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Author Topic: The Train Shed Project  (Read 80418 times)

Chris in Prague, Milton Rail and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1860 on: January 12, 2018, 08:16:59 am »
Thanks for the suggestions.  The tunnel entrance it reminds me of most is the southern end of Catesby Tunnel.  I walked through it from the southern end with my girlfriend in 1969, not long after the track had been dismantled.  From the middle, it looked a frighteningly long way to either end.  By the time we reached the North end, we decided to walk back across the top, following the ventilation shafts.  In those days the the hill was covered with rough pasture, not many trees but a few scattered blackberry bushes, so that sort of effect is my final objective.  I may not do much more to it for now, other than to touch up the edges, ready for fixing the portals in place and adding the new walls.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1861 on: January 12, 2018, 09:32:46 am »
Looking good Laurence, I agree with Brian, the effect is looking good, dark & light patches with rocky outcrops breaking through

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1862 on: January 12, 2018, 08:19:34 pm »
Today, we had to pick up the car from the repairers, so that led to some fragmentation in my Train Shed activity.  First, I made some watercolour touch-ups to the edges of the tunnels.  Tomorrow, I need to start on the DOWN tunnels.  The structure there reminds me a bit of Beechwood Tunnel between Tile Hill and Berkswell &Balsall Common on the London and Birmingham.  I used to walk over that and pick blackberries.

Then I managed to run some timetable sub-cycles.  6417 is running particularly badly and I had to set the acceleration time back to zero before I could get it to run successfully.  Also, Forthampton Grange is having starting problems again.  In addition 80119 had problems at the points exiting the DOWN loops.  I also had a problem with Eire suddenly stopping.  I was able to get it going again, but when I tried to reverse it to have another run, it just would not run.  It seems that the valve gear was locking up in reverse, so I might need to have another look at it.  I had a good look today, but I couldn’t see the problem.  But it ran forwards without another problem. 

Yesterday, I did a little touching up with graphite sticks, but those areas seemed to be the most problematical, so I recleaned them with IPA, which led to some improvement.  Stanier Class 5, 45206 also had starting problems today, but it seemed to be OK afterwards.  Most of the locos are running well and I have now finished another complete timetable.  Tomorrow, I will have a look at the cab-to-tender wires and Forthampton Grange’s bogie.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1863 on: January 13, 2018, 06:48:20 pm »
I had some more good news yesterday.  The dry graphite that I had ordered arrived in the post.  I have yet to use it because all the trains are working well and none has any problem with the load, but it’s ready and waiting if I need to lubricate any wheel bearings.  I ordered two because they were fairly cheap and I thought I might as well extract the maximum value from the postage.



First thing this morning, I set about adding grass to the next tunnel structure.  It turns out that the first tunnels that I showed before are called Gatsby Tunnels.  The branch tunnel is short and quite separate to the mainline tunnel, which is a over a mile long.  This is because the branch deviates quite sharply away from the mainline in the tunnel, heading in the direction of Norton.  The seconds tunnels, that I started today are called Oakwood Tunnels.  The branch again deviates away from the mainline in the tunnel, heading off to Shipton.  I first started on the top of the tunnel structure.



Then we had our usual walk into Hessle to the butchers and for coffee.  The rest of the morning and some of the afternoon were taken up with domestic chores but, eventually, I was able to get back to the Train Shed.  I used my Rule 55 sheet to release Forthampton Grange out onto the mainline and moved it round to the station, where I was able to lift it and put it in the loco inversion cradle.  First, I used the spare 38XX bogie screw that DCC Supplies sent me when I asked for a spare for the 38XX and secured the bogie.  Then I used my Optivisor to remove the screws holding the severed cab-to-tender wires.  It turned out that both were severed.  Fortunately, I have a miniature magnetic screwdriver set (down to screw size 000) and several pairs of fine tweezers.  I managed to extract the first two screws but, when I was removing the wire tag from one of them, it shot out of the tweezers and I was unable to find it.  It was a good job I had ordered a spare pair of screws when I ordered the wires.  After that, I was able to complete all four screws and tuck the surplus wire up into the footplate area.  Here’s Forthampton Grange with the new wires secured.



While I was doing this, the Cardan shaft managed to disconnect itself and it was quite a fiddle to reconnect it because it had rotated and became out of alignment.  However, I managed to rotate it back again and all was well.  I tested Forthampton Grange with the new wires, but it was very graunchy and came to a halt more than once.  But it was usually able to recover on its own.

Then I lifted Cranmore Hall, which had one wire severed.  Then I found that there were no screws on the cab side because, when I had my first problem with it, I had soldered the wires onto the tags.  Fortunately, one was sound, so I was able to use the remaining screw to secure the new wire.  It was a real fiddle to unsolder the existing wire and then fit the screw into the socket but, in the end, all was well.  After I put Cranmore Hall back and tested it, I then ran Forthampton Grange round to its ‘home’ loop and it ran really well this time.  I have added some graphite to one or two points on the tracks, but I am not convinced that it didn’t make things worse, so I will give everything a good clean with IPA again.  When I had finished work on the locos, I reset the points and put the Rule 55 sheet to bed.

During this session, I managed to complete the first pass at completing the Oakwood Tunnels grass.  Before I left, I returned it to the layout.



I need to touch up the edges of the tunnel structures, ready for attaching the portals and adding walls.  Hopefully, I will be able to report progress on this soon.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1864 on: January 14, 2018, 07:55:21 pm »
After the loco servicing of yesterday and the completion of the base layers of grass on both tunnels, I thought that, given the running issues I have had over the last few days, I would resort to yet another cleaning cycle.  In fact, the actual track cleaning doesn’t take long at all.  To clean each set of loops takes about ten minutes and the open tracks take slightly longer.  The main time-consuming part of track cleaning is moving the trains about to leave clear tracks for cleaning.  Anyway, first thing this morning, I cleaned all the open tracks and then moved everything out of the UP loops ready for cleaning them.  Normally, we go for a walk along the river after that, but Celia had a problem with trying to log into her pension website so, by the time we had sorted that out, it was time for coffee.  Then I had quite a lot of cutting back in the garden.  In the afternoon, I had quite a few jobs to do before it was time for a cup of tea.  Then I went back to the Train Shed and finished the entire cleaning run. 

After cleaning the UP loops, I moved the trains to enable me to clean the DOWN loops.  I took the opportunity to take some pictures of trains as they moved around the layout.  First is a picture of 45572 ‘Eire’ standing at Platform 2 with its ten coaches, which just fit into the length of the platform.



Here’s another picture from a distance, showing the whole train in the station.



Later, I was able to get a picture of 46122 ‘Royal Ulster Rifleman’ emerging from Gatsby Tunnel with a DOWN twelve-coach express.



Later still, I snapped this one of 5041 ‘Tiverton Castle’ just about to enter Gatsby Tunnel with an UP eleven-coach express.



When I had cleaned all of the DOWN loops, I remarshalled the trains back to the ‘home’ loops.  Recently, there has been talk of fish trains on other topics. So I thought I would show a picture of 92006 emerging from Gatsby Tunnel with an DOWN fish train, for comparison with the picture of an A4 with a fish train emerging from a tunnel.



During the final movements, Stanier Class 5, 45206, began to labour with its milk train, with much grinding of tender drive wheels.  So tomorrow, before I do anything else, I will have to investigate whether the problem is caused by bearing friction in the train or the need for lubrication of the valve gear.
« Last Edit: Today at 09:21:14 am by Innovationgame »
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1865 on: Yesterday at 08:04:25 am »
Great photo's Laurence, good to see you getting some issues with the loco's resolved

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1866 on: Yesterday at 08:11:14 am »
Love the fish train!

Much discussion about same on Wrenton thread at moment!
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1867 on: Yesterday at 08:51:39 am »
Talking of the superlative Wrenton. Here is what Roger posted re: static grass which may be useful for you, too, Laurence: "Hi Chris. Yes, static grass everywhere! I wish it had been around when I last tried building a layout (1960s - ouch!). Most of it is War World Scenics but there's a little bit of Noch here and there. As with painting roads, I think it's important not to use the same colour all over an area. I've avoided using the spring colours and only used the summer ones mixed with some autumn colours. Their patchy mix is quite useful, too. I've used Gaugemaster glue most of the time, but have also used the WWS stuff. Also the latter's layering spray for adding longer or differenly coloured patches. I usually make a paper mask when using the spray adhesive so that I can control the area that I want to cover. I use 1mm length in cared-for situations (mostly the gardens, of course) and 2mm as the norm elsewhere but with some 4mm here and there (along that fence in the village photo for example) and even a few small areas of 6mm.

There are some step by step videos on the WWS web site (http://www.war-world.co.uk/) and loads more on YouTube."

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1868 on: Yesterday at 08:03:32 pm »
Today was a rather strange day.  First, I checked the operation of Point 26 in the DOWN loops, which had failed again yesterday.  The turnout blade had become detached from the tie bar.  This was the fourth time it has happened.  The first two times, I simply levered the lug back into the slot in the tie bar and it worked for a few weeks, before failing again.  On the third occasion, I put a dab of PVA on the inside of the switch blade to stop it from moving.  However, it failed again yesterday.  This time I have put a dab of UHU onto the inside of the switch blade.  If it fails again, I will try one of the singe use Superglue capsules that I have.  The final fall-back plan is to replace the point with a spare one I have, but that will entail lifting at least one other point and some track, so it’s not a simple job.  But, when I tested it this morning, all was well.  I’ll just have to keep my fingers crossed (not that it will make any difference).

Then I began to address the problems with Stanier Class 5, 45206.  The first task was to invoke Rule 55 and set some points to allow it to circulate on test.  It was terrible.  But then we had to go off to play table tennis, which was the end of Train Shed operations for the morning.

Later, we had the plasterer visit to assess the work involved in removing all the tiles in the kitchen before our kitchen makeover.  In the afternoon, I began to drain the wildlife pond.  I don’t know what’s happened to it but, in the Autumn, it started to smell rather like sewerage and an oily film formed on the surface.  Later, I noticed that all the snails were floating, dead, on the surface.  So, today,  I took one of our hose reels, connected it to the tap and turned on the water.  I stretched it away so that the far end was lower that the bottom of the pond and opened the outlet until I was sure the hose was full, then I closed the outlet.  I was then able to turn off the water and disconnect the hose from the tap before submerging the tap end of the hose in the pond.  I opened the outlet at the far end and the water began to flow, although only at a dribble.  By tea time (sorry, dinner time) the level had dropped by about three inches, so I will just leave it draining until it’s empty.

But I digress.  After a cup of tea, I returned to the Train Shed to address the problems of 45206.  First, I removed the train and ran the loco as a light engine, without the obligatory speed restrictions.  It still wasn’t good, although much better than with a full load.  I tested each tanker in turn, in addition to the brake van.  All but four were very free running.  Two of the others responded to some wheel spinning.  The other two were not so good.  Here’s 45206 with the removed tankers.



The two on the left were the worst.  I tried puffing some graphite powder into the bearings, but that seemed to make matters worse.  Then I applied some Dapol oil and worked them back and forth over some kitchen role covered track to remove all the oil from the wheels.  They were still not much better.  So I reassembled the train, minus the two suspect tankers and tried some circuits.  There was much grinding of tender drive wheels on some of the curves, mostly tight radius ones but, notably, on one of the largest radius curves.  I noticed that the tender seemed slightly askew.  I removed the loco and examined the tender.  One of the rear axle traction tyres was missing and the other was half off the metal tyre.  I replaced it, but there was no improvement.  Indeed, it seemed to become worse.  Another examination showed that the tyre had come off again, so I removed it.  There was still no improvement and I surmised that it needed two new traction tyres.

Fortunately, I had a small stock of ‘O’ traction tyres that I had bought for Dicheat Manor when it had shed its tyres.  With a certain amount of manipulation, using two pairs of fine tweezers, I was able to fit the new tyres successfully.  Here’s 45206, on its back, in the service cradle, after the two tyres were fitted.



To my great relief, that did the trick.  Everything was back to normal and I was able to reduce the top speed back to its original setting.  I had increased it during the investigation to see if that would help, but it didn’t.  So, there was not much modelling, nor running today, but at least we are back in business again.  My final action was to reset the Rule 55 points to normal and sign them off. 

I must investigate the traction tyres of 45572 ‘Eire’ because it displayed the same symptoms after the previous track cleaning session although it seemed to improve again later.  I may need to check traction tyres more regularly.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1869 on: Yesterday at 08:34:45 pm »
I'm starting to wonder if one of your track cleaning fluids is attacking the rubber of the traction tyres, Laurence :hmmm:
I'm not aware of IPA attacking rubber but, out of curiosity, once you've cleaned with IPA do you leave it for a few minutes to evaporate before running anything over it?

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1870 on: Yesterday at 09:25:11 pm »
I'm starting to wonder if one of your track cleaning fluids is attacking the rubber of the traction tyres, Laurence :hmmm:
I'm not aware of IPA attacking rubber but, out of curiosity, once you've cleaned with IPA do you leave it for a few minutes to evaporate before running anything over it?
I clean it with IPA on clean card and then use another piece of clean card to dry it off and absorb any residue.  It's generally some minutes after cleaning before any trains run over the newly cleaned track.  The problem with Eire started after using Track Magic, so I'm not going to be using that again.  What is strange is that, after a full cleaning, every time I run a piece of clean card over the track, it gathers track stains just like when I am cleaning it .  No matter how many times I repeat this, it still happens.  I can only think that a microscopoic layer of metal film is being coated onto the card.
With kind regards
Laurence

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Re: The Train Shed Project
« Reply #1871 on: Today at 09:41:48 am »
I used the 'Clean Track Solution' out of the WS Tidy Track cleaning kit and found it left a greasy residue on the track so, needless to say, I have never used it again and just use IPA with the kit. Trouble is the pads tend to snag on pointwork.

 

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