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Author Topic: Union Mills detailing  (Read 14127 times)

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Offline austinbob

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Union Mills detailing
« on: May 11, 2013, 08:08:51 pm »
 :beers:

I've had good reports of Union Mills locos for reliability and pulling power. However I've also heard that they have fairly basic detailing. Are there any detailing kits or instructions to improve these obviously excellent models?

Bob
Size matters - especially if you don't have a lot of space - and N gauge is the answer!

Bob Austin

Offline EtchedPixels

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2013, 10:14:28 pm »
The usual starting point is to fit the vacuum pipes, wires for the cab rails, then either replace or repaint the buffers. Ideally give the loco a good weathering or a bit of a paint particularly on things like the connecting rods.

Some folks go as far as to strip the original paintwork, file off the moulded on handrails and redrill and replace them. That's a much bigger job.

Oh and add a crew - being older loco designs they tend to be quite open cab.
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Offline Dorsetmike

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2013, 02:31:57 pm »
Another tweak on some is to thin down the coupling rods, the 700 benefits from this. As Alan says vac pipes and crew work well, I haven't tried changing buffers but I do tone down the bright metal faces. Another item I now have but have yet to fit are lanp irons (N Brass) and for SR/BR(S) headcode discs (BHE).

Cast on handrails I usually scrape off the paint carefully or sometimes equally carefully pick out with "oily steel" or a metallic.
Cheers MIKE
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Offline R Marshall

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2015, 09:43:52 pm »
Cab Glazing, lamps and real coal help too. Coal rails on the tender and reversing lever, if appropriate can also lift them. Check you have the right size BR Crest for the class (if BR Livery) too. But as suggested above weathering and painting the wheel rims gives a major improvement - in this scale, to my eyes, they can look very good after these treatments.

If adding crew, it's worth repainting to tone down the over-bright colurs on proprietary figures - I like the Farish crew, but the blue of the overalls is far too bright in this scale.

Offline Zunnan

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2015, 10:32:27 pm »
It depends on which loco it is you're buying, but there are plenty of bits out there for most of them from simple little things as per above to removing the handrails and replacing with N Brass parts to removing detail like smokebox doors, chimneys, domes, safety bonnets etc to replace them with lost wax brass castings. N Brass, BHE and the 2mm scale association are a great source of parts, with the G2 probably the best covered for a total reworking from these sources. There are other sources too.

I do wonder if the BHE whitemetal Fowler tender can be modified to fit the UM mechanism to produce an LMS build 2P or MR 483 class rebuild...Or simply to add some variety in tender variants. Something I need to think about myself at some point to be honest.
Like a Phoenix from the ashes...morelike a rotten old Dog Bone


Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2015, 06:54:20 pm »
I have just finished the initial phase of my first go at detailing a loco so I thought I would show how things went. It's the Union Mills Drummond 700

I have replaced the buffers with the N Gauge Society “Steam loco buffers” and the coupling with a DG coupling. Otherwise it's just various thicknesses of brass and nickel silver rod.  I found I could make most of the holes for locating these just by using a needle in a pin vice. I scraped off the side part of the handrail using a scalpel leaving just a couple of remnants on the smokebox to locate the new handrail (using 0.33 mm NS), made a hole in the cab front and secured the handrail using superglue. Scraping the rail off made a few slight dents in the boiler which showed up after repainting the area I had scraped bare, but I found these disappeared from view when I applied some Daler soft pastels as part of the weathering. I may replace the handrails with a continuous rail all the way round the body together with handrail knobs, but may just leave it as it is

I also scraped off the injector and lubricator pipes and replaced with ones made of rod

I might replace the injector output pipe with one made of copper wire to try and get smoother curves on it, plus will add something to represent the clack valve. Plus hide the 2 blobs of superglue on the smoke box side

Richard


Offline austinbob

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2015, 06:56:52 pm »
That certainly looks more realistic than the original Richard.
 :beers:
Size matters - especially if you don't have a lot of space - and N gauge is the answer!

Bob Austin

Offline scottmitchell74

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2015, 06:58:20 pm »
Most impressive!
Spend as little as possible on what you need so you can spend as much as possible on what you want.

Offline mr bachmann

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2015, 08:33:20 pm »
on the LNER green locos a sheet of white lining will work wonders .

Offline Ricardus Harfelde

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2015, 11:34:50 am »

Have done some more work on the above Drummond 700, the cab roof this time. I thought I would have a go at replacing it as it looked a bit chunky, particularly when viewed from behind, and the loco stands taller than my other locos (all UM), so I thought any height reduction from a thinner roof would be welcome.





I made the roof from 5 thou brass sheet. I followed a tip whereby you score 2 lines the roof width apart (after allowing for the curvature), and then fold the sheet through 90 degrees along the score lines ( I used my Hold & Fold "Bug"). I then cut off the upturned bits of sheet and filed the remainder to create the roof side edges. I then put the curve into the roof using my fingers, followed by rolling on a 1 inch diameter bit of rod.The tranverse stiffeners were then added using 0.2mm brass rod, starting at one end and progressively soldering across in several steps (I used Carrs 179 Solder Cream). I then hacked off the existing roof, filed the cap wall tops to a curved shape and glued the new one on

I'm pleased with the result, as although the new roof is far from perfect (i.e a bit warped, etc), I think this is more than offset by the finer appearance it has given the model.

Richard

Offline Dorsetmike

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2015, 11:59:48 am »
Still needs the coupling rods thinning down and vac pipes added, hand rails,  pipework and lamp irons are good, but unless you are modeling WW2 I would suggest the weathering is overdone, the Southern usually kept all locos fairly clean not just the passenger types.
Cheers MIKE
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Online Bealman

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2015, 12:09:38 pm »
Hello from Australia and welcome to the NGF!  :thumbsup:

Your additional work on that loco looks great!
Vision over visibility. Bono, U2.

Online CarriageShed

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2015, 02:07:14 pm »
Still needs the coupling rods thinning down and vac pipes added, hand rails,  pipework and lamp irons are good, but unless you are modeling WW2 I would suggest the weathering is overdone, the Southern usually kept all locos fairly clean not just the passenger types.


The amount of detail looks very good, although I'd agree with Mike about the level of weathering. Pre-war Southern locos usually seem pretty clean, even goods locos. I simply washed mine in a murky black to take the shine off it, although I feel it could do with a little more water staining at the back of the tender. I also darkened the shiny stuff below decks and picked out the pipework before adding extra detailing:


Offline paulprice

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2015, 03:11:19 pm »
Your models look excellent, I only with the LMS took as much care with their locomotives, I have a couple of pictures of glorious Maroon jubilees, or at least they would be if they were not covered in muck.

I have not got any Union Mills locomotives at present but I think that may change soon??

Online CarriageShed

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Re: Union Mills detailing
« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2015, 03:18:37 pm »
I have not got any Union Mills locomotives at present but I think that may change soon??

That should definitely change soon. They may be basic, but they're strong and reliable and can be detailed to your heart's content.

 

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