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Author Topic: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama  (Read 4439 times)

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Offline Ditape

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2016, 01:53:15 pm »
If it's of interest I'll walk through the build?

Yes please!  :D :thumbsup:
That's a Yes from me. :thumbsup:
Diane Tape



Online maridunian

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2016, 03:50:40 pm »
If it's of interest I'll walk through the build?

Marty

Yes, please!

Mike

Offline Dorsetmike

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2016, 08:44:57 pm »
In for a treat, I've seen some of it on another forum.
Cheers MIKE
(Sorry, but you are not allowed to access the gallery)


How many roads must a man walk down ... ... ... ... ... before he knows he's lost!

Offline Marty

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2016, 10:55:54 am »
Ok... so... some time has passed since the original post and if you are coming fresh to this story I will refer you to the first post for a bit of back ground and to save me having to type it out again here.


As mentioned previously the diorama was a test bed for some techniques that I had read about in various publications and online.

The following photo shows how the bits of timber from the previous post were put together. Why on earth would you do it that way? Well, during the planning stage for my main layout I had come to the decision that the baseboard would be open frame after the american practice, using L-girders, joists and risers. This method of constructing a base board lends itself to terrain surrounding the railway that can go both up and DOWN and I was keen to build a railway in a landscape that represented the prototype West Wales.


The long flat timbers represented the top part of a couple of L-Girders then the cross framing joists and finally the vertical risers...





but where does the track go


Rather than a bit of ply or some other flat board that has had the road bed cut out like a cookie cutter, an alternative is to create a strong and sinuous roadbed from laminated strips of 3mm mdf.

There were places on the layout like stations and yards where flat boards would be used but the plan was to connect the boards with these spline roadbeds.


By putting a nail on the centre line of the rail formation line on top of the riser, the first strip of mdf can be bent according to the required radius and pegged to one side of the nail.






Then the second strip of mdf is prepared with a fine layer of well spread out PVA...






and glued to the first and pegged until dry, then the next and the next, all on the same side of the nail, about 5 in all I think.







Then you pull the nail out, the glue squeezed out from between the MDF strips has formed a strong bond with the top of the riser and you start gluing out the strips on the other side of the centreline. You can see the gentle curve in the photo below.





I do like this method, it sets up rock solid and is great for setting up transition curves between the straights and the bend radius.


cheers

Marty
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 12:48:59 pm by Marty »

Offline Marty

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #19 on: September 15, 2016, 11:46:36 am »
thank you for the Thumbs up peeps and Ian Morton, nice to see you there again!


Onwards then... the good thing about this little diorama was that it was immensely enjoyable to put together and pretty much all over in 6 months. My main layout is in it's 10th year of construction and moves ahead with glacial speed.


Below is a photo showing the spline road bed in place, 10 splines wide and solid as a rock. Around the perimeter of the diorama are some carboard mockups of the edges of the board. There were some issues in compressing the prototype into the area to be used for the diorama, not only in width and length but also in height. More on that in a minute.





After confirming that my skills were up to this type of base board construction the method was used some time later on the main layout. It proved it's worth too, in the photo below the red circles indicate the locations where the glue join between riser and spline road bed, and in some cases at the back ply road bed, had to be broken to allow for the adjustment of the gradient which had been too steep.

In the foreground and to the right are some examples of the sweeping curves possible with this method.





When designing the diorama a series of sketches and plans were created to help guide the direction of the build.

The pencil sketch in the original post was one of them and a plan of what was existing at one point in time on the ground another one. This was created from information found on various maps and period photographs.





The Mill and the weir on the other side of the bridge were crying out to be modelled but in the end there just wasn't the room and a condensed version with some of the major features retained was adopted and sketched out.





There was enough detail to excite me with a wooden platform, pagoda style hut, one wall of a stone bridge, an occupation bridge, some fields, an embankment and a river. But not too much to overwhelm.

If I was to do another one or, as i continually do to new modellers, suggest undertaking one of these small micro layouts/dioramas as a starter, my only addition would be to include one point and a signal. This would allow the new modeller to experiment with their point acuation method of choice and likewise with the signal.

Next... building up the land form.

Always happy to answer sensible questions if there are any.

cheers

Marty
« Last Edit: September 15, 2016, 11:54:16 am by Marty »

Offline Ian Morton

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #20 on: September 15, 2016, 04:15:37 pm »
thank you for the Thumbs up peeps and Ian Morton, nice to see you there again!
Always a pleaseure to look at your work Marty.  :thumbsup:

Offline Marty

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2016, 01:35:56 pm »
Thank you Ian, I must dig up some of your more recent posts and see what you are up to.

... and once again, thanks for the thanks folks... on we go.


After many years of armchair modelling and research it seemed to me that cheapest and most "moldable" method of creating the hills and valleys around my railway was by gluing, sawing, scraping and cutting expanded polystyrene. At a later stage once the wanted shapes had been carved a thin layer of colour tinted polyfiller soaked into the open weave "Jays" (or Chux if you're in Australia) cloths would be interwoven to create a hardshell. In some future post there will be photos of this delightful process. One of my favourite bits of modelling... but I digress.

Accordingly, as time went by, I squirrelled away in the attic all manner of polystrene discards from white goods purchases to scavenged bits from friends, families and neighbours.

At some stage I'm going to have to work out how to dispose of the unwanted bits still in my attic!

Lesson one, you really just want the flat bits, any thickness will do. Not the curved and purpose formed bits that are used around the new televison set or vacuum cleaner. Unless you like jigsaws that is....

and Lesson two, It is a delight to carve up and work with... but a nightmare to clean up afterwards. The static that comes from carving it up makes it stick to everything. The bread knife (after I bought SWMBO a new one), the layout, the track, the workbench, me, and worst of all... the dog. The dog was bad because, unlike me who was careful to remain in the confines of the layout room, he was prone to wandering around the house checking out what the other humans were up to.... complete with his coating of polystyrene balls....oh brother.





I've now been banned from using polystrene for landforms by the domestic authorities and the dog, bless his dear departed heart, had tried hard to take on board that ploystyrene coated wanderings are not a way to win friends and influence his humans.





But this was all to come on the main layout. Experimenting with the concept was the name of the game on the diorama and with small pieces of polystrene the resultant mess was... well... small.


This little box with it's mock up cardboard facia boards was all that needed building up... but the last wall was required first and this was the single wall representation of the Alltycefan bridge over the Afon Teifi.

It is a fascinating bridge. Originally built by the local landholder/lord of the manor to "improve the economic opportunities of the parish" it was built in the early 1800s. Then when the railway came along in 1897 the section of the bridge on the bank blocking the path of the railway was demolished and then rebuilt with a railway arch in it. I know this because I've been there and seen the different styles used in it's construction. The stonemason responsible for the stonework in the bridges along the permanent way had a distinctive style.
 
Once again a cardboard mock up was drawn up from photos and maps. It was here that the differences in vertical scale versus horizontal scale became apparent. The arch was way narrower than the prototype and the main arch was much higher. In the end, with little choice due to the space available, it was accepted as a "representation" that would just have to do.







Then came the polystyrene, layered up from base with PVA being used to bond it together (I since found a hot glue gun was better).





Things were starting to take shape and this last photo for tonight gave a hint of the photographic potential of the diorama to come.





It kept me motivated anyway.


cheers
Marty
« Last Edit: September 16, 2016, 02:08:40 pm by Marty »

Offline signalman1

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2016, 02:04:45 pm »
This is one to follow  :thumbsup:, I have a few bits and pieces left over from my layout and I've been thinking about doing something like this but an industrial scene.

Offline Marty

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2016, 04:10:01 pm »
Thank you signalman, I'll do my best to keep the story rolling along.

Just a short one tonight as its getting late after a family dinner and get together.

The landform had been built up to the height of the field between the railway and the river and the embankment built up above that.

More cardboard mock ups were made of the rail bridge over the Afon Teifi and the occupation bridge jammed in between the bridge and the embankment.

In reality there is 100 yards or more between these different elements of the scene but there just wasn't the room. The occupation bridge arch design was purely a stab at getting something in place that looked right. Several years later on a very kind modeller who lives not too far away took a couple photos that clearly showed me what it SHOULD look like. It was built in the flat girder style on my layout. Mind you... I think I like the arch one better.

A temporary photo as a back scene and some rolling stock and track and the whole thing came alive. It was full steam ahead from there on in.






A power pole, some trees and the local passenger service.






The river was next to be carved out and a mockup of the halt and pagoda hut were made. I could already hear the chuckle of the water over the shallows and the sheep in the fields beyond the embankment.

Cheers

Marty
« Last Edit: September 17, 2016, 04:14:27 pm by Marty »

Offline signalman1

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2016, 04:26:11 pm »
Excellent, never thought of using polystyrene I would have gone down the chicken wire mesh route but like the idea of using the poly (will have to wait till wifey is out whilst cutting though ,she hates mess !!!!!!!! ;D

Offline Marty

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2016, 01:31:18 pm »
Lots of different options Signalman.

Rather than the polystyrene there are a lot of modellers using the closed cell polyethylene insulating material that builders use. It can be carved or shaped with a sharp bread knife or similar or by using a hot wire cutter. The amount of mess is minimal.

Can't remember for the life of me what it's called in the UK, and I'm yet to experiment with it here in Oz. it can be purchased from UK mega hardware stores I'm told and it comes in usefully flat sheets. Somebody on here will know more precisely what it is and where to get it I'm sure.

Interestingly, to avoid disturbing the social harmonies of the happy home, I'm going to try stapling shade cloth to wooden formers for the next bit of landform on my main layout and add the plaster to that.

Cheers

Marty

Offline Marty

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2016, 02:08:36 pm »
Before moving on from the polystyrene saga here is a photo with one of the end facia boards removed showing the jigsaw of layers of polystyrene that made up the modelled ground and in this case, up to the top of the embankment.





Then came the fun bit, actually it was all fun, but I do like shaping the model to look earthlike. Using various tools like craft knives, rasps, wire brushes, etc the lumpy bits were smoothed out and the river carved out. In this overview the river under the Alltycefan Road bridge is obvious but the continuation of the river in the foreground less so. The halt and pagoda hut had also been mocked up.





Here's a closer view of the Alltycefan Bridge, the river bed and just under the coupling between the loco and coach the cut out in the embankment for the culvert and the stream running down the field into the river.





At the other end a tractor has been placed for scale checking and the river under the rail bridge is more apparent.





Lastly for tonight, a 14xx and autocoach on the up passenger to Pencader Junction has paused at the halt to load a barrow of flannel shirts from the Alltycefan Woollen mill.







The halt was drawn up on and cut out from packeto cornflako cardboard using dimensioned GWR Pagoda hut drawings from a couple of GWR books I have. A Dornplas plastic kit of a pagoda was ordered from the NGS shop to see what it was like.


Next we'll have a look at the kit and put it together.


cheers
Marty
« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 02:13:01 pm by Marty »

Offline Atso

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2016, 08:38:38 pm »
Marty,

Thank you so much for posting your construction methods. I would never have thought of building a layout like this - one to remember once the current layout is complete (or actually makes some progress!).

Offline Marty

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #28 on: September 19, 2016, 02:17:34 pm »
Thanks Steve,

If this rambling conglomeration of how-I-done-its and random thoughts helps someone with their own railway then all of the effort to get it down in electronic print is worth the effort... and if I learn something from someone else in the process, so much the better.

Here's the little pagoda hut from Dornplas, actually 2 huts per pack.







Don't know if you can still get them, this was a few years ago. I must pop onto the societies web page and see if they've managed to get the digital version of their excellent shop working yet... it's been a while since I've looked... ha, they do indeed now have an online listing... and DPK031   PAGODA WAITING SHELTER HUT X 2 listed for 3.80. The wonders of the digital age. Well done the society.


Here are the bits... you will notice that the tricky roof shape is a single moulding, then there are the walls and what looks like gutters and downpipes.





To me it looked a wee bit narrow, but then it could have the modelling fluid in use effecting my vision...





Construction is straight forward, 4 walls, a pair of doors and the roof. In this example, in an effort to keep everything square, clamps and a bit of timber were used and some 1mm square section styrene to strengthen the corners.





Also, in concern for the well being and comfort of the halt's passengers, two lengths of 1mm square section were joined together...





and glued to theinternal back wall of the hut as a rudimentary bench for them to sit upon while waiting for their train.





Hmmm, I wonder which glue I was using at the time?

The doors were a bit fiddly, maybe one of the hinges has rusted and the doorhas dropped... that's my story anyway. A bit more styrene strip under the windows to give a ledge and that was pretty much it.





Apart from some paint... this one in just bare, old and dirty galvanised tin with a bit of whitewash on the windows and seat inside.





The second one, which now resides on the main layout, in GWR light stone and dark stone. You see a photo of that later on during the wooden platform build.

Easy, straight forward and iconic if you are modelling a GWR branch line.


Next I tackled making a willow tree to go beside the river, I suspect that there was a tree building workshop going on somewhere at the time and as trees were going to be needed it seemed worthwhile joining in!

cheers

Marty

Offline LAandNQFan

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Re: Pentre Cwrt Halt (or Pentrecourt Halt) - Marty's Diorama
« Reply #29 on: September 20, 2016, 09:52:25 am »
I'm just starting to lay the track for Henllan, Marty.  I took some pictures of buildings round the station.  I was told that the retirement home opposite the yard entrance is essentially as it was as the Railway Inn. The shop next door still has a wiggly-tin, pagoda-curve roof as a canopy at the front, which covered the weighbridge for the coal.
Perhaps the proof that there is intelligent life in outer space is that they haven't contacted us.
Layout thread: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=23416

 

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