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Author Topic: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)  (Read 34120 times)

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Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #405 on: May 28, 2018, 09:51:08 am »


I also plugged in the computer to adjust the throw on one of the turnout operating servos which was not quite closing the point blades properly.  I have found that with the MERG 4 servo software, if you change the settings on one servo you have to redo the other three as well, otherwise when you save your new setting for the first servo it will wipe whatever you had programmed for the other three and replace it with a neutral default setting. Perhaps I am doing something wrong. I now decided I needed a second loco, regauged my J39 and found that the tender drive would not run smoothly through turnouts no matter how much I fiddled with the back to backs.

Richard

Hi Richard
I'm really pleased you are getting good running - your attention to the mechanical detail is second to none. Thats something that is often lacking in many layouts of whatever scale.

The MERG software does indeed work as you describe. You do need to set all four servos at once and then save them. Very annoying. Once we had realised this, it didnt take us long to take the plunge and buy the kit for the servo setting box. Mind you, we have over 20 servo4s on Northallerton and you can imagine setting that many servos (over 80) would be difficult using a computer. The servo setting box is so easy. Plug it in set up 'on' position, save,  set up 'off' position, save. If you want you can set servo speeds too. Downside was cost, which was about 20 quid, plus a couple of extra quid for me to buy new pots because I cut the stalks too short  :dunce:.

Im off to read the new wheel gauging thread  :)

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton is making its next appearance in the July 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller
and in real life at RailEx NE North Shields, 28th/29th July 2018.

Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Online maridunian

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #406 on: May 30, 2018, 12:36:21 pm »

... my check-rail tops at Mwyniwr Tryciau are all  nice and shiny, but they oughtn't to be really and it bugs me.  ...


Maybe try brown permanent marker?  Then you can redo them in seconds each time you clean the track.

Thanks Richard - Tried that but got bored with re-doing it. Might get the little files out to drop the top surfaces a bit before painting them....

Online Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #407 on: May 30, 2018, 12:52:53 pm »

... my check-rail tops at Mwyniwr Tryciau are all  nice and shiny, but they oughtn't to be really and it bugs me.  ...


Maybe try brown permanent marker?  Then you can redo them in seconds each time you clean the track.

Thanks Richard - Tried that but got bored with re-doing it. Might get the little files out to drop the top surfaces a bit before painting them....

Not sure I'd recommend using anything abrasive on track surfaces as it just gives somewhere extra for crud to accumulate :worried:

Online maridunian

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #408 on: June 01, 2018, 03:55:58 pm »

Tried that but got bored with re-doing it. Might get the little files out to drop the top surfaces a bit before painting them....

Not sure I'd recommend using anything abrasive on track surfaces as it just gives somewhere extra for crud to accumulate :worried:

Just the check-rail top edges prior to painting them brown, not the running rails. I'll try one and report back!

Mike

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #409 on: June 13, 2018, 12:05:52 am »
Not much to report on the layout as I have been fiddling about with home made track, but changes may be in the offing.  Longframlington's past is catching up with it.  The layout was originally intended as a test bed for Finetrax Code 40 and metal-framed baseboards so I kept the track plan very simple, with a single long siding in the goods yard.  It has turned out to be a nightmare to operate, and I am sure a real railway would not have been arranged that way.

So I am building the first of a pair of turnouts to NMRA specification, which will form a crossover allowing access direct from the run-round loop to the cattle dock. I will also put in another uncoupler, maybe two.  All this will require a bit of surgery: I plan to install the turnout in the siding first, so if it all goes wrong I only have a short length of plain track to reinstate. I am also thinking of putting in a short siding parallel to the headshunt at the end of the platform, just to have another siding to play with.  The photo gives some idea of the planned changes.


Richard

Online Newportnobby

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #410 on: June 13, 2018, 09:50:17 am »
I reckon the proposed changes will give much more operational fun

Online Black Sheep

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #411 on: June 13, 2018, 11:17:31 am »
The real railway could be quite odd in how it was laid out, for example, the Midland avoided facing points as then there was no requirement to fit facing point locks and there couldn't be a derailment due to a point not being fully across - the exception to this of course being station throats in termini, as my layout is partly ex midland it has few facing points and station cross overs are trailing requiring a bit more shunting stuff around, but this should add to the interest to operate.

too much shunting around can take enjoyment out of things, (the single slips in my marshalling yard might get annoying) and as you are modelling a much latter time period, between which standards have changed, other standards been built (and scrapped) it's probable that the track layout would have been changed as usage of the yard changed.

Online SheldonC

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #412 on: June 13, 2018, 05:14:42 pm »
The real railway could be quite odd in how it was laid out, for example, the Midland avoided facing points as then there was no requirement to fit facing point locks and there couldn't be a derailment due to a point not being fully across - the exception to this of course being station throats in termini, as my layout is partly ex midland it has few facing points and station cross overs are trailing requiring a bit more shunting stuff around, but this should add to the interest to operate.

too much shunting around can take enjoyment out of things, (the single slips in my marshalling yard might get annoying) and as you are modelling a much latter time period, between which standards have changed, other standards been built (and scrapped) it's probable that the track layout would have been changed as usage of the yard changed.
I'm an S&DR/NER/LNER/BR(E) fan (mainly), but I think the MR way was workmanlike (railwaymanlike?), and I've used it in my embryonic layout - on the through lines, at least.  I do have some facing points on the loop, but they protect the main line from unauthorised access from the loop, like trap points.  (I did buy some Peco catch points, but I understand they are based on the ones you would expect to find on an incline to derail runaways.)  And, of course, the loop is accessed from the main line via a facing point, which I think the MR would not normally allow.  I could see no other way of arranging an overtaking manoeuvre involving 2 passenger trains.

Online Black Sheep

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #413 on: June 14, 2018, 09:30:15 am »
the loop is accessed from the main line via a facing point, which I think the MR would not normally allow.  I could see no other way of arranging an overtaking manoeuvre involving 2 passenger trains.

I believe correct practice was to pass the loop and reverse into it, the loop may have had an exit onto the opposite running line so it could be used by either direction, this understanding is based on Earby (Pendle Forest MRC's N gauge layout) where the loop is the goods yard access

It's possible they did have loops to pull slower trains out of the way of faster workings, but I don't know, my layout does have this on the ex midland section though

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #414 on: June 17, 2018, 10:35:26 pm »
The idea of pulling up my lovely Finetrax track to insert new turnouts was all starting to get a bit frightening.  I wasn't sure whether I would be able to lift the track without wrecking the balsawood base, or lay the new track and persuade it to sit flat and level with the adjacent sections.  I also hadn't tested my new turnout operating system and had no idea whether it would actually hold together once installed on a layout.

So I was mooching around on various Internet forums and had a bit of inspiration. Trap points.  These were a Board of Trade requirement for any siding which led directly onto a passenger-carrying line, and like 99% of modellers I had completely ignored this feature of the real railway because on a model, trap points don't actually do anything other than add extra cost and derailment potential.  They are however very simple to build (no crossing frog) so I built one to fit the end of the goods siding, using a C8 turnout template cut in half. Construction was the same as my experimental B6 NMRA turnout, i.e. a mixture of PCB sleepers with etched nickel silver chairplates, and styrene strip sleepers with Finetrax chairs minus their locating pegs. (See http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=41479.45 for more details.)

I found that the Finetrax sleeper base lifted away quite easily with a little help from a sharp knife, and I was able to scrape off the ballast and glue with a Stanley blade, leaving the balsawood base a little scored and tatty but still usable.  I carefully trimmed my trap point to length, glued it down with PVA glue and weighted it with large quantities of 2 pence coins until the glue set. I had to cut a rectangular hole in the baseboard to clear the turnout operating mechanism, which was done with a carbide cutter in my trusty Chinese Dremel knockoff.



The operating mechanism uses a thick tiebar underneath the sleepers and is virtually invisible.  To move the tiebar I had a MERG 3D printed servo mount lying around courtesy of @kirky so I fitted that.  I will be using relays for frog polarity switching, so I found I could put a couple of 8BA screws and nuts into the redundant microswitch holes to act as a limit stop, so that the servo doesn't destroy the blades and tiebar if it goes berserk as they occasionally do.  The MERG servo mount has a facility which automatically disconnects drive if the servo moves beyond a certain angle, but it is configured for a rather longer tiebar throw than mine.





I don't have any spare servo control ports on my two boards, so I "borrowed" one for testing and after a small amount of adjustment it all worked beautifully. I still have to connect a couple of wire droppers to the trap point before I can run trains over it, but once that is done it will be ready for ballasting.

So now I can get on with constructing another three B6 turnouts, a trap point for the bay platform, two MERG servo boards, two more uncouplers and probably a MERG servo setting box which I am told is much better than using a PC to set up the servos. That should keep me busy for a while.

Richard


Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #415 on: June 17, 2018, 11:29:33 pm »
All is quiet at Longframlington, with the line closed yet again for engineering works. Time for a swift pint of mild before catching the replacement bus service to Morpeth...




Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #416 on: Yesterday at 05:24:01 pm »


Another two B6 turnouts under way, slightly fewer PCB sleepers than the first one (13 vs. 15) as I continue to refine the design.  The hardest part (frog crossings) is done, but plenty more to keep me busy.  I don't think there's actually any real time saving in building them in pairs like this but it feels like I am making faster progress anyway :)  After these two I want to build one more to replace the shonky one opposite the signalbox but the remaining three original Finetrax turnouts can stay where they are unless the tiebars break or something else falls apart.

Richard

Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #417 on: Yesterday at 08:41:52 pm »
@belstone
They look excellent Richard.
Just remind me, are you using a jig to form the V?

cheers
Kirky
Northallerton is making its next appearance in the July 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller
and in real life at RailEx NE North Shields, 28th/29th July 2018.

Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

Offline belstone

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #418 on: Yesterday at 11:31:50 pm »

They look excellent Richard.
Just remind me, are you using a jig to form the V?

cheers
Kirky

A jig of sorts: a wooden block with two pieces of angled brass glued to it.  Small bulldog clips hold the rails in place for soldering.  It is a really rubbish way to make crossing vees, takes ages to get the rails upright and correctly positioned, so I need to devise something better when I get the time.



But my methods are fairly primitive in general.  Here's a shot of my "workbench" :)


Offline kirky

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Re: Longframlington (Northumbrian branch line)
« Reply #419 on: Today at 12:02:43 am »
A jig of sorts: a wooden block with two pieces of angled brass glued to it.  Small bulldog clips hold the rails in place for soldering.  It is a really rubbish way to make crossing vees, takes ages to get the rails upright and correctly positioned, so I need to devise something better when I get the time.
I admire your ingenuity. Certainly producing good results
Presumably a couple of grooves cut at the right angle is the way to go? Not sure how you would do that without a milling machine though.
Having said that, I was talking to one of our P4 modellers at the weekend and we were discussing filing points for Vs. It seems the P4 society offer a couple of options for making the V. Perhaps I can find out specifics.

Cheers
Kirky
Northallerton is making its next appearance in the July 2018 edition of Raiway Modeller
and in real life at RailEx NE North Shields, 28th/29th July 2018.

Layout: Northallerton: http://www.ngaugeforum.co.uk/SMFN/index.php?topic=1671.msg16930#msg16930

www.northallertonngauge.co.uk

Cleveland Model Railway club website: www.clevelandmrc.club

 

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