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Author Topic: Union Mills detailing  (Read 14439 times)

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Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2015, 04:12:20 pm »
Thanks for all your comments. I agree the weathering is a bit heavy, but it's only a quick temporary job with some Daler Soft Pastel applied with a cotton wool bud and tends to wear off over time.

Lots more to do (I've thinned one of the coupling rods down already on the other side of the loco). I think the next job with be the handbrake, coal rails and hand rails on the tender, I'm also I'm tempted to reduce the depth of the loco frame between the front wheels and buffer beam so that the bottom is roughly flush with the bottom of the buffer beam as per real life  (helped by having a DG instead of a Rapido coupling). I've also got some chaps to go in the cab though they don't look as good as Pete's duo.

Offline CarriageShed

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2015, 04:23:03 pm »
I've also got some chaps to go in the cab though they don't look as good as Pete's duo.


Ave Ricardus

I don't have the time to focus on extremely fine detailing like thinning the coupling rods, so washing and detailing will have to be enough for me.

The loco crew are from Langley (No A60P), pre-painted by a supplier on eBay. The paint needed only a little touching-up and straightening-out. If you're crewing a large number of locos in a short space of time then you can also buy them unpainted. They're standing on a simple card plate that has been scored vertically (firebox to coal heap) and which sits just above the tender. It's rounded at that end so that it doesn't interfere with cornering:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/pufferwillies_sheffield_transport_models?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2754

Peter

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2015, 05:31:27 pm »
Thanks for that Pete.  I like the way the fireman's standing on the card plate so he's set back from the cab.

I did look at reducing the length of the drawbar to see if the loco tender separation could be reduced, but it looks like it's set like that to allow for 9in radius  curves which unfortunately I've got in my hidden section

I think as well the time taken to add increasing levels  of detail another obvious drawback with adding delicate detail is that you're reducing the robustness of the models which is one of their advantages, i.e.. the ability to handle them without too much care. I tend to find bits fall off occasionally and need reglueing.

Richard

Offline CarriageShed

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2015, 06:47:28 pm »
The Class 700s were pretty good runners, so the fireman's just taking a leisurely shovel of coal to keep the fire topped up.

Oh gods, yes. Lamp irons on the smokebox are my biggest bugbear. The times they've come off with the merest brush!

I can't remember offhand what the drawbar is like for this particular loco, but a friend produced a shortened drawbar for one of my Farish 4Fs. 'All you need', as they say, is a bit of wide-ish brass with two suitably-sized holes in it. Once you've produced one that's right for your layout then you'll know what to do for next time. I'll be doing it where I can with all locos when they get detailed. I have a few curves that are very close to 9in radius (if they're not exactly that), and my closed-up 4F is still happy, as are closed-up gaps between Farish suburban coaches. The gap seems to have been over-generous, so you probably still have some room for manoeuvre with old locos and with UM locos.

Offline Dr Al

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2015, 07:04:46 pm »
I can't remember offhand what the drawbar is like for this particular loco, but a friend produced a shortened drawbar for one of my Farish 4Fs. 'All you need', as they say, is a bit of wide-ish brass with two suitably-sized holes in it.

You can't use a metal drawbar with UM locos as the loco is one polarity, the tender the opposite, so a metal drawbar will short everything out.

Cheers,
Alan
Quote from: Roy L S
If Dr Al is online he may be able to provide a more comprehensive answer.

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2015, 07:13:30 pm »
Not brass for UM, use plastic else you'll be looking for short circuits. Best material to use is old credit/debit cards, cut into strips of required length, drill holes and fit - job done; if you are likely to run on a different layout with more generous curves, cut some shorter spares.

To make it a bit easier to separate loco from tender I use PCB connectors

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Female-Single-40-Square-Pin-Header-Components/dp/B008QUVM4E/ref=pd_sim_sbs_computers_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=1JHER62QJMJ8EB0H0JWB

the plastic is easy to cut. You could also use them in other places on a layout, example street or yard lamps, colour light signals etc unplug them when a layout is packed for transport.
Cheers MIKE
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Offline CarriageShed

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #21 on: April 22, 2015, 11:39:14 pm »
It's a good job I said that I couldn't remember offhand about UM drawbars. That absolves me from all blame. ;)

Offline R Marshall

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2015, 08:16:14 pm »
Thanks for all your comments. I agree the weathering is a bit heavy, but it's only a quick temporary job with some Daler Soft Pastel applied with a cotton wool bud and tends to wear off over time.

Lots more to do (I've thinned one of the coupling rods down already on the other side of the loco). I think the next job with be the handbrake, coal rails and hand rails on the tender, I'm also I'm tempted to reduce the depth of the loco frame between the front wheels and buffer beam so that the bottom is roughly flush with the bottom of the buffer beam as per real life  (helped by having a DG instead of a Rapido coupling). I've also got some chaps to go in the cab though they don't look as good as Pete's duo.

Ricardus,

I altered the frames at the front of my UM J26 by filing a concave curve not exactly like the actual J26, but a similar shape. The 700 class seems to have had a more angular shape - almost a right angle at the point it drops from buffer beam level to fall to the front guard irons. I think it'll make a big improvement, if you can do that whilst leaving enough of the chassis base plate to engage with the front holding screw.

Offline R Marshall

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2015, 08:21:22 pm »
Not brass for UM, use plastic else you'll be looking for short circuits. Best material to use is old credit/debit cards, cut into strips of required length, drill holes and fit - job done; if you are likely to run on a different layout with more generous curves, cut some shorter spares.

To make it a bit easier to separate loco from tender I use PCB connectors

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Female-Single-40-Square-Pin-Header-Components/dp/B008QUVM4E/ref=pd_sim_sbs_computers_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=1JHER62QJMJ8EB0H0JWB

the plastic is easy to cut. You could also use them in other places on a layout, example street or yard lamps, colour light signals etc unplug them when a layout is packed for transport.


Really interested in this idea of pcb connectors, because the connecting wire from the tender drive on UM locos tends to wear away with repeated disconnection/reconnection - any chance of a picture showing how you use the parts and how the connection to the loco is effected, please?

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2015, 09:01:01 pm »


I altered the frames at the front of my UM J26 by filing a concave curve not exactly like the actual J26, but a similar shape. The 700 class seems to have had a more angular shape - almost a right angle at the point it drops from buffer beam level to fall to the front guard irons. I think it'll make a big improvement, if you can do that whilst leaving enough of the chassis base plate to engage with the front holding screw.

By chance I had a nice new Zona saw arrive in the post yesterday so thought I would put it to use. I  made 2 simple cuts 1) a horizontal one to remove the coupling box from the underside of the body and 2) a vertical cut to remove the thin front part of the keep plate that goes underneath the coupling box . This gives a right angle drop & as you predicted I think it has made a big improvement, you get more of the sense of how the original was rebuilt in part by extending the smokebox & frame (I'm comparing the two in the copy of LSWR Locomotives by Bradley I took out from my local library today (Winchester) which happily has a sizeable railway collection stored in its  own room!) .  I've also made a start on making some guard irons, I'll post a picture in the near future to show what it looks like

Richard

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2015, 09:31:45 pm »
Quote
any chance of a picture showing how you use the parts and how the connection to the loco is effected, please?

At the moment all my railway stuff is still packed in boxes following a downsizing house to flat move, it'll take me another week or two at least to get anywhere near organised.

Main problem using connectors on UM locos is almost the whole loco is metal, but as far as I know not a metal that you can solder to, so you need to make a mechanical connection, the way the wire from the tender is fixed is pushing it into the hole above the coupling where it is held by the screw holding the coupling, you could use the same hole for the pin of one of the PCB connectors, it would need to be bent up at right angles to prevent it fouling on the tender and the mating PCB socket soldered to the end of the wire from the tender, a short piece of heat shrink tubing  should go over the wire to socket solder joint, prevent it shorting to the tender body and probably make it a bit stronger.

I first used the plug and socket method on Fleischmann and Minitrix tender drive locos, for those you need a twin plug and socket. Araldite the socket to the cab floor, hide it with crew.

Cheers MIKE
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Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #26 on: April 25, 2015, 08:40:12 pm »
As mentioned in my previous post here's a shot of the Drummond 700 with a couple of cuts made to remove some of the front of the chassis in order to make it look more like the prototype



I've also added guard irons & injectors to the frame plus thinned down the coupling rod a bit. Would ideally have liked to thin the rod a bit further, but decided discretion was the better part of valour

Richard


Offline fisherman

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #28 on: April 26, 2015, 04:20:16 pm »
alternatively...


just  sit  further  away.....
<o({{{<<

Offline fisherman

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2015, 04:21:10 pm »
superb  work  though!!!
<o({{{<<

 

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