Seeps. I've resorted to an extra motor in a few locations purely to switch the polarity. How did you link the operating rod to the tie bar Bob?

Online austinbob

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #35 on: April 21, 2018, 05:23:20 pm »

I tried Seeps on a layout back in the 80s, I found the required throw in N wasn't enough to change the built-in polarity switch reliably, so I ended up having to add micro-switches.

I space the Seeps away from the baseboard so that the overall distance from point motor to point operating bar is about an inch. Seep goes full throw no problem, also Seep positioning is much less critical.
 :beers:
Yes lack of full throw is a big problem with Seeps. I've resorted to an extra motor in a few locations purely to switch the polarity. How did you link the operating rod to the tie bar Bob?

Seep linked in the usual way with the Seep rod through the tie bar hole. Because the distance from the Seep pcb to the tie bar is about an inch, there is enough flex in the Seep rod to allow the point motor to go full throw.
Initially I used PM4 motors with a latching spring to help keep the Seep locked in position. Found the springs to cause stiff operation in some instances so they wouldn't work reliably. Cut the springs out and they work fine without them. So effectively converted them to PM2's
 :beers:
Size matters - especially if you don't have a lot of space - and N gauge is the answer!

Bob Austin

Offline Caz

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #36 on: April 21, 2018, 07:11:37 pm »
If you space off the Seep by a minimum of 20mm from the underside of the point then the throw works every time, have 70 odd on Claywell and they all throw the inbuilt switch to change the frog polarity.   ;)

Online austinbob

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Re: Point Motors
« Reply #37 on: April 21, 2018, 08:18:52 pm »
If you space off the Seep by a minimum of 20mm from the underside of the point then the throw works every time, have 70 odd on Claywell and they all throw the inbuilt switch to change the frog polarity.   ;)
That's right Caz, works every time. :)
Size matters - especially if you don't have a lot of space - and N gauge is the answer!

Bob Austin

 

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