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Author Topic: Driving in France  (Read 856 times)

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Online Nick

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2018, 11:09:15 am »
And remember the penalties in France for using a mobile phone while in the driving seat of a car. This recent article gives plenty of detail:

https://www.thelocal.fr/20180205/french-drivers-banned-from-using-mobile-phones-in-carseven-when-they-arent-moving
Isn't the situation very similar here in the UK? You mustn't hold a phone "while driving", but can while "safely parked"?

As I understand it, the legal interpretations of "driving" and "parked" mean that to use a handheld, you have to be properly parked up in an spot where it's legal to park, with the parking brake on, engine switched off and the keys out of the ignition. (no idea how that works with keyless ignition.) Stopping on a roundabout with your hazards on doesn't cut it...
Nick

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Offline joe cassidy

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2018, 11:13:05 am »
The rule about priority to traffic on the right only applies in Paris.

The rule for roundabouts is the same as in the UK - vehicles on the roundabout have priority over those joining it.

Best regards,


Joe

Online weave

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2018, 11:34:43 am »
The rule about priority to traffic on the right only applies in Paris.

The rule for roundabouts is the same as in the UK - vehicles on the roundabout have priority over those joining it.

Best regards,


Joe

Hi Joe,

That is true but I believe some drivers of the old school, shall we say, are either not aware of this or just choose to ignore it so just be aware, be careful and THINK RIGHT!!!
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 11:41:07 am by weave »

Offline daffy

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2018, 12:10:20 pm »
And remember the penalties in France for using a mobile phone while in the driving seat of a car. This recent article gives plenty of detail:

https://www.thelocal.fr/20180205/french-drivers-banned-from-using-mobile-phones-in-carseven-when-they-arent-moving
Isn't the situation very similar here in the UK? You mustn't hold a phone "while driving", but can while "safely parked"?

Yes, much the same. My main intent was to illustrate the level of the French fine itself, and I should add that from what I've read and learnt from self and friends is that in France and other European countries, such as Switzerland and Germany, the Police are far more pro-active in stopping drivers and issuing fines than here in the U.K.
Mike

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Online Bealman

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2018, 12:23:14 pm »
Try NSW, mate. It's a blumming police state when it comes to that!  :beers:
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Online Dancess

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2018, 01:07:44 pm »
The rule about priority to traffic on the right only applies in Paris.

The rule for roundabouts is the same as in the UK - vehicles on the roundabout have priority over those joining it.

Best regards,


Joe

We still have some roads around here that have no signs so have to treat them with respect, mind you it's very rare that you meet another vehicle.
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Offline Railwaygun

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Offline Fardap

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2018, 01:52:56 pm »
The rule about priority to traffic on the right only applies in Paris.

The rule for roundabouts is the same as in the UK - vehicles on the roundabout have priority over those joining it.

Best regards,


Joe

Hi Joe,

That is true but I believe some drivers of the old school, shall we say, are either not aware of this or just choose to ignore it so just be aware, be careful and THINK RIGHT!!!


Yes that is true the older generation sometimes run under the older rules, lived in Toulouse for 5 years and the majority obey the same UK rule but the odd one didn't. Also the majority of minor roads having priority onto a main road have gone although there are always the odd ones to catch you out, mainly within towns and villages though.

In the five years I was there I was initially horrified at the bad driving around A roads but equally impressed with the keep right on the dual carriageways and Autoroutes, only overtaking and the ridiculously fast using the left (outer) lane(s).

I was equally as horrified on my return to the UK to find how much the driving had deteriorated in five years, along with the roads!!

Enjoy a pothole free experience

Steve

Online Nick

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2018, 02:02:55 pm »
One thing that has not been mentioned, but is worth bearing in mind when planning any trip through Europe is the proliferation of Urban Access restrictions and Low Emission Zones in recent times.

The LEZs particularly are a bit of a minefield as the criteria vary from country to country and sometimes city to city. As does whether you have to obtain and display a permit or simply register your vehicle with some scheme. Some work on ANPR systems, but don't have details of foreign vehicles, so you have to register, etc. They may or may not be a fee...

These schemes may stop you driving into some zones entirely if you have an older car, especially a diesel, but registration/display requirements are likely to be relevant even if you are ultimately entitled to enter the zone.

The best way into the maze that I know of is here
Nick

The perfect is the enemy of the good - Voltaire

Offline Wrinkly1

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2018, 05:25:09 pm »
Went from Portsmouth to Cherbourg on the 'fastcat' ferry about 3 weeks ago (and returned in one piece!). Drove down through Normandy and most the way across Brittany during that holiday. I can tell you that the route from Cherbourg to Louargat village is almost all dual carriageway (or even 3 lane near Avaranches), and is very easy driving these days compared to when I first went 30 years ago. That first stage ought to take you about 4 and a half to 5 hours plus stoppage time. In general the road rules are very similar to the UK except for the hi-viz clothing for all. On these major roads you won't have to worry about 'priority from the right'. The signage is clear to all. We did come across the rule inside the town limits where we were staying however, but as there was a low speed limit thereabouts it was no problem. If you are camping where I think you might be staying in Louargat, just take extra care in the lanes around the village as the priority rules might not have been updated. Similarly, the route from there to Concarneau is on fairly good 2 lane roads but again, take care when going through the towns and villages en route. It's a very civilised area in which to take a holiday these days (even the public toilets!) and the Bretons usually seem to prefer Brits to Parisiennes, so enjoy!

Offline bob lawrence

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2018, 09:32:45 pm »
Thanks to all for the excellent feedback, had already got hi viz jackets and warning triangle from previous trips, bought breathalysers as some sites say still must have. Bought a low emission zone sticker, although may not be needed it didnít cost much and doesnít expire. Have a Mk 3 Citreon C5 which has directional headlights which bend as steering round corners which I have turned off, weird experience! and headlight beam is set central so no beam correction stickers needed. One of the dashboard dials can be changed to show, in big numbers, the speed and can be changed to kph.
Have always been cautious on roundabouts having had a couple of issues, not near misses but hairy anyway.
Thanks for all the kind wishes for a good holiday, Iím sure we will.
 :thankyousign:


Online njee20

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2018, 09:41:57 pm »
Itís not about the beam being central, nor swivling on corners, itís that the beam is asymmetric, and Ďflaresí on the near side. In Europe that will be dazzling oncoming traffic.

Offline Newportnobby

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2018, 09:50:18 pm »
Have a Mk 3 Citreon C5

You should fit right in up until the point they chuck you in the Bastille for incorrect spelling ;)

Offline Railwaygun

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2018, 10:18:29 pm »
Any old  bulb set will do! I have a Peugeot ( spell checked) set in my Jazz
Glove pocket

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Please excuse spilling and procrastination
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 10:21:17 pm by Railwaygun »
This has been a public service announcement
It may contain alternative facts

Caveat lector

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Offline LAandNQFan

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Re: Driving in France
« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2018, 10:25:04 pm »
No-one has mentioned the thing I've always found most useful when driving abroad: a wife who automatically says every time you join a road or reach a junction,"You are looking left; you are driving on the right!" 
Last week in Invergary I managed to attract the attention of a French driver just before he drove round a corner into an oncoming lorry.  A quick swerve to the left and he survived. 
Perhaps the proof that there is intelligent life in outer space is that they haven't contacted us.
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